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Arapaho Pipe

Arapaho Pipe
Date: Unknown
The records indicate that this pipe was made by someone from the Arapaho tribe on the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming. It was purchased by two different museums, before finally being purchased by the Kansas Historical Society in 1956. The soft, fine-grained material of the stone enabled the carver to shape and smooth the pipe and drill holes for the bowl and stem. It was likely never smoked as no traces of dottle (tobacco residue) remain within the bowl or on the rim.


Artifact Collection from 14MY395

Artifact Collection from 14MY395
Date: 1-1900 CE
These three artifacts were collected from an archeological site in Montgomery County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1975. The site was listed as an Early Ceramic period site, but with the inclusion of the Historic pipe it shows that people were at the site long after that time period. Shown are a small scraper made on Permian chert, a corner notched dart point made on heat treated Permian chert, and a fragment of a molded ceramic pipe bowl.


Carved Pipe Bowl from the Kansas River Valley

Carved Pipe Bowl from the Kansas River Valley
Date: Unknown
This pipe bowl was shaped and smoothed out of a soft stone. The pipe has traces of tobacco residue on the lip and has an additional hole on the base of the bowl. The pipe was donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1925.


Carved Pipestone Pipe

Carved Pipestone Pipe
Date: Unknown
This pipestone pipe, possibly Apache in origin, was donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1959. The soft pipestone enabled the pipe's maker to carve it into its final shape and incise a deep line 3/4 of the way around the stem end of the pipe. Pipes were used during trade negotiations and to mark special occasions.


Catlinite Pipe from Jefferson County

Catlinite Pipe from Jefferson County
Date: 1350-1850 CE
This Catlinite pipe was found in Jefferson County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1925. In Kansas, these pipes generally were made by American Indians between 1350 to 1850. The soft fine grain material of Catlinite enabled the pipe's maker to carve it into its rectangular shape. Pipes were used during trade negotiations and to mark special occasions.


Ceramic Pipe

Ceramic Pipe
Date: Unknown
This ceramic pipe was donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1962. The pipe's surface has a brown glaze that has blackened over the years, perhaps due to smoking. There is tobacco residue present in the pipe bowl's interior. When the pipe arrived in the collections of the Kansas Historical Society it either had no or had lost its provenience, its record of ownership. While this is disappointing it does not mean the pipe has lost all of its utility and value. It can still be used for teaching purposes.


Ceramic Pipe Bowl from 14SA409

Ceramic Pipe Bowl from 14SA409
Date: 1-1500 CE
This pipe bowl was recovered from the surface of a Saline County camp site and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 2017. The site was occupied during the Upper Republican and Smoky Hill phases during the Early and Middle Ceramic periods. The pipe retains faint traces of dottle (tobacco residue) within the bowl. The rim of the bowl was molded so as to flare outward.


Ceramic Pipe Bowl from the Markley Site, 14OT308

Ceramic Pipe Bowl from the Markley Site, 14OT308
Date: 1000-1500 CE
This reconstructed ceramic pipe bowl fragment was recovered from House 1 at the Markley site, a Smoky Hill Phase occupation site containing two or more houses. The collection from the site was donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1971. The pipe bowl was refit by the donor and has an incised line below the lip.


Ceramic Pipe Bowl from the Paint Creek Site, 14MP1

Ceramic Pipe Bowl from the Paint Creek Site, 14MP1
Date: 1500-1800 CE
This ceramic pipe bowl was found at the Paint Creek village in McPherson County, Kansas. There are no traces of tobacco residue within the bowl. The pipe bowl was donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1971. The Paint Creek site is part of the Little River focus of the Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita), whose people practiced fishing, hunting, gathering, and agriculture.


Ceramic Pipe Fragment from 14AT405

Ceramic Pipe Fragment from 14AT405
Date: 1-1000 CE
This ceramic pipe stem was collected from an Early Ceramic period camp site in Atchison County and donated in 1979 to the Kansas Historical Society. The pipe bowl is missing.


Ceramic Pipe Fragment from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1

Ceramic Pipe Fragment from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1
Date: 1650-1750 CE
This ceramic pipe fragment was recovered from the El Cuartelejo site in Scott County. The site, unique in Kansas, is the location of a seven room pueblo occupied by refugees from the Taos and Picuris pueblos in New Mexico in addition to Dismal River aspect groups (Apache). El Cuartelejo, also called the Scott County Pueblo, has been excavated and studied by many archeologists since 1898. The pipe was recovered during the 1976 Kansas Archeology Training Program. The fragment possibly represents a mouthpiece for a pipe or a fragment of a tubular style pipe called a "cloud blower."


Ceramic Pipe Fragments from the Baker House, 14MO701

Ceramic Pipe Fragments from the Baker House, 14MO701
Date: 1862
These four pipe fragments were recovered during excavations in 1972-1973 by the Kansas State Teacher's College (now Emporia State University). Two are pipe bowls decorated in a series of vertical flutes, Another is a pipe stem manufactured from a mold with two rings encircling the edge. The final artifact is a pipe stem and bowl fragments with traces of dottle, tobacco residue, in the bowl and a brass band as a connector. The collection was donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1993. The archeological site, along the Santa Fe Trail in Morris County, was the location of the Baker House, which burned in 1862, along with the nearby store, during the murder of A.I. Baker.


Ceramic Pipe Fragments from the Hamon Site, 14JF350

Ceramic Pipe Fragments from the Hamon Site, 14JF350
Date: 500-1350 CE
These two ceramic pipe bowls were excavated at an archeological site in Jefferson County. The Hamon site was a Grasshopper Falls phase Early Ceramic period with Valley phase, Sterns Creek and Loseke Creek components (multiple occupations). The site was excavated in 1971 and 1972 by Kansas Historical Society archeologists and volunteers from the Kansas Anthropological Association.


Ceramic Pipe Fragments from the Union Pacific Railroad Depot Site, 14DO324

Ceramic Pipe Fragments from the Union Pacific Railroad Depot Site, 14DO324
Date: 1869-1920
These ceramic pipe bowl and stem, from two different pipes, were recovered during excavations at the Union Pacific Railroad Depot in Lawrence, Kansas. The pipe bowl shows no traces of having been smoked. The pipe stem is made of white clay, sometimes called pipe clay, and has been refit. The stem shows a partial decoration on each side. This site served not only as a depot, but also had dwellings, a meat market, a saloon, a possible boarding house or hotel, a grain elevator and other commercial buildings located within the project area excavated in 1995 by Kansas Historical Society archeologists.


Ceramic Pipe from Leavenworth County

Ceramic Pipe from Leavenworth County
Date: 1000 - 1600 CE
This ceramic (clay) pipe was commonly manufactured by Plains and Eastern Native Americans in North America. This one was found in Leavenworth County. These pipes were used for smoking tobacco and were introduced and traded to Europeans during the American Colonial period. Early European trade pipes were modeled on the Native American designs. The bowls were often decorated with intricate lines and patterns below the rim and on the body.


Ceramic Pipe from the Ade Site, 14MP311

Ceramic Pipe from the Ade Site, 14MP311
Date: 1850-1900
This pipe fragment was collected from a multicomponent site in McPherson County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 2004. Most of the artifacts from this site dated to the Middle Ceramic and Late Ceramic periods, but this artifact is firmly into the Historic Period. Only the stem end of the pipe remains. It shows no traces of having been smoked.


Ceramic Pipe from the Kansas River Valley

Ceramic Pipe from the Kansas River Valley
Date: Unknown
This pipe was found in the Kansas River Valley and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1925. A raised band surrounds the stem attachment and a series of lines run perpendicular to the band. Traces of dottle (tobacco residue) remains in the pipe bowl's interior.


Ceramic Pipe from the Living the Dream Site, 14CO382

Ceramic Pipe from the Living the Dream Site, 14CO382
Date: 1400-1725 CE
The clay pipe fragment was recovered from a Phase IV salvage project in 1994 at the Living the Dream archeological site by Kansas Historical Society archeologists and crew. The pipe retains faint traces of dottle (tobacco residue) within the bowl. Scratches on the outer surface may have been intentional. The site, in Cowley County, was a Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita) village that had been much impacted by modern activities.


Ceramic Pipe from the Minneapolis Site, 14OT5

Ceramic Pipe from the Minneapolis Site, 14OT5
Date: 1232-1409 CE
This ceramic pipe was recovered from excavations during the 1973 Kansas Archeology Program at the Minneapolis site in Ottawa County. The Minneapolis site was a Smoky Hill aspect village site, with this pipe being recovered from one of the many house mounds. The plain pipe was fashioned from clay. Traces of dottle (tobacco residue) remain within the pipe bowl's interior. Pipes were used during trade negotiations and to mark special occasions.


Ceramic Pipe from the Quindaro Site, 14WY314

Ceramic Pipe from the Quindaro Site, 14WY314
Date: 1850-1859
This ceramic pipe was recovered during excavations at the Quindaro townsite in 1986. It was first associated with a feature at the site that was discovered to be a late 19th to early 20th century farmstead. However, as it was recovered deeply buried in a trench the Archaeologist determined that it dated from the 1850s. The pipe has a faint mark, perhaps a maker's mark, on either side of the stem. A small amount of charcoal-like residue is at the base of the pipe bowl's interior, though there are no other signs that it had been smoked.


Ceramic Pipe from the Radio Lane Site, 14CO385

Ceramic Pipe from the Radio Lane Site, 14CO385
Date: 1400-1725 CE
This ceramic pipe fragment was excavated at the Radio Lane site in Cowley County. Incised lines and triangles surround the bowl fragment. Traces of dottle (tobacco residue) remains in the pipe bowl's interior. The site was a large Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita) village. Kansas Historical Society archeologists and crew excavated there during a Phase IV archeological investigation in 1995.


Ceramic Pipe from the Woods Site, 14CY30

Ceramic Pipe from the Woods Site, 14CY30
Date: 989-1436 CE
Ceramic (clay) pipes, such as this one, were commonly made by Plains and Eastern Native Americans in North America. This pipe was recovered from the Woods site, a Smoky Hill phase village in Clay County, occupied during the Middle Ceramic period. This tubular pipe was used for smoking tobacco.


Ceramic Pipe Stem and Bowl from 14EK309

Ceramic Pipe Stem and Bowl from 14EK309
Date: 1850-1920
This pipe fragment was recovered from the surface of a multicomponent (multiple occupations) site in Elk County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1975. This historic period artifact has a faint mark, perhaps a maker's mark, on one side of the stem.


Ceramic Pipe Stem from 14MY349

Ceramic Pipe Stem from 14MY349
Date: Unknown
This pipe stem was recovered from a multicomponent site in Montgomery County with both Historic and Early Ceramic period artifacts. The pipe was made with a two part mold and has diagonal lines on both sides. The site has been much impacted by pot hunters and a reservoir.


Decorated Pipestone Pipe

Decorated Pipestone Pipe
Date: Unknown
This pipestone pipe was donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1956. The soft, fine-grained material of the pipestone enabled the carver to shape, smooth, and decorate the pipe. The stem end of the pipe has been carved into an octagonal shape and seven of the eight sides are decorated with a floral and crosshatch motif. In Kansas, these pipes generally were carved by American Indians between 1350 to 1850 CE, though they continue to be made today.


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