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Objects and Artifacts - Archeological Artifacts - Artifact Type - Mano

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Artifact Collection from 14RY1627

Artifact Collection from 14RY1627
Date: Unknown
Shown is the complete collection of surface artifacts from 14RY1627 in Riley County. Other artifacts, not in the Kansas Historical Society's collection, indicate the site had multiple components or occupations including peoples of both the Kansas City Hopewell and Smoky Hill aspects. The spear point pictured here adds a late Paleolithic to early Archaic component. In addition to the projectile point fragment two bifaces and a mano (grinding stone) are shown.


Groundstone Artifact from Riley County

Groundstone Artifact from Riley County
Date: Unknown
This groundstone tool was shaped by grinding away unwanted material. It may have been used to grind food or pigment. However, the artifact is nearly too large to be a mano, the upper hand-held millstone for grinding food or pigment. So, too, is it questionable as the lower millstone used for grinding, called a metate, because of its small size.


Groundstone Tool from 14EK303

Groundstone Tool from 14EK303
Date: 1000-1500 CE
This groundstone tool was collected from the surface of a Middle Ceramic village site in Elk County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1975. The multipurpose tool was used as an abrader on two sides and as a mano, the upper hand-held millstone for grinding foods and pigments. Some staining appears on three sides of the groundstone tool that may be pigment residue.


Mano and Nutting Stone from 14SA409

Mano and Nutting Stone from 14SA409
Date: 1 CE-1500 CE
This mano and nutting stone was recovered from the surface of a Saline County camp site and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 2017. The site was occupied during the Upper Republican and Smoky Hill phases during the Early and Middle Ceramic periods. One side of this ground stone tool served as the topmost millstone for grinding foods by hand on a grinding stone. The other side of the tool served as a nutting stone, used for securing a nut while it was being cracked open. Groundstone tools like this one are made by pecking a hard stone into a rough shape and then grinding and polishing it into its final state.


Mano and Nutting Stone from the Curry Site, 14GR301

Mano and Nutting Stone from the Curry Site, 14GR301
Date: 1200-1400 CE
This combination mano and nutting stone, was recovered from the Curry site and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1984. One side of this ground stone tool served as the topmost millstone for grinding foods by hand on a grinding stone. The other side of the tool served as a nutting stone, used for securing a nut while it was being cracked open. Groundstone tools like this one are made by pecking a hard stone into a rough shape and then grinding and polishing it into its final state. The Curry site is a multicomponent (multiple occupations) village site in Greenwood County.


Mano from 14AT444

Mano from 14AT444
Date: 1-1000 CE
This sandstone mano was collected from a possible Early Ceramic period site in Atchison County. It was donated in 2018 to the Kansas Historical Society. Manos were the upper, hand-held millstone used for grinding foods and pigments.


Mano from 14DO314

Mano from 14DO314
Date: Unknown
This mano was once used as the upper, hand-held millstone for grinding foods and pigments. It was recovered at a site in Douglas County by Kansas Historical Society archeologists during an field survey for a road project.


Mano from 14DO317

Mano from 14DO317
Date: Unknown
This complete mano was recovered from a multicomponent (multiple occupations) archeological site in Douglas County. Manos were the upper, hand-held millstone used for grinding foods and pigments.


Mano from 14MY342

Mano from 14MY342
Date: 2000 BCE-1500 CE
This small mano was recovered from a site in Montgomery County with occupations in the Archaic, Early Ceramic, and Middle Ceramic periods. It was donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1972. Manos were likely used as the upper hand-held millstone for grinding foods and pigments.


Mano from 14RP315

Mano from 14RP315
Date: 1000 CE-1500 CE
This scarred and broken mano was recovered from an Upper Republican phase Middle Ceramic period site in Republic County. Manos were likely used as the upper hand-held millstone for grinding foods and pigments.


Mano from 14SA424

Mano from 14SA424
Date: 1-1500 CE
This mano was collected from the surface of a multicomponent (multiple occupations) site in Saline County and was donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 2017. The mano was likely used as the upper hand-held millstone for grinding foods and pigments. The mano was made by pecking a hard stone into a rough shape and then grinding and polishing it into its final shape. Later farming activities impacted the artifact, leaving what archeologists call plow scars.


Mano from a Kansa Site, 14SH302

Mano from a Kansa Site, 14SH302
Date: 1820-1848 CE
This mano, made of Kansas pipestone, was recovered from an archeological site in Shawnee County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1956. The mano was likely used as the upper hand-held millstone for grinding foods and pigments. The soft fine grain Kansas pipestone material enabled the mano's maker to shape and smooth the piece. Kansas pipestone is found in the glacial drift of northeast Kansas. The mano also shows plow scars, damage from farming activities. The site is the possible location of American Chief's Village, the smallest of three Kansa Indian Villages in Shawnee County.


Mano from Blue Earth Village, 14PO24

Mano from Blue Earth Village, 14PO24
Date: 1790-1830
This mano was recovered from the Blue Earth village site and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1880. Manos were used as the upper, hand-held millstone for grinding foods and pigments. This one was made of Sioux City quartzite. Blue Earth village was a Kansa Indian village in Pottawatomie County. Many lodge depressions were still visible on the surface in the 1880s.


Mano from Republic County

Mano from Republic County
Date: 1770-1800
This large mano was found near the Pawnee Indian Village site near Republic, Kansas by the University of Nebraska archeologists. The mano was donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1987. Manos were likely used as the upper, hand-held millstone for grinding foods and pigments.


Mano from the Blue Earth Village, 14PO24

Mano from the Blue Earth Village, 14PO24
Date: 1790-1830
This mano was recovered from the Blue Earth village site and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1880. Blue Earth village was a Kansa Indian village in Pottawatomie County. Many lodge depressions were still visible on the surface in the 1880s. Manos were likely used as the upper hand-held millstone for grinding foods and pigments.


Mano from the Tobias Site, 14RC8

Mano from the Tobias Site, 14RC8
Date: 1400-1700 CE
This mano was recovered from excavations during the 1977 and 1978 Kansas Archeology Training Program field schools at the Tobias site in Rice County. Manos were likely used as the upper hand-held millstone for grinding foods and pigments. This mano was only used on one side and has some damaging from farming activities. The Tobias site is a Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita) village that had dense artifact deposits, house remains, and numerous deep trash-filled storage pits. The site is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.


Mano from the Wullschleger Site, 14MH301

Mano from the Wullschleger Site, 14MH301
Date: 1-1800 CE
This mano was collected from the Wullschleger site in Marshall County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1961. Manos were used as the upper, hand-held millstone for grinding foods and pigments. This mano has one concave surface. The site was occupied periodically throughout the Early, Middle and Late Ceramic periods.


Manos from Riley County

Manos from Riley County
Date: Unknown
These two manos were likely used as the upper hand-held millstone for grinding foods and pigments. The complete mano was donated in 1880 and shows little use-wear. The broken mano was donated in 1986 and was made by pecking a hard stone into a rough shape and then grinding and polishing it into its final shape. It shows its frequent use by the smooth polish on the surface.


Manos from the Curry Site, 14GR301

Manos from the Curry Site, 14GR301
Date: 1200-1400 CE
Manos, stones used as the topmost millstone for grinding foods by hand on a grinding stone or metate, can come in different shapes and sizes. Manos like these are made by pecking a hard stone into a rough shape and then grinding and polishing it into its final state. These three were recovered from the Curry site and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1984. The Curry site is a multicomponent (multiple occupations) village site in Greenwood County.


Manos from the Neodesha Fort Site, 14WN1

Manos from the Neodesha Fort Site, 14WN1
Date: 1500-1800 CE
These two manos were collected from a Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita) village in Wilson County and donated in 1984 to the Kansas Historical Society. Manos were used as the upper, hand-held millstone for grinding foods and pigments. The Neodesha Fort site was first investigated by archeologists in 1954, and was associated with many lodge depressions and at one time had an U-shaped earthwork.


Manos from the Tobias Site, 14RC8

Manos from the Tobias Site, 14RC8
Date: 1400-1700 CE
These three manos were recovered from the excavations during the 1977 and 1978 Kansas Archeology Training Program field schools at the Tobias site in Rice County. Manos were likely used as the upper, hand-held millstone for grinding foods and pigments. The Tobias site is a Late Ceramic period ancestral Wichita village that had dense artifact deposits, house remains, and numerous deep trash-filled storage pits. It is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.


Manos from the Tobias Site, 14RC8

Manos from the Tobias Site, 14RC8
Date: 1400-1700 CE
These manos were recovered from excavations during the 2019 Kansas Archeology Training Program field school at the Tobias site in Rice County. Manos were likely used as the upper, hand-held millstone for grinding foods and pigments. The Tobias site is a Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita) village that had dense artifact deposits, house remains, and numerous deep trash-filled storage pits. The site is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.


Manos from the Wullschleger Site, 14MH301

Manos from the Wullschleger Site, 14MH301
Date: 1-1800 CE
These two manos were recovered from the Wullschleger site in Marshall County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1961. Manos were used as the upper, hand-held millstone for grinding foods and pigments. The site was occupied periodically throughout the Early, Middle and Late Ceramic periods.


Manos from the Wullschleger Site, 14MH301

Manos from the Wullschleger Site, 14MH301
Date: 1-1800 CE
These two manos were recovered from the Wullschleger site in Marshall County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1961. Manos were the upper, hand-held millstone used for grinding foods and pigments. The site was occupied periodically throughout the Early, Middle and Late Ceramic periods.


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