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Objects and Artifacts - Archeological Artifacts - Artifact Type - Modified Flake

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Artifact Collection from 14MT303

Artifact Collection from 14MT303
Date: Unknown
These 12 quartzite flakes represent a small lithic scatter that was recovered from a site in Morton County in the southwest corner of Kansas. Some of the flakes show further retouching, removing small flakes to thin, sharpen or further refine the chipped stone artifact.


Artifact Collection from 14SD341

Artifact Collection from 14SD341
Date: Unknown
Shown are four of the five items collected from the surface of a small lithic workshop site in Sheridan County. The site was discovered by Kansas Historical Society Archeologists in 1990. The artifact on the left is a large flake made from Smoky Hill silicified chalk, all of the others are modified flakes made of Smoky Hill silicified chalk, a chalcedony-like material, and Alibates flint from the Canadian River valley in the Texas panhandle.


Artifacts from a Lithic Workshop, 14GO405

Artifacts from a Lithic Workshop, 14GO405
Date: Unknown
Shown are some of the artifacts collected from a lithic workshop and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1986. Those shown here were all made of Smoky Hill silicified chalk and include scrapers, bifaces, and modified flakes. Smoky Hill silicified chalk is often referred to as Smoky Hill Jasper and numerous other names. The chert outcrops in Gove County and many other western and north central Kansas counties. Shown here are some of the wide variety of colors found in this chert.


Bifaces and Modified Flake from the Westerman Site, 14SM310

Bifaces and Modified Flake from the Westerman Site, 14SM310
Date: 1000-1500 CE
These four bifaces and one modified flake were just a few of those collected during contract archeology work at the Westerman site by Kansas Historical Society Archeologists. The Westerman site is a White Rock aspect Middle Ceramic Period village in Smith County. All of the material pictured here are Smoky Hill silicified chalk, a good quality knapping material that is exposed in linear beds in northwestern Kansas and western Nebraska.


Modified Obisidian Flake from the Woods Site, 14CY30

Modified Obisidian Flake from the Woods Site, 14CY30
Date: 1000-1500 CE
This modified flake of obsidian was recovered from a Clay County Middle Ceramic period village with at least two house. There is no natural source of obsidian in Clay County, so it was likely traded from a volcanic source such as the Yellowstone region of Wyoming or Taos, New Mexico. Archeologists are interested in what the artifacts, even the smallest of artifacts, can tell about how people used resources, moved across their landscapes and interacted with other groups.


Obsidian from the Majors Site, 14RC2

Obsidian from the Majors Site, 14RC2
Date: 1500-1700 CE
These three obsidian artifacts, one modified flake and two flakes, were recovered from the Majors site in Rice County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1982. There is no natural source of obsidian in Rice County, so it was likely traded from a volcanic source such as the Yellowstone region of Wyoming or Taos, New Mexico. The Majors site was a Great Bend aspect, Little River focus (ancestral Wichita) site that was occupied during the late 17th century based on southwestern pottery styles. Archeologists are interested in what the artifacts, even the smallest of artifacts, can tell about how people used resources, moved across their landscapes and interacted with other groups.


Obsidian from the Wullschleger Site, 14MH301

Obsidian from the Wullschleger Site, 14MH301
Date: 1-1800 CE
This modified flake was collected from the Wullschleger site in Marshall County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1961. The site was occupied periodically throughout the Early, Middle and Late Ceramic periods. There is no natural source of obsidian in Marshall County, so it was likely traded from a volcanic source such as the Yellowstone region of Wyoming or Taos, New Mexico. Archeologists are interested in what even the smallest of artifacts can tell about how people used resources, moved across their landscapes and interacted with other groups.


Tahlequah Modified Flakes from the Malone Site, 14RC5

Tahlequah Modified Flakes from the Malone Site, 14RC5
Date: 1432-1651 CE
These modified flakes were collected from the Malone village site in Rice County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1963. Tahlequah chert outcrops in eastern Oklahoma. Either a piece of the raw material or the modified flakes were traded into Kansas. The Malone site is a Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita) village that had dense artifact deposits and numerous deep trash-filled storage pits.


Yarmer Cache from 14BT479

Yarmer Cache from 14BT479
Date: Unknown
In 2013 Robert Yarmer donated 292 lithic artifacts that had been cached at a site in Barton County. A cache is a group of items stored or hidden for future use, for trade, or some other significance we today do not know. It is possible the cache dates to the Late Ceramic period. This cache contained bifaces, modified flakes, scrapers, knives, cores, and debitage. Predominately they were made of Permian chert, though a few were made of Smoky Hill silicified chalk, which outcrops in western Kansas. The lithic pieces shown here are a sampling of the large cache.


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