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Artifact Collection from 14OB302

Artifact Collection from 14OB302
Date: 1000-1500 CE
Sometimes even a small collection of artifacts can help Archeologists learn about what activities occurred at a site. For example, the artifact collection from 14OB302 only contains three artifacts: a flake, an endscraper and a pottery rim. The flake is of Smoky Hill silicified chalk, which outcrops in western Kansas. The endscraper, however, is made Florence chert, which outcrops in the Flint Hills to the east of Osborne county. Finally, a rim sherd from a ceramic vessel was also recovered. The collared rim was cord marked on the exterior and had a series of parallel lines on the interior. Archeologists can use the rim sherd to date the site to the Middle Ceramic period. Perhaps the people at the site used (or lost) the endscraper to process a hide, in addition to making and discarding a large flake of the local material.


Artifact Collection from 14SF301

Artifact Collection from 14SF301
Date: 1975
Shown is a slide, taken in 1975, of artifacts collected at the Comanche Archeological Site in Stafford County. The site was the location of a camp in a blowout (a depression created by wind erosion) within stabilized sand dunes. Archeologists consider the site to be multicomponent (multiple occupations) that was occupied periodically through the Early to Late Ceramic Periods (1 CE - 1800). Artifacts shown on the slide include bone, pottery sherds, chert knives and arrow points.


Artifact Collection from the Green Site, 14RY33

Artifact Collection from the Green Site, 14RY33
Date: 1500 BCE-1500 CE
This collection was donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1880 by Governor Nehemiah Green (1837-1890). The artifacts are likely from a site called 14RY33 as the donation records state they are from the Green site and 14RY33 was on property once owned by Governor Green. The small collection includes two vessel rims, two body sherds, and a large piece of daub (clay typically used to coat a structure which retains impressions of surrounding material). A single groundstone abrader, used for smoothing softer material, two scrapers and a knife or biface were also donated. Finally, seven projectile points, ranging in style from large dart points to a small notched arrow point were included. This collection reveals a site that was occupied periodically from the late Archaic to the Middle Ceramic periods. It may have had at least one structure and activities included cooking, hide processing and hunting.


Artifact Collection from the Krob Site, 14RP319

Artifact Collection from the Krob Site, 14RP319
Date: 1-1500 CE
Shown here are artifacts collected from the surface of the Krob site in Republic County. The site was occupied both in the Early and Middle Ceramic periods. Artifacts shown here include a corner notched arrow point fragment and two pottery sherds, both with sand temper and one with a cord marked surface treatment. One additional pottery sherd, the largest, was donated to the Kansas Historical Society. It also has a cord marked surface treatment.


Basket Impressed Pottery from the County Club Site, 14CO3

Basket Impressed Pottery from the County Club Site, 14CO3
Date: 1400-1725 CE
This small pottery body sherd has an interesting story to tell. This sherd was impressed with basketry, either as a decorative technique or to serve as a basket liner. The sherd was excavated from a Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita) village in Cowley County during Phase IV archeological investigations in 1995. The site had been much impacted by a water line, golf greens, roads, and highways. Excavations had been occurring at the site since 1916.


Beads from the Mem Site, 14MN328

Beads from the Mem Site, 14MN328
Date: 1500-1800 CE
These beads were excavated in 1986 during a highway salvage project undertaken by Kansas Historical Society archeologists and Kansas Anthropological Association volunteers at the Mem site. The black glass ovoid bead, of European manufacture, was recovered from the upper fill of a cache pit. The disc-shaped turquoise bead and the two ceramic beads were recovered from the same cache pit. The Mem site, in Marion County, is a Great Bend aspect, ancestral Wichita village.


Bears Grease Jar Lid from the Quindaro Site, 14WY314

Bears Grease Jar Lid from the Quindaro Site, 14WY314
Date: 1857-1863
This lid from a jar of Bears Grease hair conditioner was recovered from excavations at the Quindaro Townsite, an archaeological district now part of Kansas City, KS. The lid reads "Genuine BEARS GREASE (For T)he Hair PREPARED BY JULES HAUEL Perfumer 120 Chestnut St. PHILADELPHIA." Hauel was listed as being located at the 120 Chestnut Street address until 1854 when he moved. He continued to make the Bears Grease product until 1865.


Candlestick holder from Fort Hays, 14EL301

Candlestick holder from Fort Hays, 14EL301
Date: 1867-1887
This candlestick holder was excavated at Fort Hays in Ellis County. It was recovered in four pieces and reconstructed. Once someone's proud possession, the holder is quite colorful and has an unusual leaf shape.


Cedar Creek Site Rim Sherds from The Cedar Creek Site, 14DP1318

Cedar Creek Site Rim Sherds from The Cedar Creek Site, 14DP1318
Date: 2100 BCE-750 CE
Shown are three of many pottery sherds collected from the Cedar Creek site, in Doniphan County. They were donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1925. The Cedar Creek site was a multicomponent site, having both Kansas City Hopewell and Nebraska Aspect/Upper Republican occupations. The site had the remains of at least one house. The rim sherd on the far left is decorated with a cord wrapped stick impressed design with four bosses below. The rim sherd in the center has a crenellated rim and is like pottery of the Late Woodland or post-classic Kansas City Hopewell. The rim sherd on the right has a zoned area of cord marking. All the rim sherds are sand tempered.


Central Plains tradition Vessel from 14OT1

Central Plains tradition Vessel from 14OT1
Date: 1050-1400 CE
When the individual sherds of this vessel were reconstructed it showed it to be a typical Central Plains tradition pot. It was found in the remains of an earthlodge in an Indian village in Ottawa County. Vessels of this sort tend to be rounded or globular in shape, have a restricted neck and grit temper. A cord-wrapped paddle was used to make the roughened surface treatment of this otherwise undecorated pot. Archeologists used plaster to fill in the missing portions of the vessel.


Central Plains tradition Vessel from 14OT1

Central Plains tradition Vessel from 14OT1
Date: 1050-1400 CE
When the individual sherds of this vessel were reconstructed it showed it to be a typical Central Plains tradition pot. It was found in the remains of an earthlodge in an Indian village in Ottawa County. Vessels of this sort tend to be rounded or globular in shape, have a restricted neck and grit temper. A cord-wrapped paddle was used by the American Indians to make the roughened surface treatment of this otherwise undecorated pot. Archeologists used plaster to fill in the missing portions of the vessel.


Central Plains tradition Vessel from Saline County

Central Plains tradition Vessel from Saline County
Date: 900-1450 CE
This ceramic pot was found in Saline County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1962. When the individual sherds of this vessel were reconstructed, it showed it to be a typical Central Plains tradition pot. Vessels of this sort tend to be rounded or globular in shape, have a restricted neck and grit temper. A cord-wrapped paddle was used to make the roughened surface treatment. The collared rim was decorated below the lip with a series o of vertical tool impressions and finger pinching. Archeologists used plaster to fill in the missing portions of the vessel.


Central Plains tradition Vessel from Saline County

Central Plains tradition Vessel from Saline County
Date: 900-1450 CE
This ceramic pot was found in Saline County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1962. When the individual sherds of this vessel were reconstructed, it showed it to be a typical Central Plains tradition pot. Vessels of this sort tend to be rounded or globular in shape, have a restricted neck and grit temper. A cord-wrapped paddle was used to make the roughened surface treatment. The collared rim was decorated below the lip with a series of vertical tool impressions and finger pinching. Archeologists used plaster to fill in the missing portions of the vessel.


Ceramic Handle Sherd from the Tobias Site, 14RC8

Ceramic Handle Sherd from the Tobias Site, 14RC8
Date: 1400-1700 CE
This ceramic handle sherd was recovered during the 2019 Kansas Archeology Training Program field school at the Tobias site in Rice County. The handle sherd is decorated with three horizontal rows of punctates. The Tobias site is a Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita) village that had dense artifact deposits, house remains, and numerous deep trash-filled storage pits. It is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.


Ceramic Handle from the Wullscheleger Site, 14MH301

Ceramic Handle from the Wullscheleger Site, 14MH301
Date: 1500-1800 CE
This vessel handle was collected from the Wullscheleger site in Marshall County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1961. The strap style handle has sand temper and was attached at the rim of the vessel. The village site was occupied periodically from the Early Ceramic to the Late Ceramic periods.


Ceramic Handles from the Fanning Site, 14DP1

Ceramic Handles from the Fanning Site, 14DP1
Date: 1500-1800 CE
Shown are four vessel handles collected from the Fanning site, a protohistoric period Kansa village in Doniphan County, and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1925. All four handles are strap style. Both of the handle sherds on the top row are attached below the rim. On one a crack lace can be seen, used to repair the vessel by the owner. The two handle sherds on the bottom row are attached at the rim.


Ceramic Handles from the Sharps Creek Site, 14MP408

Ceramic Handles from the Sharps Creek Site, 14MP408
Date: 1500-1800 CE
These four ceramic handles were just a few of the many recovered from the Sharps Creek village in McPherson County during the 1993 Kansas Archeology Training Program. The large loop style handle on the far left and the small strap handle next to it were both attached to the vessel using rivets. The rivets were made of clay, and created by inserting a portion of the handle into a hole in the pot and then smoothing over the interior. The two wide strap handles on the right may have been attached by being molded onto the lip and the body of their vessels.


Ceramic Human Effigy from 14WY319

Ceramic Human Effigy from 14WY319
Date: 1880-1889
Shown is a representation of a Tesuque Rain God created in the 1880s. The artifact had been made for sale in the tourist trade near Santa Fe, New Mexico. It is unknown how it made its way to a site in Wyandotte County that was occupied from the Middle Ceramic period to the early Historic period.


Ceramic Pipe

Ceramic Pipe
Date: Unknown
This ceramic pipe was donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1962. The pipe's surface has a brown glaze that has blackened over the years, perhaps due to smoking. There is tobacco residue present in the pipe bowl's interior. When the pipe arrived in the collections of the Kansas Historical Society it either had no or had lost its provenience, its record of ownership. While this is disappointing it does not mean the pipe has lost all of its utility and value. It can still be used for teaching purposes.


Ceramic Pipe Bowl from 14SA409

Ceramic Pipe Bowl from 14SA409
Date: 1-1500 CE
This pipe bowl was recovered from the surface of a Saline County camp site and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 2017. The site was occupied during the Upper Republican and Smoky Hill phases during the Early and Middle Ceramic periods. The pipe retains faint traces of dottle (tobacco residue) within the bowl. The rim of the bowl was molded so as to flare outward.


Ceramic Pipe Bowl from the Markley Site, 14OT308

Ceramic Pipe Bowl from the Markley Site, 14OT308
Date: 1000-1500 CE
This reconstructed ceramic pipe bowl fragment was recovered from House 1 at the Markley site, a Smoky Hill Phase occupation site containing two or more houses. The collection from the site was donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1971. The pipe bowl was refit by the donor and has an incised line below the lip.


Ceramic Pipe Bowl from the Paint Creek Site, 14MP1

Ceramic Pipe Bowl from the Paint Creek Site, 14MP1
Date: 1500-1800 CE
This ceramic pipe bowl was found at the Paint Creek village in McPherson County, Kansas. There are no traces of tobacco residue within the bowl. The pipe bowl was donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1971. The Paint Creek site is part of the Little River focus of the Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita), whose people practiced fishing, hunting, gathering, and agriculture.


Ceramic Pipe Fragment from 14AT405

Ceramic Pipe Fragment from 14AT405
Date: 1-1000 CE
This ceramic pipe stem was collected from an Early Ceramic period camp site in Atchison County and donated in 1979 to the Kansas Historical Society. The pipe bowl is missing.


Ceramic Pipe Fragment from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1

Ceramic Pipe Fragment from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1
Date: 1650-1750 CE
This ceramic pipe fragment was recovered from the El Cuartelejo site in Scott County. The site, unique in Kansas, is the location of a seven room pueblo occupied by refugees from the Taos and Picuris pueblos in New Mexico in addition to Dismal River aspect groups (Apache). El Cuartelejo, also called the Scott County Pueblo, has been excavated and studied by many archeologists since 1898. The pipe was recovered during the 1976 Kansas Archeology Training Program. The fragment possibly represents a mouthpiece for a pipe or a fragment of a tubular style pipe called a "cloud blower."


Ceramic Pipe Fragments from the Hamon Site, 14JF350

Ceramic Pipe Fragments from the Hamon Site, 14JF350
Date: 500-1350 CE
These two ceramic pipe bowls were excavated at an archeological site in Jefferson County. The Hamon site was a Grasshopper Falls phase Early Ceramic period with Valley phase, Sterns Creek and Loseke Creek components (multiple occupations). The site was excavated in 1971 and 1972 by Kansas Historical Society archeologists and volunteers from the Kansas Anthropological Association.


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