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1880 census of Rock Creek Township, Wabaunsee County, Kansas

1880 census of Rock Creek Township, Wabaunsee County, Kansas
Creator: United States. Census Office. 10th census, 1880
Date: June 11, 1880
This excerpt of a census schedule provides details--including the name, age, race, and occupation--of settlers in Rock Creek Township in Wabaunsee County, Kansas. The county included a black population (B=Black) who had settled there in 1879 with the help of the Freedmen's Relief Association.


Amos Adams Lawrence to John Brown

Amos Adams Lawrence to John Brown
Creator: Lawrence, Amos Adams
Date: February 19, 1857
Amos Lawrence, Boston, sent John Brown $70 which had been donated by the people of East Jaffrey, New Hampshire, for Brown's "own personal use, & not for the cause in any other way than that. Lawrence did not believe Brown would receive much financial support from the National Kansas Committee: "the old managers have not inspired confidence, & therefore money will be hard for them to get now & hereafter."


Asa Peabody Blunt

Asa Peabody Blunt
Creator: Piper, S.
Date: Between 1880 and 1889
This is a cabinet card showing Colonel Asa Peabody Blunt who was an officer in the Union Army during the Civil War. He remained on active duty after the war, and attained the rank of brigadier general by brevet. Blunt was notable as commander of the 2nd Vermont Brigade. From 1877-1888, he was commander of the United States Disciplinary Barracks at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas.


Fremont Club banner

Fremont Club banner
Date: 1856
Banner was used in the Presidential campaign of 1856 by the Fremont Club of Lancaster, New Hampshire to show support for Kansas.


Interview on experiences in World War II

Interview on experiences in World War II
Creator: Orel, Harold
Date: September 18, 2007
Orel was inducted into the Navy in 1943 and served until 1946 on the U.S.S. Oklahoma City; Antietam; Missouri. Interviewed by Deborah Pye on Sep 18, 2007, Orel talked about military experiences in the Second World War. The 2005 Kansas Legislature passed a bill funding the WWII Veterans Oral History grant program. This transcript is from one of the community institutions receiving grants. The transcript of the interview is presented here; the original video copy of the interview is available through the Watkins Community Museum of History (Lawrence) and through the Kansas State Historical Society.


John E. Stewart reminiscence

John E. Stewart reminiscence
Creator: Stewart, John E
Date: c. 1856?
This undated document, presumably written by John E. Stewart, relates the author's experiences in Kansas Territory. The reminiscence begins with a description of how he entered the territory and the manner in which he constructed a house. Then, intermixed with accounts of his agricultural efforts and other day-to-day activities, there are brief mentions of the political situation in the territory. The main focus of the document then turns to when Stewart was a member of the Wakarusa Liberty Guard, including a description of the murder of Charles Dow, the murder of Hoyt, the Branson rescue, and other encounters with border ruffians.


John S. Brown to William Brown

John S. Brown to William Brown
Creator: Brown, John S.
Date: June 13, 1858
This letter, written from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, by John Stillman Brown, was addressed to his son, William Brown, who was studying at Phillips Exeter Academy in New Hampshire. The letter included information about their local church meetings and the talk surrounding the murder of Gaius Jenkins by James Henry Lane over a land dispute. Brown also mentioned a sermon he'd preached, which outlined the beliefs of the Unitarians. He admonished his son to immerse himself in the Scriptures, and to stop drinking tea and other stimulants. The letter concluded with a discussion of politics, particularly the Lecompton and Leavenworth Constitutions.


John Stillman Brown to William Brown

John Stillman Brown to William Brown
Creator: Brown, John Stillman, 1806-1902
Date: February 14, 1858
A letter written from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, by John Stillman Brown, addressed to his son, William Brown, who was studying at Phillips Exeter Academy. Brown admonished his son for not writing. He discusses the cold weather and the political conditions in territorial Kansas, including his opposition to the Lecompton Constitution. Brown predicted high immigration to Kansas in the coming spring, and also predicted that "Kansas is sure to be Free" and without any slaves within two years.


John Stillman Brown to William Brown

John Stillman Brown to William Brown
Creator: Brown, John S.
Date: June 21, 1857
This letter, written from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, is a tender, heartfelt piece of correspondence, speaking of the joys and triumphs of living in a new land. Brown enjoyed his time in Kansas, preaching at a local church and working on his claim. He outlined for his son, who was away at boarding school in New Hampshire, his typical day-to-day activities, which included cooking, gardening, and housekeeping. He also wrote of the currently peaceful state of affairs in Kansas.


Julia Hardy Lovejoy's diary

Julia Hardy Lovejoy's diary
Creator: Lovejoy, Julia Hardy, 1812-1882
Date: December 10, 1854 through January 5, 1860
Julia Louisa Hardy Lovejoy and her husband, Charles Lovejoy, came to the Kansas Territory in March, 1855. Lovejoy described the trip and their first months in Kansas Territory in her diary. The diary entries were fairly sporadic, however, so there were significant gaps in her account of life in the Kansas Territory. Lovejoy's writing was very emotional when describing the illness and death of their daughter Edith, when referring to the conflict in the territory, and when writing about her religious beliefs. The diary also contained some descriptions of Lovejoy's daily life. The Lovejoys had two older children (Charles J. and Juliette) and a five year old daughter, Edith, when they came to Kansas Territory. Their son Charles may have come to Kansas before the rest of the family. Edith died in Lawrence, Kansas Territory, on May 3, 1855. Julia was pregnant at the time and a son Irving was born September 17, 1855. Juliette married Dr. Samuel Whitehorn from Hudson, Michigan, on March 9, 1856, in Manhattan, Kansas Territory. Juliette died November 20, 1860, at Manhattan, Kansas, at the age of 21. See the biographical sketch in the "Personalities" section for more information about the Lovejoys.


Mary Bartlett Pillsbury Weston

Mary Bartlett Pillsbury Weston
Creator: Mettner's Studio, Lawrence, Kansas
Date: Between 1874 and 1884
This cabinet card shows Mary Bartlett Pillsbury Weston, (1817-1894), a professional and accomplished artist from New Hampshire who moved in 1874 to reside in Lawrence, Kansas. She captured the essence of Kansas and its "promising future" in an oil painting entitled "The Spirit of Kansas". The painting was created for the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago, Illinois, and it carried the message of how culture and civilization brought peace and progress to the state.


Mary Brown  to William Brown

Mary Brown to William Brown
Creator: Brown, Mary Ann Day , 1816-1884
Date: January 30, 1859
This letter, written by Mary Brown from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, was addressed to her brother, William, who was studying at Phillip Exeter Academy in New Hampshire. Mary and William were the children of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. The main focus of the letter is the story of how Dr. John Doy was captured by Missourians while aiding twelve fugitive slaves. Mary was convinced that someone had told the Missourians about the plan of escape. She also mentioned her father's religious work, and "Old" John Brown's work to free Missouri slaves.


Massachusetts and New England Emigrant Aid Companies, list of subscriptions to stock

Massachusetts and New England Emigrant Aid Companies, list of subscriptions to stock
Creator: New England Emigrant Aid Company
Date: May 1854 - June 1855
This volume includes lists of subscribers to shares of stock in the Massachusetts Emigrant Aid Company and the New England Emigrant Aid Company. The reports list the name of the subscriber, place of residence, number of shares, total value of shares, and when the subscriber paid for the shares. Subscribers included Amos A. Lawrence, Eli Thayer, Charles Francis Adams, Moses Kimball, and Charles Robinson. The volume also includes a list of donors to the company.


New England Emigrant Aid Company, Annual Meeting Minutes

New England Emigrant Aid Company, Annual Meeting Minutes
Creator: New England Emigrant Aid Company
Date: March 5, 1855 - May 29, 1860
Proceedings of the New England Emigrant Aid Company stockholders meetings. The meetings typically involved the election of officers, a treasurer's report, consideration of resolutions, and an assessment of the company's prospects in Kansas. The minutes for the first meeting of the New England Emigrant Aid Company (March 5, 1855) included the corporation by-laws.


New England Emigrant Aid Company special meeting minutes

New England Emigrant Aid Company special meeting minutes
Date: 1855
Official proceedings of a special meeting of the New England Emigrant Aid Company in Boston, Massachusetts.


Postcards from various state hospitals

Postcards from various state hospitals
Date: Unknown
Twenty-four colored postcards showing state hospitals from various states, including California, Kansas, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Mississippi, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Wisconsin.


Report of the minority, in report and testimony of the select committee to Investigate the causes of the removal of the Negroes from the southern states to the northern states, in three parts

Report of the minority, in report and testimony of the select committee to Investigate the causes of the removal of the Negroes from the southern states to the northern states, in three parts
Creator: United States. Congress. Senate. Select Committee on Negro Exodus
Date: 1880
This report, written by the minority party of the Senate select committee investigating the Exodus, outlines the minority's conclusions about the reasons for black emigration to the North during the Reconstruction period. This committee, composed of majority and minority parties, had taken testimony from hundreds of people having direct knowledge of the exodus movement. In essence, the minority party concluded that the Northern Republican Party and emigrant aid organizations had not persuaded blacks in the South to emigrate to the North. Instead, the unfavorable condition of life in the South had caused this mass exodus. The minority members were William Windom, a Republican senator from Minnesota, and Henry W. Blair, a Republican senator from New Hampshire.


Reuben A. Randlett to Ely Thayer

Reuben A. Randlett to Ely Thayer
Creator: Randlett, Reuben A.
Date: February 25, 1860
This letter concerns clothing sent from New England to "the poor of Kansas in 1856." R. A. Randlett of Topeka, Kansas Territory, wants to find out if Thayer's Emigrant Aid Company was involved in selling clothig that had been donated to go to needy settlers in Kansas. The clothing had been sold during the summer of 1857 "on a years time," according to Randlett, and now some men were trying to collect for it.


Sarah Brown to William Brown

Sarah Brown to William Brown
Creator: Brown, Sarah
Date: March 7, 1858
A letter written from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, by Sarah Brown, addressed to her brother, William Brown, who was studying at Phillips Exeter Academy. Sarah and William were the children of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. Sarah writes of her position as a local schoolteacher. The final part of her letter describes how she and others heard cannon fire outside and later discovered it was part of a celebration of Carmi William Babcock's election as mayor.


Testimony of A. A. Harris, in report and testimony of the select committee to investigate the causes of the removal of the Negroes from the southern states to the northern states, in three parts

Testimony of A. A. Harris, in report and testimony of the select committee to investigate the causes of the removal of the Negroes from the southern states to the northern states, in three parts
Creator: United States. Congress. Senate. Select Committee on Negro Exodus
Date: 1880
A. A. Harris, a white resident of Ft. Scott, Kansas, gave this brief testimony on March 29, 1880, before the Senate select committee investigating the causes of the Exodus. Harris described his contact with the black Exodusters in his area, including their difficulty finding employment. The committee also asked Harris to speak in some detail about the general treatment of African-Americans in Kansas, including any discrimination against them, particularly in the world of politics. This committee was composed of three Democratic senators and two Republican senators: Daniel W. Voorhees (Dem., Indiana), Zebulon B. Vance (Dem., North Carolina), George H. Pendleton (Dem., Ohio), William Windom (Rep., Minnesota), and Henry W. Blair (Rep., New Hampshire). Senators Blair and Vance asked the questions presented in this testimony.


Thomas H. Webb to J. S. Emery

Thomas H. Webb to J. S. Emery
Creator: Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866
Date: November 20, 1856
The letter indicatesthat J. S. Emery was duly authorized by the New England Emigrant Aid Company as an agent to organize state, county, and town associations in New Hampshire to provide aid to Kansas Territory. Webb suggests they follow the model established in Massachusetts. He also makes it clear that the state association would be responsible for paying Mr. Emery for his efforts in organizing New Hampshire.


Thomas Webb to J. S. Emery

Thomas Webb to J. S. Emery
Creator: Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866
Date: April 4, 1856
Thomas Webb of Boston, Massachusetts, writes J. S. Emery in Brandon, Vermont, to tell him of various places in Maine and New Hampshire that would like someone from Kansas to speak to them. Webb informs Emery that the group in New Hampshire is interested in securing recruits to go to Kansas, but that Emery's principal purpose is to raise money for the Relief Fund. He writes Emery that the sponsoring group should cover his expenses, that they should take contributions at any public meeting and that they should establish a committee for soliciting funds locally. Webb also describes an incident where Missourians seized a box they thought contained weapons, but it housed a rosewood piano. Webb also mentions that Charles Robinson was in Washington, D. C.


To the citizens of Missouri

To the citizens of Missouri
Creator: Brown, John Carter, 1797-1874
Date: September, 1855
Written by the directors of New England Emigrant Aid Company, this printed letter answers various charges made against the company by the citizens of Missouri.


William Brown to Sarah Brown

William Brown to Sarah Brown
Creator: Brown, William
Date: August 4, 1858
This letter, written from Ashley, Massachusetts, by William Brown, was addressed to his sister, Sarah Brown. William and Sarah were the children of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence, Kansas. William discussed his vacation from school at Phillips Exeter Academy. He expressed his anxiety about whether or not the Lecompton Constitution had been defeated, and worried that it may have succeeded due to presidential support for slavery.


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