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1880 census of Rock Creek Township, Wabaunsee County, Kansas

1880 census of Rock Creek Township, Wabaunsee County, Kansas
Creator: United States. Census Office. 10th census, 1880
Date: June 11, 1880
This excerpt of a census schedule provides details--including the name, age, race, and occupation--of settlers in Rock Creek Township in Wabaunsee County, Kansas. The county included a black population (B=Black) who had settled there in 1879 with the help of the Freedmen's Relief Association.


19th Annual Convention of the National Association of Colored Women

19th Annual Convention of the National Association of Colored Women
Creator: Dandridge, Deborah L., 1946-
Date: July 21-26, 1935
This panorama shows attendees of the convention of the National Association of Colored Women held July 21 to July 26, 1935. The signs on the building read "Mount Zion Temple" and "Mt. Zion Settlement School of Music, Kathleen Forbes." This appears to be Mt. Zion Congregational Church on E. 55th Street and Central Avenue in Cleveland, Ohio, where the organization held its 19th annual convention in 1935. Two women to the left side of the photo wear nursing uniforms. Three other women hold signs reading "Con" (presumably Connecticut), "Illinois," and "Ohio."


A. Oestreicher to Eli Thayer

A. Oestreicher to Eli Thayer
Creator: Oestreicher, A.
Date: September 23, 1854
Oestreicher, writing from Cincinnati, Ohio, informed Thayer of the establishment of a Kansas Actual Settler's Association in that city. He indicated that the association, which was comprised primarily of German-Americans, planned to create a settlement in Kansas in the spring of 1855.


A brief history of Caleb and Rebecca Harvey, missionaries in the Quaker Shawnee Mission in 1858

A brief history of Caleb and Rebecca Harvey, missionaries in the Quaker Shawnee Mission in 1858
Creator: Duvall, Dorothy
Date: August 23, 1940
This item, written by Dorothy Duvall, the granddaughter of Caleb and Rebecca Harvey, provides a four-page history of the Harvey's missionary experiences at the Quaker Shawnee Mission. Duvall explains that the Harvey's went to the Shawnee Mission in 1858 after leaving Springfield, Ohio. According to Duvall, Caleb Harvey was an agricultural teacher, and Rebecca Harvey "taught the girls household duties of every sort and how to sew."


Albert R. Greene to Franklin G. Adams

Albert R. Greene to Franklin G. Adams
Creator: Greene, A.R.
Date: August 18, 1897
In this letter to Franklin G. Adams, Albert R. Greene explains that he recently met with Charles C. Haynes, with whom he discussed the waning days of the Overland Stage. Greene explains that Haynes was old but that his eye was as "keen as when he ran the gauntlet of hostile Indians and brought his coach into the home station bristling with arrows."


Alfred "Alf" Mossman Landon

Alfred "Alf" Mossman Landon
Date: 1936
An informal portrait of Kansas governor Alfred "Alf" Mossman Landon, campaigning for President of the United States from a rail car in Canton, Ohio. Landon lost the 1936 presidential election to Franklin D. Roosevelt.


Alfred Mossman Landon at the 1936 Republican Convention

Alfred Mossman Landon at the 1936 Republican Convention
Date: 1936
This set of twelve photographs represent Alfred Mossman Landon at the 1936 National Republican Convention in Cleveland, Ohio. At this time, Landon accepted the party's nomination to run as the Republican nominee for the 1936 Presidential race against President Franklin Roosevelt.


Angell disc plow advertising pamphlet

Angell disc plow advertising pamphlet
Creator: Ohio Cultivator Company
Date: Between 1930 and 1935
This is a pamphlet for the Angell disc plow, invented by C. J. Angell (Charles John/Charlie John), a wheat farmer from Plains, Kansas. It was manufactured by the Ohio Cultivator Company in Bellevue, Ohio. It contains testimonials from the following men from Plains, Kansas: J. D. Golliher, D. B. Baty, Clyde Atkinson, and W. W. Coons


Anna Margaret Watson Randolph, diary

Anna Margaret Watson Randolph, diary
Creator: Randolph, Anna Margaret Watson, 1838-1917
Date: August 17, 1858 - August 22, 1858
This brief diary, kept by Anna Margaret (Watson) Randolph, begins with her move to Kansas in an entry dated August 17, 1858. These six entries at the beginning of her diary provide details about her family's journey from Ohio to Kansas Territory, included a number of interesting accounts of their journey on a riverboat. Their boat ran aground several times and, interspersed among her descriptions of these difficulties, Anna wrote about her sister Mary Jane, the weather, and her personal observances of other passengers. She also filled her diary with her frustrations and concerns during their arduous journey west.


Annals of Kansas, January - February, 1855

Annals of Kansas, January - February, 1855
Creator: Wilder, Daniel Webster, 1832-1911
Date: January, 1855 through February, 1855
D. W. Wilder's "Annals of Kansas," published in 1886, provides a day-by-day chronicle of significant events in Kansas. These are digital images of Annals of Kansas entries for the territorial period of 1854-1861.


Anti-Saloon League materials

Anti-Saloon League materials
Date: 1917
These materials relate to the Kansas Department of the Anti-Saloon League of America. Correspondence is primarily between State Superintendent W.J. Herwig and Reverend Milo G. Kelser, field manager at the Anti-Saloon League of America headquarters in Westerville, Ohio. Correspondence is also exchanged with Reverend Julius Smith and Professor O. G. Markham of Baldwin City. Travel itineraries, legislation, and the effects of World War I are frequent topics of conversation. The group sought to organize prohibition meetings in conjunction with Sunday church services around the state. Monthly financial reports are also included.


Anti-Saloon League materials

Anti-Saloon League materials
Date: 1918
This correspondence and financial documents are from the records of the Anti-Saloon League of Kansas. The majority of the letters are exchanged between Milo G. Kelser, field manager for the Anti-Saloon League of America located in Westerville, Ohio, and Rev. W. H. Herwig, superintendent of the Anti-Saloon League of Kansas. Other correspondents include Boyd P. Doty, assistant financial secretary for the Anti-Saloon League of America, H. T. Laughbaum, superintendent of the Anti-Saloon League of America, and Miss Nettie F. Corning, secretary for the Anti-Saloon League of Kansas.


Anti-Saloon League materials

Anti-Saloon League materials
Date: 1919
This correspondence and financial documents are from the records of the Anti-Saloon League of Kansas. The majority of the letters are exchanged between Milo G. Kelser, field manager for the Anti-Saloon League of America located in Westerville, Ohio, and Rev. W. H. Herwig, superintendent of the Anti-Saloon League of Kansas. Letters are also exchanged with Boyd P. Doty, assistant financial secretary for the Anti-Saloon League of America and assistant general manager of the American Issue Publishing Company, publishers for the Anti-Saloon League of America.


Anti-Saloon League materials

Anti-Saloon League materials
Date: 1920
This correspondence and financial documents are from the records of the Anti-Saloon League of Kansas, including mass mailings from Treasurer J. C. Mohler saying "we have just closed perhaps the most remarkable year in the history of the Prohibition Movement." Mohler solicited financial subscriptions to aid missionaries around the world and to uphold the National Prohibition Act, also known as the Volstead Act. There is also correspondence from W. J. Herwig, superintendent, of the Kansas Department, The Anti-Saloon League of America.


A party of patches

A party of patches
Creator: Judge Magazine
Date: June 6, 1891
This political cartoon drawn by Bernard Gilliam was copied from the satirical magazine Judge presents the Republican perception of the People's (Populist) Party. The artist depicts the People's Party as a hot air balloon made up of a patchwork of pieces, with each piece labeled with the name of the political organization or party that has been subsumed under the banner of the Populists. Some of the more recognizable "patches" include the Prohibition Party, the Greenback Party, the Farmer's Alliance, and the Knights of Labor Party. Inside the balloon's basket are two leading Populists from Kansas, William Peffer and "Sockless" Jerry Simpson.


A story of the Shawanoes (Shawnee)

A story of the Shawanoes (Shawnee)
Creator: Rayner, John Allen
Date: 1886
This reminiscence by George Bluejacket, a Shawnee (Shawanoe) Indian originally from Ohio, tells the creation story of the Shawnee people as well as the history of his own tribe. Although his story ends before the Shawnee were relocated to Kansas (then called Indian Territory), it appears that he relocated with the rest of his tribe. The reminiscence was recorded by John Allen Rayner, and the first page of the document is an explanatory letter written by Rayner.


Austin Smith to Jedediah Smith

Austin Smith to Jedediah Smith
Creator: Smith, Jedediah Strong, 1799-1831
Date: September 24, 1831
This letter is from Austin Smith to his father, Jedediah Smith, Sr. In the letter, Austin informs his father of the death of his brother, Jedediah Strong Smith, who was killed by Comanche Indians on May 27, 1831, near the Cimarron River.


Belinda C. Miles to Lewis Allen Alderson

Belinda C. Miles to Lewis Allen Alderson
Date: 1832-1834
These six letters were written to Lewis Allen Alderson from his sister-in-law, Belinda C. Miles. Alderson later moved to Atchison, Kansas, in 1858 and was a prominent Baptist minister. He died in Atchison in 1881.


Bleeding cup

Bleeding cup
Date: between 1840 and 1900
This bloodletting cup was owned by Dr. James Haller (1824-1908). Haller practiced medicine in Middletown, Ohio, in the 1840s and 1850s, and was a surgeon during the Civil War with the 38th Ohio Infantry from July 24, 1861 to Jan 4, 1865. He was promoted to Assistant Surgeon July 13, 1863. After the war, Dr. Haller and his family moved to Burlingame, Kansas where he continued to practice medicine. Cups were used to perform the medical treatment of bleeding. The glass cup was heated and placed on the skin. Its cooling created a vacuum, causing the skin to become red and swollen and signaling to the physician that the blood had risen to the surface of the skin. Then a lancet was used to release the "bad" blood from the body.


Blood lancet

Blood lancet
Creator: Wiegand and Snowden
Date: between 1820 and 1880
This brass lancet with wooden case was made by Wiegand and Snowden of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania sometime between 1820 and 1880. The brass lever on its side releases the blade. The donor claimed the lancet was used by Dr. James Haller, who practiced in Middletown, Ohio, in the 1840s and 1850s. He later was a surgeon with General William T. Sherman's army during the Civil War.


C. G. Dick to Samuel L. Adair

C. G. Dick to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Dick, Campbell Graham
Date: April 21, 1857
Campbell G. Dick was Reverend Adair's brother-in-law, and wrote from his home in Marshall, Highland County, Ohio, that he supported the American Missionary Association as it promoted Christianity, but was pessimistic about the chances for Kansas Territory entering the Union as a free state. He wrote that the Democratic party was controlled by the south, and asked Adair to inform him if free state men intended to vote in the elections called by the "Bogus Legislature."


C. G. Taylor to Lewis Allen Alderson

C. G. Taylor to Lewis Allen Alderson
Date: November 1832-September 1833
These two letters were written to Lewis Allen Alderson by his friend C. G. Taylor. In one of the letters, Taylor addresses Alderson's sister, Belinda C. Miles. Alderson later moved to Atchison, Kansas, in 1858 and was a prominent Baptist minister. He died in Atchison in 1881.


C. L. V. Bureau to Lewis Allen Alderson

C. L. V. Bureau to Lewis Allen Alderson
Date: January 1832-November 1832
These seven letters are addressed to Lewis Allen Alderson. They were written by his friend C. L. V. Bureau in Gallipolis, Ohio. Alderson later moved to Atchison, Kansas, in 1858 and was a prominent Baptist minister. He died in Atchison in 1881.


Candle lantern

Candle lantern
Date: between 1800 and 1850
This is a pressed and pierced tin candle lantern. Half-round lantern has clear glass pane beneath pierced conical top. Hinged metal door with snap latch opens to reveal candle socket on interior. Hiram C. Coville brought this lantern to Kansas Territory from Ohio. The Covilles were early settlers, landing first in Lawrence and quickly moving west to the Topeka area in 1855. Hiram was a soldier in the 2nd Kansas Militia, Company B, when he was killed during the Price Raid in 1864. His son, Allen, also used the lantern on the farm in Shawnee County.


Cary A. Trimble to Lewis Allen Alderson

Cary A. Trimble to Lewis Allen Alderson
Date: 1831-1833
These four letters are from Cary A. Trimble in Ohio to Lewis Allen Alderson in Virginia. Alderson later moved to Atchison, Kansas, in 1858 and was a prominent Baptist minister. He died in Atchison in 1881.


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