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A tribute to Dr. John R. Brinkley

A tribute to Dr. John R. Brinkley
Creator: Parmer, David
Date: Between 1936 and 1937
As the title indicates, David Parmer wrote this item about Dr. John R. Brinkley. Mr. Parmer lived in Columbus, Georgia. In 1933, Parmer had traveled to Villa Acuna, Doahuilla, Mexico, to introduce some entertainers on Brinkley's radio station XERA. Shortly after he returned to Georgia, Parmer's mother died. Mr. Parmer wites that he composed the tribute to Dr. Brinkley because this man whom he had just met sent condolences and flowers to Mr. Parmer. Parmer refers to Brinkley as a "noble man." The contents of this booklet were delivered on XERA by Mr. Parmer on February 2, 1936.


Creek Bowl

Creek Bowl
Date: Unknown
This complete Creek bowl was donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1915. The Creek Indians, also called the Creek Confederacy or the Muscogee, lived in southeastern America in Georgia, Alabama, North Carolina and Florida. The majority of the Creek people were later forcibly removed to Oklahoma. The bowl's rough surface has not been glazed or painted, but does show firing clouds, darkened areas on the surface of a vessel caused by uneven firing.


Creek Bowl

Creek Bowl
Date: Unknown
This complete Creek bowl was donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1915. The Creek Indians, also called the Creek Confederacy or the Muscogee, lived in southeastern America in Georgia, Alabama, North Carolina and Florida. The majority of the Creek people were later forcibly removed to Oklahoma. The bowl's rough surface has not been glazed or painted, but does show firing clouds, darkened areas on the surface of a vessel caused by uneven firing.


Dinner fork

Dinner fork
Date: between 1862 and 1864
A German silver dinner fork in the plain tipped handle pattern, dating from between 1862 and 1870. The donor's father, Winfield Scott Chapman, served with Company F of the 16th Iowa Infantry during the Civil War. Chapman may have acquired the fork when his regiment was stationed in Atlanta from June 8th to September 8th 1864. He used it until his regiment mustered out on July 19, 1865.


Ephraim Huested, petition for payment of claim

Ephraim Huested, petition for payment of claim
Creator: Huested, Ephraim
Date: July 21, 1859
This petition by Ephraim Huested was addressed to "the honorable Board of Commissioners appointed to audit claims." During the warfare of 1856, Mr. Huested had a horse stolen by a group of Georgians who were camped near Osawatomie, Kansas Territory. Mr. Huested had never received any sort of compensation, so he now requested 150 dollars for his loss. The document also contained a footnote by Nelson J. Roscoe, justice of the peace, who verified the legitimacy of the petition.


Harland Coffman baseball scrapbook

Harland Coffman baseball scrapbook
Date: January 1, 1948-December 31, 1952
This scrapbook documents the minor league baseball career of Topekan Harland Coffman. Coffman was a right-handed pitcher who played for several minor league teams between 1948 and 1952, including Independence (KS), Joplin, Columbus (GA), Omaha, Houston, Rochester, and Columbus (OH). In 158 minor league games, he achieved an overall record of 62-46, with an ERA of 3.19. His best season occurred in 1948 with the Independence Yankees, a club in the Class D Kansas-Oklahoma-Missouri League. Coffman's record that year was 18-5, with an earned run average of 1.94. His ERA was the best among all KOM League pitchers in 1948, and he was a league co-leader in number of wins, sharing the honor with two other pitchers. In 1952, Coffman participated in the St. Louis Cardinals' spring training camp, but did not make the team roster in the regular season. His professional playing days ended when he suffered an arm injury and opted not to have surgery recommended by doctors to extend his baseball career. After his minor league career, Coffman played several years with the semi-pro Topeka Decker Oilers. In the late 1940s and 1950s, the Decker Oilers were a perennial contender for the state semi-pro baseball title, competing each year in the state tournament held in Wichita. Harland's father Vern was the long-time manager of the Decker Oilers. Other family members who played with the team were Harland's brother Burton, and his uncles Ed and Junior Coffman. Harland was a lifelong resident of Topeka, and worked 34 years for the Topeka Capital Journal. He died in 2010 at the age of 81. Digital reproduction of the scrapbook was accomplished through a joint project sponsored by the Kansas Historical Society and the Shawnee County Baseball Hall of Fame.


Harland Coffman of the Columbus Cardinals in Columbus, Georgia

Harland Coffman of the Columbus Cardinals in Columbus, Georgia
Date: 1950
Topekan Harland Coffman is shown in this photograph from 1950, when he was a right-handed pitcher with the Columbus (GA) Cardinals, a Class A club in the South Atlantic League. His record that season was 17-11, with an ERA of 3.37. Coffman pitched for several minor league teams between 1948 and 1952. Besides Columbus, he also pitched for minor league teams in Independence (KS), Joplin, Omaha, Houston, Rochester, and Columbus (OH). In 158 minor league games, he achieved an overall record of 62-46, with an ERA of 3.19. His best year was 1948, when he went 18-5 for the Independence Yankees, an affiliate of the New York Yankees in the Kansas-Oklahoma-Missouri League. In 1952, he participated in the St. Louis Cardinals' spring training camp, but did not make the team roster in the regular season. His professional playing days ended when he suffered an arm injury and opted not to have surgery recommended by doctors to extend his baseball career. After his minor league career, Coffman played several years with the semi-pro Topeka Decker Oilers. In the late 1940s and 1950s, the Decker Oiler team was a perennial contender for the state semi-pro baseball title, competing each year in the state tournament held in Wichita. Harland's father Vern was the long-time manager of the Decker Oilers. Other family members who played with the team were Harland's brother Burton, and his uncles Ed and Junior Coffman. Harland was a lifelong resident of Topeka who worked 34 years for the Topeka Capital Journal. He died in 2010 at the age of 81. Digital reproduction of the photograph was accomplished through a joint project sponsored by the Kansas Historical Society and the Shawnee County Baseball Hall of Fame.


Henry Worrall

Henry Worrall
Date: 1881
A photograph of musician and illustrator Henry Worrall apparently taken in Atlanta in 1881.


Members of the 8th Kansas Volunteer Infantry

Members of the 8th Kansas Volunteer Infantry
Creator: Nichols, A. C.
Date: Between 1861 and 1865
This photograph was copied from an ambrotype showing members of the 8th Kansas Volunteer Infantry on Lookout Mountain, Georgia.


Orville Chester Brown to unknown

Orville Chester Brown to unknown
Creator: Brown, Orville Chester, 1811-1904
Date: September 2, 1856
This eloquent letter, presumably written by Orville Chester Brown, provides an example of the free state perspective on the events of 1856. It includes references to a number of key personalities and places that played a vital role during the struggle for Kansas. Brown writes that "Kansas is the scene of bloody strife," as "2000 armed men" from Missouri were rumored to have crossed into Kansas.


Prohibition in Kansas

Prohibition in Kansas
Creator: National Temperance Society and Publication House
Date: 1884
An address on prohibition in Kansas by Governor John P. St. John of Kansas and Governor A.H. Colquitt of Georgia, held in the Brooklyn Tabernacle, New York, on January 22,1882. This is essentially the same edition as unit 212721 printed in 1882 except for page 23 which includes an earlier list of new temperance publications.


Prohibition in Kansas

Prohibition in Kansas
Creator: National Temperance Society and Publication House
Date: 1882
Prohibition in Kansas speeches by Kansas Governor John P. St. John and Georgia Governor A.H. Colquitt, at the Brooklyn Tabernacle, on January 22,1882. This is essentially the same edition as unit 211546 printed in 1884 except for page 23 which includes a different list of new temperance publications.


Richard Mendenhall to Augustus Wattles

Richard Mendenhall to Augustus Wattles
Creator: Mendenhall, Richard
Date: January 19, 1857
Richard Mendenhall was a missionary at the Shawnee Friends Mission in the 1840s. He returned to Indiana for a time but moved back to Kansas Territory in the fall of 1855. He was in Kansas during the territorial era and wrote Wattles describing an attact on the Friends Mission on August 20, 1856 by proslavery forces. He indicated that they were told to leave or the mission would be burned. However, Mendenhall wrote that David Atchison and other proslavery supporters asked that the Friends be left out of the violence. Mendenhall also described an attempt to form a settlement by men from Georgia about 3 miles from Osawatomie. He wrote that they were friendly at first but they later committed depredations. In response, about 100 free state men ran them off, took $500 in clothing and provisions, and burned a fort they had built. Mendenhall believed that the Battle of Osawatomie was a response to this.


Serving spoon

Serving spoon
Creator: Hall & Elton
Date: between 1862 and 1864
A German silver dinner spoon in the plain tipped handle pattern, dating from between 1862 and 1870. Manufactured by Hall & Elton of Wallingford, Connecticut. The donor's father, Winfield Scott Chapman, served with Company F of the 16th Iowa Infantry during the Civil War. Chapman may have acquired the spoon when his regiment was stationed in Atlanta from June 8th to September 8th 1864. He used it until his regiment mustered out on July 19, 1865.


The White Wolf, or the Lous of Brittainy: A Drama in Five Acts by Kate Lucy Edwards Swayze

The White Wolf, or the Lous of Brittainy: A Drama in Five Acts by Kate Lucy Edwards Swayze
Creator: Swayze, J. C., Mrs
Date: March 16, 1859
This is a play titled "The White Wolf, or the Lous of Brittainy: A Drama in Five Acts" written by Kate Lucy Edwards Swayze. The play includes some stage directions and is part of a collection that consists of four handwritten play scripts.


Thomas C. Wells to Sarah Elizabeth Clarke Wells

Thomas C. Wells to Sarah Elizabeth Clarke Wells
Creator: Wells, Thomas Clarke
Date: April 3, 1856
After spending part of much of the winter back East, Wells returned to Kansas Territory in April, 1856, beginning this letter home from aboard the steamer "James H. Lucas" and finishing it on April 13 at Juniata, near Fort Riley, Kansas Territory. He comments on the trip by rail and boat and on the fact that there are "Quite a number of people on board from South Carolina and Georgia going to Kansas." But they would not last long, he states, and "The free state people must eventually conquer--the South cannot compete with the North in sending emigrants." Wells' plans upon his return are to sell his Juniata property and take one closer to Manhattan, Kansas Territory, which he describes as having done in a subsequent letter.


Two panaromic photographs of military groups:  Company A, 130th Field Artillery, 35th Division, World War I and one from World War II taken in Columbus, Georgia.

Two panaromic photographs of military groups: Company A, 130th Field Artillery, 35th Division, World War I and one from World War II taken in Columbus, Georgia.
Creator: Maurice Studios
Date: Between 1917 and 1945
The first panoramic photograph shows soldiers, probably World War II, taken in Columbus, Georgia, by Maurice Studios. The second panoramic shows Battery A, 130th Field Artillery, 35th Division, taken October 13, 1917, at Camp Doniphan, Oklahoma. Written in by hand is the phrase The Gang. All of the individuals are identified by hand, also, but the names are not always legible. The photographer was Willard.


United States army equipment

United States army equipment
Creator: United States Army Signal Corps
Date: April 1940
This photograph shows Caterpillar tractors and 155 mm guns on flatcars at the Fort Benning railhead, during the third army maneuvers, in Fort Benning, Georgia.


Virgil and Clark Barnes in Augusta, Georgia

Virgil and Clark Barnes in Augusta, Georgia
Date: 1928
This is a photograph of four individuals affiliated with the New York Giants. In this group of players are Virgil and Clark Barnes of Jackson County, Kansas. The photo is undated but likely was taken in March 1928 in Augusta, Georgia. Virgil Barnes was a right-handed pitcher with the Giants at the time. His brother Clark, also a pitcher, was invited to work out with the team during spring camp, but the tryout was cut short when Clark was hospitalized for an emergency appendectomy. Clark is pictured on the far right, with Virgil standing next to him on the left. The two others in the photo are unidentified. Four Barnes brothers--the sons of Luther and Sade Barnes--hailed from Circleville, Kansas, and all had major league aspirations. Jess and Virgil both pitched several years at the major league level. The two younger brothers, Charles and Clark, received tryouts with major league teams but did not make their rosters. At the time this photo was made, Virgil "Zeke" Barnes was nearing the end of his major league career, which included seven complete seasons in the 1920s. He pitched for the New York Giants for most of his career but was traded to the Boston Braves during his last major league season. Virgil's best year was 1924, when he had an ERA of 3.06 and a record of 16-10. He had 61 major league wins, with a career ERA of 3.66. He made World Series appearances in 1923 and 1924, including the starting assignment in Game 7 of the 1924 World Series.


W. R. Branham to the Kansas State Prison Commission

W. R. Branham to the Kansas State Prison Commission
Creator: Branham, W. R.
Date: March 20, 1925
Oxford, Georgia resident, W. R. Branham, writes the Kansas State Prison Commission of Topeka (Shawnee County) for information on the effect the abolition of capital punishment has had on murder rates in Kansas. Kansas abolished its first capital punishment law in 1907 and did not reinstate legal executions until the 1935. Prior to 1907, the state hanged nine persons under state law between 1863 and 1870. No state executions occurred between 1870 and 1932, although historians suggest that as many as ninety illegal executions (lynching) occurred in the state during that period. See William Eaton Hutchison to W. R. Branham, March 23, 1925.


Where Kansas stands

Where Kansas stands
Date: 1916
This good roads promotional brochure published by the Kansas Good Roads Association argues that Kansas' position as a national leader in farm production makes good roads a necessity.


William Easton Hutchison to W. R. Branham

William Easton Hutchison to W. R. Branham
Creator: Hutchison, William Easton, b. 1860
Date: March 23, 1925
Pardon Attorney Wm. Easton Hutchison of Topeka (Shawnee County) replies to Oxford, Georgia, resident W. R. Branham concerning the effect the state's abolition of capital punishment has had on murder rates in Kansas. Hutchison responds that he has no data on the subject and cannot tell whether there has been an increase or decrease in murder rates since the abolition in 1907. Hutchison considers the change in the law a change in name only since previous governors refused to carry out the execution order, he explains, making the original law ineffectual. Kansas abolished capital punishment in 1907 and did not reinstate legal executions until 1935. Prior to 1907, the state hanged nine persons under state law between 1863 and 1870. No state executions occurred between 1870 and 1932, although historians suggest that as many as ninety illegal executions (lynchings) occurred in the state during that period. See W. R. Branham to Kansas State Prison Commission, March 20, 1925.


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