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After twenty-one years:  the success story of Dr. John R. Brinkley

After twenty-one years: the success story of Dr. John R. Brinkley
Creator: Brinkley Hospitals
Date: 1930s
This booklet was published by the Brinkley Hospitals of Little Rock, Arkansas. Brinkley moved his hospital operations to Little Rock from Milford, Kansas, after his Kansas medical license was revoked. He changed the name of his radio station to XERA and it was located in Villa Acuna, Mexico, just across the border from Del Rio, Texas, where the Brinkley's had a home. The pamphlet is a revised version of an earlier Brinkley hospital publication titled Your Health (Kansas Memory item 210693). It includes illustrations to accompany the medical information.


Brinkley Hospital, Little Rock, Arkansas

Brinkley Hospital, Little Rock, Arkansas
Creator: Lippe Studio Del Rio, TX
Date: Between 1939 and 1949
View of the Brinkley Hospital at 20th and Schiller Avenue in Little Rock, Arkansas. The hospital was managed by Dr. John R. Brinkley, who was famous for advocating the use of goat gland transplants.


C. M. Moates to Governor Edward Hoch

C. M. Moates to Governor Edward Hoch
Creator: Moates, C. M.
Date: February 21, 1905
C. M. Moates, M.D. of Leavenworth (Leavenworth County) writes Governor Edward W. Hoch of Topeka (Shawnee County) concerning the segregation of Kansas City (Kans.) High School. Moates requests the Governor veto a bill recently passed by the Kansas Legislature which would segregate the school by building a separate building for black children. The letter reminds the Governor of the Republican Party's traditional stand for Negro rights, cites the dominance of the Republican Party in Kansas, and charges the Kansas Republican Party as behaving like Democrats. The letter notes that the Democratic dominated legislature in Arkansas was considering similar legislation. The letter also cites the efforts of John Brown and Daniel Reed Anthony to make Kansas a free state. Moates claims at some point the Republic Party will need Negro votes and that this law will drive Negroes from the party. He also claims high school segregation will incite trouble between the races. Governor Hoch signed the bill on February 22, 1905. See K. L. Browne to Governor Edward Hoch, February 18, 1905.


Carry Amelia Nation

Carry Amelia Nation
Date: Between 1900 and 1911
A portrait of temperance leader Carry Amelia Nation, 1846-1911, standing in front of Hatchet Hall, her home at 35 Steele Street in Eureka Springs, Arkansas.


Carry Amelia Nation's Hatchet Hall

Carry Amelia Nation's Hatchet Hall
Date: Between 1900 and 1910
A view of Hatchet Hall, home of temperance leader Carry Amelia Nation, 1846-1911, in Eureka Springs, Arkansas.


Carry Amelia Nation memorabilia

Carry Amelia Nation memorabilia
Date: 1911
A table with memorabilia from the life of temperance leader Carry Amelia Nation, 1846-1911, in front of Hatchet Hall, her home in Eureka Springs, Arkansas.


Dora McMahon

Dora McMahon
Date: Between 1861 and 1869
This is a carte-de-visite of Dora McMahon, possibly taken in Little Rock, Arkansas.


Dr. Brinkley's doctor book

Dr. Brinkley's doctor book
Creator: Brinkley Hospitals
Date: 1936
This booklet was published by the Brinkley Hospitals of Little Rock, Arkansas. Brinkley moved his hospital operations to Little Rock from Milford, Kansas, after his Kansas medical license was revoked. The cover of the booklet indicated that the Brinkley Hospitals are "for the treatment of enlarged and infected prostate glands, rectal and colonic diseases, varicose veins, hernia, or rupture." He changed the name of his radio station to XERA and it was located in Villa Acuna, Coahuila, Mexico, just across the border from Del Rio, Texas, where the Brinkley's had a home. This volume claims that XERA is the most powerful radio station in the world. The pamphlet is a revised version of an earlier Brinkley hospital publication titled Your Health (Kansas Memory item 210693). It includes illustrations to accompany the medical information. There are some editing marks so this copy may have been used to plan a revision. It is an expansion of the information contained in "After Twenty One Years" (Kansas Memory item 213226).


Fayetteville road

Fayetteville road
Date: Between 1900 and 1910
These letters, maps, and reminiscences relate to the Fayetteville road, also known as the Fayetteville Emigrant Trail. This trail started at Arkansas Post in Arkansas, then headed towards the northeast corner of Oklahoma, crossing the Neosho River, entering the state of Kansas in what is now Montgomery County. The trail crossed the Verdigris River about two miles north of the Kansas state line, went through the present-day site of Coffeyville making its way northwest, finally meeting with the Santa Fe Trail at Turkey Creek in McPherson County, Kansas. In total, this trail crossed the following Kansas counties: Montgomery, Chautauqua, Elk, Butler, Harvey, Marion and McPherson.


Glenn and Ruth Cunningham letters to Robert and Elaine Keller

Glenn and Ruth Cunningham letters to Robert and Elaine Keller
Creator: Cunningham, Glenn, 1909-1988
Date: 1973-1975
Six letters and one newsletter from Glenn and Ruth Cunningham to Robert and Elaine Keller, Reeds Spring and Springfield, Missouri. Five of the letters and the newsletter are written from Plainview, Arkansas, and one letter from Augusta, Kansas. Cunningham had youth ranches for troubled teenagers in both of these locations. In the letters, Cunningham talks about the youth ranches and thanks the Kellers for monetary and clothing donations. The collection also includes an article, "The Glenn Cunningham Story: Never Say Die" by Jesse Owens, published in The Saturday Evening Post, April 1976. Cunningham was most famous for his skill as a miler. For three years, from 1932 thru 1934, he won the Big Six indoor titles, and he competed at the Olympics in 1932 and 1936. Then in 1938 Cunningham became the world's fastest miler when he set a new record at Dartmouth College. That same year he also received a doctorate degree from New York University.


Henry A. Strong correspondence

Henry A. Strong correspondence
Creator: Strong, Henry A.
Date: December 24, 1860-August 10, 1865
Henry Strong wrote these letters to Otis B. Strong of Huntsburg, Ohio. Strong was in Company K, 12th Regiment, Kansas Volunteers from Paola, Kansas, during the Civil War. The letters were written from various places: Moneka, Kansas; Little Rock, Arkansas; Camp Blunt, Paola, Kansas; Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, Kansas City, Missouri; Osawatomie, Kansas; Fort Smith, Arkansas; Chattanooga, Tennessee; Mansfield, Kansas; Fort Gibson, Cherokee Nation. The letters address Strong's activities as a Kansas volunteer during the Civil War.


Indian Territory, with parts of Neighborning States and Territories

Indian Territory, with parts of Neighborning States and Territories
Creator: Hunnius, Ado, 1842-1923
Date: September 1869
This map drawn by Ado Hunnius at the request of Major General J.M. Schofield was compiled under the direction of 1st Lieutenant Henry Jackson, 7th U.S. Cavalry. The chief engineer was Bvt. Major General A.A. Humphreys. The map illustrates the locations of forts, rivers, Indian tribes and reservations in the Indian Territory (Oklahoma). The neighboring states include: southern Kansas, northern Texas, western Missouri, western Arkansas and the territories of New Mexico, and Colorado


Interview on experiences in World War II

Interview on experiences in World War II
Creator: Graham, William Homer
Date: September 25, 2000
Graham was inducted into the Army (Infantry) in 1945 and served until 1945. Interviewed by Pattie Johnston on Sep 25, 2000, Graham talked about military experiences in the Second World War. The 2005 Kansas Legislature passed a bill funding the WWII Veterans Oral History grant program. This transcript is from one of the community institutions receiving grants. The transcript of the interview is presented here; the original video copy of the interview is available through the Watkins Community Museum of History (Lawrence) and through the Kansas State Historical Society.


Interview on experiences in World War II

Interview on experiences in World War II
Creator: Woody, Travis
Date: 18 November 2005
Sergeant Woody enlisted in the WAC: Women's Army Corps in 1943 and served until 1945. Interviewed by Joyce Suellentrop on Nov 18, 2005, Woody talked about military experiences in the Second World War. The 2005 Kansas Legislature passed a bill funding the WWII Veterans Oral History grant program. This transcript is from one of the nine community institutions that received these grants. The transcript from the interview is presented here; the original audio copy of the interview is available through the Gray County Veterans Memorial & Archives and through the Kansas State Historical Society.


J. L. Palmer to Governor John St. John

J. L. Palmer to Governor John St. John
Creator: Palmer, J. L.
Date: May 08, 1880
This letter to Kansas Governor St. John is from J. L. Palmer of Little Rock, Arkansas. Mr. Palmer offers his views on a meeting place for the next Annual Convention, and laments the difficulties faced by the poor people of his region, struggling against "a wealthy organized whiskey ring." The letter is written on stationery for the Auditor's Office, State of Arkansas. Palmer was involved in the temperance movement.


J.L. Palmer to Governor John St. John

J.L. Palmer to Governor John St. John
Creator: Palmer, J.L.
Date: January 01, 1880
Kansas Governor St. John is apprised of the Christian Temperance Union of Arkansas Convention, to be held January 27, 1880, in Little Rock. After declaring his wish that the convention "will strike terror and confusion into the ranks of the enemy", Palmer, president of the State Christian Temperance Union of Arkansas, quotes their motto "with malice towards none and charity for all!"


James Fleming Fagan

James Fleming Fagan
Date: Between 1859 and 1865
This black and white photograph shows Confederate general James Fleming Fagan, (1828-1893). Fagan began his military career serving in the Mexican-American War, (1846-1848), with the Arkansas Mounted Volunteers. He eventually rose to the rank of lieutenant before mustering out the army and returning to Arkansas. From 1852 to 1853, he served in the Arkansas House of Representatives and one term in the state senate, 1860-1862. With the start of the Civil War Fagan placed his political career on hold and resumed his military career. He was instrumental in being the first in the state of Arkansas to recruit and organize a group of volunteers for service; he later accepted the appointed of captain of the unit. When the regiment was reassigned in May of 1861 as the 1st Arkansas Infantry Regiment, Fagan was made colonel. During the war he was involved in a number of battles from the Battle of Bull Run to the Battle of Shiloh. His effective leadership skills and military strategies allowed for him to move up in the ranks. On September 12, 1862, Fagan was promoted brigadier general. He transferred to the Trans-Mississippi District where he lead troops into a number of battles from Prairie Grove to Cane Hill. The success from these campaign's promoted Fagan, on April 25, 1864, to major general. Under General Sterling Price's command, Fagan help lead the last cavalry of troops into Missouri. At the Battle of Mine Creek Fagan's division was overwhelmed by Union forces that his troops retreated from the area. In the final months of the war Fagan finished out his military career as commander of the District of Arkansas of the Trans-Mississippi Department. His long and successful military career came to a close on June 20, 1865. In 1875 President Ulysses S. Grant appointed Fagan as a United States Marshal for the Western District of Arkansas. A position he held until 1877 before accepting the role of receiver for the Land Office in Little Rock, Arkansas where he served until 1890. Fagan's service to the people of Arkansas came to an end on September 1, 1893 when he passed away at the age of sixty-five in Little Rock, Arkansas. Burial was conducted in Mount Holly Cemetery.


James Montgomery to George L. Stearns

James Montgomery to George L. Stearns
Creator: Montgomery, James, 1814-1871
Date: October 6, 1860
Having returned from a trip to the East (where he visited George Stearns, Horace Greeley, and others in Boston, New York, and Philadelphia), Montgomery writes from Mound City, Linn County, Kansas Territory, that he "found the people greatly excited." News of violence directed against free state men in Texas and Arkansas has awakened Kansans' sense of urgency, as Montgomery continues his efforts to free slaves and undercut the slave economy of western Missouri.


John Brinkley's Sunday evening talk: beware of propaganda and the war in Europe

John Brinkley's Sunday evening talk: beware of propaganda and the war in Europe
Creator: Brinkley, John Richard, 1885-1942
Date: March 10, 1940
This is an audio recording of John Brinkley's Sunday evening radio broadcast from Little Rock, Arkansas. In part one he talks about his childhood in North Carolina, government propaganda and the war in Europe. Brinkley discusses the suffering inflicted by war and the moral courage it takes to denounce war. In part two Brinkley discusses the need for a wholesome environment and the importance of morals. Brinkley asks people to acquaint themselves with the truths of the Bible. He promotes Publicity Newspaper, a patriotic newspaper published by Mr. Garner, Wichita, Kansas. The newspaper reprinted Brinkley's Sunday Evening Talk program. Brinkley announces that he has discontinued his anti-war discussions since the nation was considering entering the war. At the end of the broadcast, he talks about medical issues and encourages people to come to the Brinkley Hospital in Little Rock.


John Brinkley's health series: potential death risk of advanced prostate cases

John Brinkley's health series: potential death risk of advanced prostate cases
Creator: Brinkley, John Richard, 1885-1942
Date: 1939
An audio recording of John R. Brinkley's radio program broadcast from Little Rock, Arkansas. Brinkley addresses the health issues related to advanced prostate disease. In the broadcast, he reads letters from several patients recommending Brinkley's medical treatment. He promotes two medical books which people could receive by writing him a letter. Along with receiving books, he asked people to complete a questionnaire and submit the names of men that would benefit from his treatment.


John R. Brinkley's country club hospital in Little Rock, Arkansas

John R. Brinkley's country club hospital in Little Rock, Arkansas
Creator: Lippe Studio Del Rio, TX
Date: Between 1939 and 1949
This native stone building was the former Shrine Country Club in Little Rock, Arkansas before its transformation into a hospital owned by Dr. John R. Brinkley. The hospital grounds were comprised of 360 acres and included a 18-hole golf course.


John R. Brinkley to Wallace Davis

John R. Brinkley to Wallace Davis
Creator: Brinkley, John Richard, 1885-1942
Date: January 10, 1942
A letter written by Dr. John R. Brinkley to Wallace Davis, attorney. In this letter to his attorney, Brinkley outlines the difficulties he and Minnie Brinkley are experiencing. He discusses the razing of XERA radio station, bankruptcy, his declining health, and the federal indictment.


Johnny Adams, Hall of Fame jockey from Iola, Kansas

Johnny Adams, Hall of Fame jockey from Iola, Kansas
Date: Between 1945 and 1958
Johnny Adams was a Hall of Fame jockey whose career spanned the period 1935-1958. During that time, he had 20,159 mounts, including 3,270 winners. Adams was born in Carlisle, Arkansas, and moved with his family to Iola, Kansas as a small boy. He rode his first race in Uniontown, Kansas in 1929. By 1937, he was the nation's leading jockey--a feat he repeated in 1942 and 1943. Another career highlight came in 1954, when he won the Preakness with Hasty Road. In 1955, Adams became the fourth jockey to reach the 3,000 win mark. In 1961, he was a charter inductee in the Kansas Sports Hall of Fame. He was inducted into the National Racing Hall of Fame in 1965. Johnny Adams died in Arcadia, California in 1995.


Kansas Adjutant General general correspondence

Kansas Adjutant General general correspondence
Creator: Kansas. Adjutant General's Office
Date: 1864
This is correspondence sent and received by the Kansas Adjutant General's Office. Cyrus K. Holliday succeeded Guilford Dudley as Adjutant General in May 1864. Topics of this correspondence include hospital reports from Fort Scott, requests for more appointments of medical officers, transmittal of muster rolls, a list of volunteers from Wisconsin who enlisted in Kansas, and letters from Elizabeth Pearsons Clouse inquiring about her son, Benjamin Franklin Pearsons. Correspondence was frequently exchanged with Lieutenant J.R. Kemble, General John B. Gray, Assistant Provost Marshal Sidney Clarke, Provost Marshal James McCahon, and Provost Marshal A.J. Shannon. Also included are letters from newspaper publishers requesting payment for printing General and Special Orders, including a young Marshall M. Murdock from the Burlingame Chronicle. A letter dated January 31, 1864 from President Abraham Lincoln orders the draft of 500,000 men. A searchable, full-text version of this correspondence is available by clicking "Text Version" below.


Kansas City, Lawrence and Southern Railroad

Kansas City, Lawrence and Southern Railroad
Creator: Kansas City, Lawrence & Southern Railroad
Date: 1880
Map and timetable of the Kansas City, Lawrence and Southern Railroad lines in Kansas and neighboring states. The company advertised itself as the shortest and fastest route from Kansas City to Winfield and Wellington. The company also sold acres of farmland in the Neosho Valley.


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