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Governor Mike Hayden Interview
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Date - 1990s - 1992

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Aerial views of Fort Hays, Kansas

Aerial views of Fort Hays, Kansas
Creator: Kansas State Historical Society
Date: June 1992
Four aerial photographs of Fort Hays, Kansas. Fort Hays was an important U.S. Army post that was active from 1865 until 1889. Today four original buildings survive: the blockhouse (completed as the post headquarters in 1868), guardhouse, and two officers' quarters. After its closing in 1889 the land and buildings of Fort Hays were turned over to the Department of the Interior, which later transferred them to the state of Kansas in 1900. When Frontier Historical Park was opened at the site in 1929, only the blockhouse and guardhouse remained of the original fort buildings. The two officers' quarters had been sold at auction in 1902 and moved into town at the time the other buildings were being sold for scrap. The officers' quarters were relocated in 1964 and 1987. The visitor center was built in 1967. Today it operates as Fort Hays State Historic Site; it was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971.


Aerial views of Fort Hays, Kansas

Aerial views of Fort Hays, Kansas
Creator: Kansas State Historical Society
Date: June 1992
Several aerial views of Fort Hays, Kansas. Fort Hays was an important U.S. Army post that was active from 1865 until 1889. Today four original buildings survive: the blockhouse (completed as the post headquarters in 1868), guardhouse, and two officers' quarters. After its closing in 1889 the land and buildings of Fort Hays were turned over to the Department of the Interior, which later transferred them to the state of Kansas in 1900. When Frontier Historical Park was opened at the site in 1929, only the blockhouse and guardhouse remained of the original fort buildings. The two officers' quarters had been sold at auction in 1902 and moved into town at the time the other buildings were being sold for scrap. The officers' quarters were relocated in 1964 and 1987. The visitor center was built in 1967. Today it operates as Fort Hays State Historic Site; it was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971.


American Legion baseball team from Silver Lake, Kansas

American Legion baseball team from Silver Lake, Kansas
Date: 1992
This photograph from 1992 shows the American Legion Post 160 baseball team from Silver Lake, Kansas. The team won the Class AA American Legion state championship by defeating Baxter Springs, 11-2, in the title game played in Ottawa. In the front are (l to r): Derek Bahner; Scott Wichman; Robert Nordyke; Lance Smith; Blake Smith; Jason Allen; Justin Shaw; and, Jason Hogle. In the back are (l to r): Jess Adams (head coach); Colin Russell (assistant coach); Mark Keller; Brad Lindstrom; Jody Mitchell; Michael Walker; Matthew Harrington; Shawn Denton; Mike Burton (manager); and, Will Burton (assistant coach). Digital reproduction of the photo was accomplished through a joint project sponsored by the Kansas Historical Society and the Shawnee County Baseball Hall of Fame.


Authors' receptions at the Menninger Clinic in Topeka, Kansas

Authors' receptions at the Menninger Clinic in Topeka, Kansas
Date: 1986-1994
Photographs from various receptions in honor of the many publications by Menninger staff. The Menninger Clinic remains one of the primary North American settings supporting psychodynamically informed research on clinical diagnosis, assessment, and treatment.


Capitol, Topeka, Kansas

Capitol, Topeka, Kansas
Creator: Worley, Barry John, 1949-
Date: October 1992
This black and white photograph shows a north view of the capitol in Topeka, Kansas. Located on twenty acres of land once owned by Cyrus K. Holliday, work began on the capitol October 17, 1866, when the cornerstone was laid for the east wing. Thirty-seven years later the statehouse, an example of French Renaissance architecture and Corinthian details, was completed at total cost of $3,200,588.92. The Kansas Legislature meets in the building and the office of the Governor is in the structure as well. For many years, the Kansas Supreme Court was housed in the Capitol, also.


Capitol, Topeka, Kansas

Capitol, Topeka, Kansas
Creator: Worley, Barry John, 1949-
Date: June 1992
This black and white photograph shows a northeast view of the capitol in Topeka, Kansas. Located on twenty acres of land, once owned by Cyrus K. Holliday, work began on the capitol October 17, 1866, when the cornerstone was laid for the east wing. Thirty-seven years later the statehouse, an example of French Renaissance architecture and Corinthian details, was completed at total cost of $3,200,588.92. The Kansas Legislature meets in the building and the office of the Governor is in the structure as well. For many years, the Kansas Supreme Court was housed in the Capitol, also.


Capitol, Topeka, Kansas

Capitol, Topeka, Kansas
Creator: Worley, Barry John, 1949-
Date: October 1992
This black and white photograph shows an east view of the capitol in Topeka, Kansas. Located on twenty acres of land, once owned by Cyrus K. Holliday, work began on the capitol October 17, 1866, when the cornerstone as laid for the east wing. Thirty-seven years later the statehouse, an example of French Renaissance architecture and Corinthian details, was completed at a total cost of $3,200,588.92. The Kansas Legislature meets in the building and the office of the Governor is in the structure as well. For many years, the Kansas Supreme Court was housed in the Capitol, also.


Capitol, Topeka, Kansas

Capitol, Topeka, Kansas
Creator: Worley, Barry John, 1949-
Date: October 1992
This black and white photograph shows a southeast view of the capitol in Topeka, Kansas. Located on twenty acres of land, once owned by Cyrus K. Holliday, work began on the capitol October 17, 1866, when the cornerstone was laid for the east wing. Thirty-seven years later the statehouse, an example of French Renaissance architecture and Corinthian details, was completed at a total cost of $3,200,588.92. The Kansas Legislature meets in the building and the office of the Governor is in the structure as well. For many years, the Kansas Supreme Court was housed in the Capitol, also.


Capitol, Topeka, Kansas

Capitol, Topeka, Kansas
Creator: Worley, Barry John, 1949-
Date: October 1992
This black and white photograph shows a southeast view of the Capitol in Topeka, Kansas. Located on twenty acres of land, once owned by Cyrus K. Holliday, work began on the capitol October 17, 1866, when the cornerstone was laid for the east wing. Thirty-seven years later the statehouse, an example of French Renaissance architecture and Corinthian details, was competed at a total cost of $3,200,588.92. The Kansas Legislature meets in the building and the office of the Governor is in the structure as well. For many years, the Kansas Supreme Court was housed in the Capitol, also.


Capitol, Topeka, Kansas

Capitol, Topeka, Kansas
Creator: Worley, Barry John, 1949-
Date: October 1992
This black and white photograph shows a southwest view of the capitol in Topeka, Kansas. Located on twenty acres of land, once owned by Cyrus K. Holliday, work began on the capitol October 17, 1866, when the cornerstone was laid for the east wing. Thirty-seven years later the statehouse, an example of French Renaissance architecture and Corinthian details, was completed at a total cost of $3,200,588.92. The Kansas Legislature meets in the building and the office of the Governor is in the structure as well. For many years, the Kansas Supreme Court was housed in the Capitol, also.


Capitol, Topeka, Kansas

Capitol, Topeka, Kansas
Creator: Worley, Barry John, 1949-
Date: October 1992
This black and white photograph shows a southeast view of the capitol in Topeka, Kansas. Located on twenty acres of land, once owned by Cyrus K. Holliday, work began on the capitol October 17, 1866, when the cornerstone was laid for the east wing. Thirty-seven years later the statehouse, an example of French Renaissance architecture and Corinthian details, was competed at a total cost of $3,200,588.92. The Kansas Legislature meets in the building and the office of the Governor is in the structure as well. For many years, the Kansas Supreme Court was housed in the Capitol, also.


Capitol, Topeka, Kansas

Capitol, Topeka, Kansas
Creator: Worley, Barry John, 1949-
Date: October 1992
This black and white photograph shows a southwest view of the capitol in Topeka, Kansas. Located on twenty acres of land, once owned by Cyrus K. Holliday, work began on the capitol October 17, 1866, when the cornerstone was laid for the east wing. Thirty-seven years later the statehouse, an example of French Renaissance architecture and Corinthian details, was completed at a total cost of $3,200,588.92. The Kansas Legislature meets in the building and the office of the Governor is in the structure as well. For many years, the Kansas Supreme Court was housed in the Capitol, also.


Capitol, Topeka, Kansas

Capitol, Topeka, Kansas
Creator: Worley, Barry John, 1949-
Date: October 1992
This black and white photograph shows a west view of the capitol in Topeka, Kansas. Located on twenty acres of land, once owned by Cyrus K. Holliday, work began on the capitol October 17, 1866, when the cornerstone was laid for the east wing. Thirty-seven years later the statehouse, an example of French Renaissance architecture and Corinthian details, was completed at a total cost of $3,200,588.92. The Kansas Legislature meets in the building and the office of the Governor is in the structure as well. For many years, the Kansas Supreme Court was housed in the Capitol, also.


Capitol, Topeka, Kansas

Capitol, Topeka, Kansas
Creator: Worley, Barry John, 1949-
Date: October 1992
This black and white photograph shows a southeast view of the capitol in Topeka, Kansas. Located on twenty acres of land, once owned by Cyrus K. Holliday, work began on the capitol October 17, 1866, when the cornerstone was laid for the east wing. Thirty-seven years later the statehouse, an example of French Renaissance architecture and Corinthian details, was completed at a total cost of $3,200,588.92. The Kansas Legislature meets in the building and the office of the Governor is in the structure as well. For many years, the Kansas Supreme Court was housed in the Capitol, also.


Capitol, Topeka, Kansas

Capitol, Topeka, Kansas
Creator: Worley, Barry John, 1949-
Date: October 1992
This black and white photograph shows a south view of the capitol in Topeka, Kansas. Located on twenty acres of land, once owned by Cyrus K. Holliday, work began on the capitol October 17, 1866, when the cornerstone was laid for the east wing. Thirty-seven years later the statehouse, an example of French Renaissance architecture and Corinthian details, was completed at a total cost of $3,200,588.92. The Kansas Legislature meets in the building and the office of the Governor is in the structure as well. For many years, the Kansas Supreme Court was housed in the Capitol, also.


Charles I. Baston interview

Charles I. Baston interview
Creator: Baston, Charles I.
Date: May 14, 1992
Charles Baston was born in Lee's Summit, Missouri, on April 24, 1917. He attended grade school and junior high school while still living in Lee's Summit, and after junior high he moved to Topeka to attend the Kansas Vocational Technical School. He moved to Topeka permanently after his World War II discharge. Baston was a member of the executive committee of the local chapter of the NAACP during the Brown v. Board hearings. Much of his interview deals with the NAACPs role in finding plaintiffs in the Brown case, the problem with busing students to segregated schools, and other individuals who were instrumental to the success of this suit. Towards the end of the interview he also talks about how the Brown decision has not reached its full potential because of the racial prejudices that still exist today. Jean VanDelinder conducted the interview. The Brown v. Board oral history project was funded by Hallmark Cards Inc., the Shawnee County Historical Society, the Brown Foundation for Educational Excellence, Equity, and Research, the National Park Service, and the Kansas Humanities Council. Parts of the interview may be difficult to hear due to the quality of the original recording.


Choir at Fellowship Temple in Manhattan, Kansas

Choir at Fellowship Temple in Manhattan, Kansas
Date: October 1992
This is a slide showing choir members at the Fellowship Temple in Manhattan, Kansas.


Chris Hansen interview

Chris Hansen interview
Creator: Hansen, Chris
Date: October 5, 1992
Chris Hansen was an attorney with the American Civil Liberties Union, starting in 1973. In 1984, after the Brown v. Board desegregation case was reopened, Hansen served on the legal team working on this case. The ACLU was representing 17 children and their parents who claimed that the Topeka USD501 district had not fully complied with the 1954 U.S. Supreme Court decision declaring segregated schools unconstitutional. The case went before the Federal District Court in October 1986, and four years later after an appeal, the court ruled in favor of the petitioners, stating that Topeka Public Schools had not fully complied with the court decision to desegregate. Hansen's interview discusses his involvement in the case, the plaintiffs (including Linda Brown Smith) and his experiences in Topeka. The interview was conducted by Jean VanDelinder. The Brown v. Board oral history project was funded by Hallmark Cards Inc., the Shawnee County Historical Society, the Brown Foundation for Educational Excellence, Equity, and Research, the National Park Service, and the Kansas Humanities Council.


Construction at Menninger Clinic, Topeka, Kansas

Construction at Menninger Clinic, Topeka, Kansas
Date: 1992
Mark Moulden and Bill Hart are photographed as they worked on the courtyard exit from the Tower Building, West Campus of the Menninger Clinic in Topeka, Kansas.


DS&O Rural Electric Cooperative's board of trustees

DS&O Rural Electric Cooperative's board of trustees
Date: May 1992
This is a photograph of DS&O Rural Electric Cooperative's board of trustees. DS&O Electric Cooperative was established during the Great Depression as part of the federal recovery effort to bring the advantages and economic stimulus of electric power to rural Kansas. In 1991, Smoky Valley Electric Cooperative in Lindsborg, Kansas, merged with DS&O, adding to the Cooperative's coverage area and member base. DS&O Rural Electrical Cooperative's office is located in Solomon, Kansas. It was named DS&O because members were from Dickinson, Saline, and Ottawa counties.


Glen Gabbard, M.D.

Glen Gabbard, M.D.
Date: May 1992
Glen Gabbard, M.D., is shown speaking at the 1992 Menninger School of Psychiatry graduation. He was recipient of the I. Arthur Marshall award. Dr. Gabbard was director of the Menninger Hospital in Topeka, Kansas, from 1989 to 1994. He authored and edited many books and articles on the theory and practice of psychiatry and psychoanalysis.


Glen Gabbard, M.D.

Glen Gabbard, M.D.
Date: November 1989
This photograph shows Glen Gabbard, M.D., speaking at the 1989 Author's Reception at the Menninger Clinic in Topeka, Kansas. Dr. Gabbard was director of the Menninger Hospital in Topeka, Kansas, from 1989 to 1994. He authored and edited many books and articles on the theory and practice of psychiatry and psychoanalysis.


Jean Price interview

Jean Price interview
Creator: Price, Jean
Date: February 12, 1992
Jean (Scott) Price was born in Wichita, Kansas, on June 16, 1929, and attended segregated schools from the first through eighth grades. She then attended the integrated North High School. For a short time she lived in Kansas City, Kansas and attended the segregated Sumner High School. She graduated from North High School in Wichita and later on from Wichita University (now Wichita State University) with a degree in teaching. She also received her master's in education from Emporia State. After moving to Topeka in 1956, Price accepted a job at the Parkdale School where she was the only teacher of African-American descent. After the Supreme Court declared segregated schools unconstitutional in 1954, Parkdale became integrated. She also taught at the Lowman Hill School. According to her interview, she generally got along well with her students' parents and school officials, even though some were opposed to desegregation. The interview was conducted by Jean VanDelinder.


John Michael (Mike) Hayden

John Michael (Mike) Hayden
Date: 1992
A photograph of Mike Hayden, Assistant Secretary of the Interior for Fish and Wildlife and former Kansas Governor, with his parents Ruth and Irven Hayden in front of a sign announcing the future site of the Marais des Cygnes National Wildlife Refuge, Linn County, Kansas. Hayden was born in Atwood Kansas, and received his bachelor's degree in wildlife conservation from Kansas State University and a master's degree in biology from Fort Hays State University. During the Vietnam War, he was an infantry company commander in the U.S. Army. Hayden spent thirteen months in Vietnam, where he received the Soldier's Medal, two bronze Stars, and the Army Commendation Medal. He began his career in public service as a state representative, serving from 1972 to 1986. In 1983 and 1985, he was elected speaker of the Kansas House of Representatives. Hayden was elected Kansas Governor in 1986. After leaving office in 1991, President George H. W. Bush named Hayden to be the Assistant Secretary of the Interior for Fish and Wildlife. From 1993 to 2001, Hayden served as President and CEO of the American Sportfishing Association. In 2002, he returned to Kansas to accept a position as Secretary of Wildlife and Parks.


John Michael (Mike) Hayden with President George Herbert Walker Bush

John Michael (Mike) Hayden with President George Herbert Walker Bush
Date: May 14, 1992
A photograph of Mike Hayden, Assistant Secretary of the Interior for Fish and Wildlife and former Kansas Governor, and James M. Ridenour, Director of National Park Service with United States President George Herbert Walker Bush. They were at Anacostia Park, Washington, D. C., for a Keep America Beautiful event. Hayden was born in Atwood Kansas, and received his bachelor's degree in wildlife conservation from Kansas State University and a master's degree in biology from Fort Hays State University. During the Vietnam War, he was an infantry company commander in the U.S. Army. Hayden spent 13 months in Vietnam, where he received the Soldier's Medal, two bronze Stars, and the Army Commendation Medal. He began his career in public service as a state representative, serving from 1972 to 1986. In 1983 and 1985, he was elected speaker of the Kansas House of Representatives. Hayden was elected Kansas Governor in 1986. After leaving office in 1991, President George Herbert Walker Bush named Hayden to be the Assistant Secretary of the Interior for Fish and Wildlife. From 1993 to 2001, Hayden served as President and CEO of the American Sportfishing Association. In 2002, he returned to Kansas to accept a position as Secretary of Wildlife and Parks.


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