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Administrative building at the State Orphans Home in Atchison, Kansas

Administrative building at the State Orphans Home in Atchison, Kansas
Creator: Lotus Engraving Company
Date: 1936
A photograph of the administration building at the State Orphans Home in Atchison, Kansas. In 1887 Kansas opened the Soldiers' Orphans' Home in Atchison for children of Union soldiers and sailors. This was the first such facility in the state for children who had lost their parents. At first limited to veterans' children aged five and under, regulations were altered in 1889 to admit all "dependent, neglected or abused children" between the ages of two and 14. The name was changed to the State Orphans' Home in 1909.


Advertising for Security Benefit Association in Topeka, Kansas

Advertising for Security Benefit Association in Topeka, Kansas
Date: 1920
This is an advertising card for joining the Security Benefit Association, an early social security system. There was a model hospital for the members who paid a nickel a month for hospital care. That fee also covered an orphanage for their children if the member died and an old folks home all centered around a model farm in Topeka, Kansas.


Advertising for Security Benefit Association in Topeka, Kansas

Advertising for Security Benefit Association in Topeka, Kansas
Date: 1920
This is an advertising card for joining the Security Benefit Association, an early social security system. There was a model hospital for the members who paid a nickel a month for hospital care. That fee also covered an orphanage for their children if the member died and an old folks home all centered around a model farm in Topeka, Kansas.


Aerial view of the Kansas State Children's Receiving Home in Atchison, Kansas

Aerial view of the Kansas State Children's Receiving Home in Atchison, Kansas
Date: 1960
An aerial view of the Kansas State Children's Receiving Home in Atchison, Kansas. In 1887, Kansas opened the Soldiers' Orphan's Home in Atchison for children of Union soldiers and sailors. This was the first such facility in the state for children who had lost their parents. At first limited to veterans' children aged five and under, regulations were altered in 1889 to admit all "dependent, neglected or abused children" between the ages of two and 14. The name was changed to the State Orphans' Home in 1909 and in 1953 to the Kansas Children's Home, and in 1955 to the Kansas Children's Receiving Home.


Aerial view of the Kansas State Children's Receiving Home in Atchison, Kansas

Aerial view of the Kansas State Children's Receiving Home in Atchison, Kansas
Date: 1962
An aerial view of the Kansas State Children's Receiving Home in Atchison, Kansas. In 1887, Kansas opened the Soldiers' Orphan's Home in Atchison for children of Union soldiers and sailors. This was the first such facility in the state for children who had lost their parents. At first limited to veterans' children aged five and under, regulations were altered in 1889 to admit all "dependent, neglected or abused children" between the ages of two and 14. The name was changed to the State Orphans' Home in 1909 and in 1953 to the Kansas Children's Home, and in 1955 to the Kansas Children's Receiving Home.


Children seated in the dining room at the State Orphans Home, Atchison, Kansas

Children seated in the dining room at the State Orphans Home, Atchison, Kansas
Creator: Lotus Engraving Company
Date: 1936
A photograph of children in the dining room of the State Orphans Home in Atchison, Kansas. In 1887 Kansas opened the Soldiers' Orphans' Home in Atchison for children of Union soldiers and sailors. This was the first such facility in the state for children who had lost their parents. At first limited to veterans' children aged five and under, regulations were altered in 1889 to admit all "dependent, neglected or abused children" between the ages of two and 14. The name was changed to the State Orphans' Home in 1909.


Display of works from the State Orphans Home in Atchison, Kansas

Display of works from the State Orphans Home in Atchison, Kansas
Creator: Lotus Engraving Company
Date: 1936
A photograph of a display showing the work of the Manual Training Department and the Girls Department at the State Orphans Home in Atchison, Kansas. In 1887 Kansas opened the Soldiers' Orphans' Home in Atchison for children of Union soldiers and sailors. This was the first such facility in the state for children who had lost their parents. At first limited to veterans' children aged five and under, regulations were altered in 1889 to admit all "dependent, neglected or abused children" between the ages of two and 14. The name was changed to the State Orphans' Home in 1909. This home protected orphan children, and gave them a chance to enjoy their childhoods.


Fellows' Club, Menninger West Campus, Topeka, Kansas

Fellows' Club, Menninger West Campus, Topeka, Kansas
Date: 1960-1962
The Fellows' Club was formerly Building "A" of the Security Benefit Association Complex. It was built in 1918-1919 and housed the orphaned children of members of the Association. It was called the Children's Building or the Orphan's Dormitory. At first it also housed old people until their quarters Buildings "B" and "C" were completed. In 1942, the last child had been moved out and the building was closed. In 1950, when S.B.A. became a mutual rather than a fraternal insurance organization, the building was renamed "Hilltop Lodge" and served as a hotel for visiting families of patients at the S.B.A. hospital. The Menninger Foundation purchased the property in 1959 and in 1962 the basement was remodelled as the Fellows' Club of the Menninger School of Psychiatry. Later the building was remodelled to serve as a Day Hospital for the Menninger Clinic West Campus and was named the Clevenger Building. In 2003, the Menninger Foundation moved to Houston, Texas.


Girls at the State Orphans Home in Atchison, Kansas

Girls at the State Orphans Home in Atchison, Kansas
Creator: Kansas. State Orphans Home
Date: 1926
A photograph of a group of girls from the State Orphans Home in Atchison, Kansas. This photograph was copied from the 20th Biennial Report for the State Orphans Home, 1926. In 1887, Kansas opened the Soldiers' Orphan's Home in Atchison for children of Union soldiers and sailors. This was the first such facility in the state for children who had lost their parents. At first limited to veterans' children aged five and under, regulations were altered in 1889 to admit all "dependent, neglected or abused children" between the ages of two and 14. The name was changed to the State Orphans Home in 1909.


Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence, orphans

Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence, orphans
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1929-1931 : Reed)
Date: 1929-1931
This file includes subject correspondence relating to orphanages. Topics in the correspondence cover but is not limited to orphan placement, scarlet fever epidemic at the State Orphans' Home and the establishement of an orphanage for Native American children. This file is part of a bigger collection of Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence.


Hospitals at the State Orphans Home in Atchison, Kansas

Hospitals at the State Orphans Home in Atchison, Kansas
Creator: Lotus Engraving Company
Date: 1936
A photograph of the hospitals at the State Orphans Home in Atchison, Kansas. In 1887 Kansas opened the Soldiers' Orphans' Home in Atchison for children of Union soldiers and sailors. This was the first such facility in the state for children who had lost their parents. At first limited to veterans' children aged five and under, regulations were altered in 1889 to admit all "dependent, neglected or abused children" between the ages of two and 14. The name was changed to the State Orphans' Home in 1909.


Planting plan for Orphan's Home of the Security Benefit Ass'n, Topeka, Kansas

Planting plan for Orphan's Home of the Security Benefit Ass'n, Topeka, Kansas
Creator: Hare & Hare Landscape Archs & City Planners, Kansas City, MO
Date: January 1922
This is a planting plan for the landscape surrounding the Orphan's Home of the Security Benefit Association in Topeka, Kansas.


Room interiors in the Security Benefit Association orphanage in Topeka, Kansas

Room interiors in the Security Benefit Association orphanage in Topeka, Kansas
Date: 1920
These three photographs show two bedrooms and a living room in 'Building A' of the Security Benefit orphanage. This building was remodeled in the 1980's to function as the day treatment center of the Menninger Clinic.


School building and cottages at the State Orphans Home in Atchison, Kansas

School building and cottages at the State Orphans Home in Atchison, Kansas
Creator: Lotus Engraving Company
Date: 1936
A photograph of the school building and cottages at the State Orphans Home in Atchison, Kansas. In 1887 Kansas opened the Soldiers' Orphans' Home in Atchison for children of Union soldiers and sailors. This was the first such facility in the state for children who had lost their parents. At first limited to veterans' children aged five and under, regulations were altered in 1889 to admit all "dependent, neglected or abused children" between the ages of two and 14. The name was changed to the State Orphans' Home in 1909. This home protected orphan children, and gave them a chance to enjoy their childhoods.


Security Benefit Association, Hilltop Manor, Topeka, Kansas

Security Benefit Association, Hilltop Manor, Topeka, Kansas
Date: Between 1930 and 1939
This brochure is advertising the amenities of the Hilltop Manor in Topeka, Kansas. The facility was located west of Sixth Avenue in Topeka, Kansas, and was owned and operated by the fraternal organization of the Security Benefit Association. The 400-acre grounds consisted of a hospital, retirement home, children's home, a greenhouse and a hotel for visiting friends and relatives. In the 1950s the cooperative farm was abandoned when the company ceased to be a fraternal organization and became primarily a life insurance company know as Security Benefit Life. The land was later sold to the Menninger Foundation.


Security Benefit Association grounds, Topeka, Kansas

Security Benefit Association grounds, Topeka, Kansas
Date: Between 1940s and 1950s
This aerial view shows the Security Benefit Association grounds in Topeka, Kansas. The facility was located west of Sixth Avenue in Topeka, Kansas, and was owned and operated by the fraternal organization. The 400-acre grounds consisted of a hospital, retirement home, children's home, school house and cemetery. In the 1950s, the cooperative farm was abandoned when the company ceased to be a fraternal organization and became primarily a life insurance company known as Security Benefit Life. The land was eventually sold to the Menninger Foundation. Today, only a few structures are remaining.


Security Benfit Association's home & hospital grounds, Topeka, Kansas

Security Benfit Association's home & hospital grounds, Topeka, Kansas
Creator: Hare & Hare Landscape Archs & City Planners, Kansas City, MO
Date: 1921
This plat shows the general plans for the Security Benefit Association's home and hospital grounds in Topeka, Kansas. The facility was located west of Sixth Avenue in Topeka, Kansas and was owned and operated by the fraternal organization. The 400-acre grounds consisted of a hospital, retirement home, children's home, school and greenhouse. In the 1950s the cooperative farm was abandoned when the company ceased to be a fraternal organization and became primarily a life insurance company know as Security Benefit Life. The land was eventually sold to the Menninger Foundation. Today, only a few structures are remaining.


Soldier's Orphan's Home, Atchison, Kansas

Soldier's Orphan's Home, Atchison, Kansas
Date: 1904
A photograph of the Soldier's Orphan's Home in Atchison, Kansas. A 1904 calendar is also included. In 1887, Kansas opened this facility for children of Union soldiers and sailors. This was the first such facility in the state for children who had lost their parents. At first limited to veterans' children aged five and under, regulations were altered in 1889 to admit all "dependent, neglected or abused children" between the ages of two and 14. The name was changed to the State Orphans' Home in 1909.


Soldier's Orphan's Home, Atchison, Kansas

Soldier's Orphan's Home, Atchison, Kansas
Date: Between 1887 and 1908
Two views of the Soldier's Orphan's Home in Atchison, Kansas. In 1887, Kansas opened this facility for children of Union soldiers and sailors. This was the first such facility in the state for children who had lost their parents. At first limited to veterans' children aged five and under, regulations were altered in 1889 to admit all "dependent, neglected or abused children" between the ages of two and 14. The name was changed to the State Orphans' Home in 1909. This home protected orphan children, and gave them a chance to enjoy their childhoods.


Soldiers' Orphans Home in Atchison, Kansas

Soldiers' Orphans Home in Atchison, Kansas
Creator: Curt Teich & Co.
Date: 1906
A postcard showing the Soldiers' Orphans Home in Atchison, Kansas. Founded in 1885, it was originally established for the nurture, education, and maintenance of indigent children of soldiers and sailors who served in the Union during the Civil War. The age limit was 14 years. In 1935, the admission requirements were changed to include children who were dependent upon the public for support or who were abandoned, neglected or ill-treated, and wards of the state. The name of the institution changed in 1909 to the State Orphans' Home, in 1953 to the Kansas Children's Home, and in 1955 to the Kansas Children's Receiving Home.


Soldiers' Orphans Home in Atchison, Kansas

Soldiers' Orphans Home in Atchison, Kansas
Creator: Hugh C. Leighton Co.
Date: 1908
A postcard showing the Soldiers' Orphans Home in Atchison, Kansas. Founded in 1885, it was originally established for the nurture, education, and maintenance of indigent children of soldiers and sailors who served in the Union during the Civil War. The age limit was 14 years. In 1935, the admission requirements were changed to include children who were dependent upon the public for support or who were abandoned, neglected or ill-treated, and wards of the state. The name of the institution changed in 1909 to the State Orphans' Home, in 1953 to the Kansas Children's Home, and in 1955 to the Kansas Children's Receiving Home.


Some buildings of the Security Benefit Association, Topeka, Kansas

Some buildings of the Security Benefit Association, Topeka, Kansas
Date: 1930
This black and white photograph shows most of the buildings of the Security Benefit Association complex. The S.B.A. was, initially, a fraternal organization that helped fund health care. Members paid a nickel a month for free care at a association hospital. That fee also covered an orphanage for their children, if the member died, and an old folks home. It was all located as what the association claimed was a model facility in Topeka, Kansas. See Kansas Memory items 224538 and 224543 for advertising publications. Many of the buildings were remodeled when The Menninger Foundation purchased the property and built new structures for the Menninger Clinic. Some buildings are still in existence today, in 2011.


State Orphans' Home at atchison - Appropriation Reduction Questioned

State Orphans' Home at atchison - Appropriation Reduction Questioned
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1915-1919: Capper)
Date: February 1915
Written by The Atchison Commercial Club on behalf of the State Orphans Home, the Club is asking Governor Capper and B.P. Waggener to improve the condition of the State Orphans Home in Atchison, Kansas. Included with the letter is a report of the conditions of the Home conducted by a committee appointed to the investigation. This file is part of a bigger collection of Governor Arthur Capper correspondence.


State Orphans Home at the Capitol building, Topeka, Kansas

State Orphans Home at the Capitol building, Topeka, Kansas
Date: 1915
Two photographs of children from the State Orphans Home visiting the Capitol building in Topeka, Kansas. In 1887, Kansas opened this facility for children of Union soldiers and sailors. This was the first such facility in the state for children who had lost their parents. At first limited to veterans' children aged five and under, regulations were altered in 1889 to admit all "dependent, neglected or abused children" between the ages of two and 14. The name was changed to the State Orphans Home in 1909.


State Orphans Home in Atchison - Complaints

State Orphans Home in Atchison - Complaints
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1915-1919: Capper)
Date: 1915
This file includes correspondence relating to complaints from the State Orphans Home in Atchison, Kansas. Correspondence in the file discusses the transfer of girls to different facilities within the orphanage, farm, and cottage. This is part of a bigger collection of Governor Arthur Capper correspondence.


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