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Date - 1861-1869 - 1865

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A Kansas Pacific Railway map of Kansas and Colorado

A Kansas Pacific Railway map of Kansas and Colorado
Creator: Kansas Pacific Railway Company
Date: Between 1865 and 1880
This map by the Kansas Pacific Railway Company features their "Golden Belt Route" from Kansas City to the "rich silver discoveries in Colorado." It advertises the "shortest and quickest, therefore the cheapest, route to Colorado." The map includes all of the counties of Kansas and eastern Colorado and most of the cities, towns and communities.


Affidavit of John Smith

Affidavit of John Smith
Creator: United States. Congress. Senate
Date: January 15, 1865
This affidavit given by John Smith, an interpreter for the United States military, was presented to the military commission investigating the massacre of Cheyenne Indians at Sand Creek, Colorado, in 1864. Smith's account focuses primary on the events prior to the massacre, including the attitudes of the Cheyenne leaders One Eye and Black Kettle. The affidavit is part of a larger report containing evidence obtained at this hearing, titled Report of the Secretary of War, Communicating, In compliance with a resolution of the Senate of February 4, 1867, a copy of the evidence taken at Denver and Fort Lyon, Colorado Territory, by a military commission, ordered to inquire into the Sand Creek massacre, November, 1864.


African American cowboys

African American cowboys
Date: Around 1865
This studio portrait from a tintype shows an African American cowboy (left). The ethnicity of the second man (right) is less clear. The location is unknown.


Andrew Amthauer

Andrew Amthauer
Date: 1865
A portrait of Andrew Amthauer, a Geary County pioneer, copied from a photograph panel.


Battle of Platte River bridge in Wyoming

Battle of Platte River bridge in Wyoming
Creator: Playford, Jesse
Date: 1865
Here are two illustrations of the Platte Bridge Station drawn by Jesse Playford, a member of the 11th Kansas Cavalry, Company I. The station was established in 1858 as one of a series of fortified stations on the Oregon-California Trail. It was located on the south side of the North Platte River. Regular troops abandoned the station in 1859, the same year a 1,000-foot toll bridge was completed across the river. In 1862, during the Civil War, to counter increased Indian hostilities along the Oregon-California Trail and to guard the telegraph lines, volunteer regiments reoccupied Platte Bridge Station. The Indian threat reached a peak in the summer of 1865, when Lakota and Cheyenne descended on the trail from the Powder River country. At the time of the battle, the Platte Bridge Station was commanded by Major Martin Anderson of the 11th Kansas Cavalry. The garrison consisted of about 120 men of the Kansas Cavalry, detachments of Ohio Cavalry, and some volunteers. Following the battle, troops enlarged and rebuilt the fort in 1866, but the following year evacuated it and moved to Fort Fetterman, Wyoming. Almost immediately the Indians burned the buildings and the bridge.


Charles Chadwick to Hiram Hill

Charles Chadwick to Hiram Hill
Creator: Chadwick, Charles
Date: February 4, 1865
Charles Chadwick of Lawrence, Kansas, writes to Hiram Hill of Massachusettes detailing many of the events surrounding Confederate General Sterling Price's invasion and the steps Kansans took in preparation for an expected attack. In particular, Chadwick discusses the back and forth battles along the Missouri/Kansas border between Price and Union commander, General Alfred Pleasonton, that took place in the Fall of 1864.


Civil War Valentine

Civil War Valentine
Creator: W. Momberger
Date: between 1861 and 1865
Joseph Forrest sent Valentines to Elizabeth Ehrhart during the Civil War. They were residents of Macon County, Illinois, and became engaged in 1858. Joseph enlisted on July 25, 1861 at Decatur, Illinois and fought as a private with Co. A of 8th Illinois Volunteer Infantry. The couple married Aug. 9, 1863. The Forrests moved to Jewell County, Kansas in 1872, where Joseph served as a Methodist Minister. In 1875, they moved to Minneapolis, Kansas.


Civil War Valentine

Civil War Valentine
Date: between 1861 and 1865
Joseph Forrest sent Valentines to Elizabeth Ehrhart during the Civil War. They were residents of Macon County, Illinois, and became engaged in 1858. Joseph enlisted on July 25, 1861 at Decatur, Illinois and fought as a private with Co. A of 8th Illinois Volunteer Infantry. The couple married Aug. 9, 1863. The Forrests moved to Jewell County, Kansas in 1872, where Joseph served as a Methodist Minister. In 1875, they moved to Minneapolis, Kansas.


Civil War Valentine

Civil War Valentine
Date: between 1861 and 1865
Joseph Forrest sent Valentines to Elizabeth Ehrhart during the Civil War. They were residents of Macon County, Illinois, and became engaged in 1858. Joseph enlisted on July 25, 1861 at Decatur, Illinois and fought as a private with Co. A of 8th Illinois Volunteer Infantry. The couple married Aug. 9, 1863. The Forrests moved to Jewell County, Kansas in 1872, where Joseph served as a Methodist Minister. In 1875, they moved to Minneapolis, Kansas.


Colonel Samuel N. Wood and his son David Wood

Colonel Samuel N. Wood and his son David Wood
Date: Between 1865 and 1867
This photograph of Colonel Samuel N. Wood and his son David Wood was taken shortly after the Civil War. It has been so heavily manipulated that it looks more like a hand drawing than a photograph.


Descriptive roll, Second Regiment, Cavalry, Kansas Civil War Volunteers, volume 2

Descriptive roll, Second Regiment, Cavalry, Kansas Civil War Volunteers, volume 2
Creator: Kansas. Adjutant General's Office
Date: April 1862-April 1865
This is the descriptive roll for Civil War soldiers in the Second Regiment, Kansas Volunteer Cavalry. Information includes description, marital status, nativity, residence, muster information, and remarks. The index to the Kansas Adjutant General's Report, 1861-1865, (see link below) also gives the regiment and company the soldier served in.


Diary of John Beck, 1865

Diary of John Beck, 1865
Creator: Beck, John
Date: January 1, 1865 - December 31, 1865
This diary by John Beck describes his life in 1865. He writes about his imprisonment and conditions at Danville Confederate Prison in Danville, Virginia. Beck was paroled February 21, 1865, at Aikens Landing, Virginia. While in a hospital at Annapolis, Maryland, he hears of Lincoln's assassination and talks about the assassination of Lincoln and the assassination attempt on William H. Seward. He makes a trip to Washington to attend Lincoln's funeral. After being discharged from the Army, John traveled to Kansas and bought a farm near Ft. Scott, Kansas. The diary was transcribed by Clark John Beck, Jr. and it includes a photograph of John Beck wearing his uniform.


Edmund G. Ross correspondence

Edmund G. Ross correspondence
Date: 1856-1865
Correspondence to and from Edmund G. Ross. A number of letters are from Ross to his wife Fannie Lathrop Ross. There is one letter from S. C. Pomeroy about Ross's request to raise a company of men. There are also a number of telegrams relating to military activities. During the Civil War Ross served in Company E of the 11th Kansas Cavalry. In 1866 he was appointed by the governor to fill the unexpired United States Senate term of James Lane, who had committed suicide. Ross served in the Senate until 1871. Transcriptions of some of the letters are included with the images of the originals.


Edward Russell

Edward Russell
Date: Around 1865
This is a portrait of Edward Russell, a newspaperman and politician. He came to Kansas Territory in 1856, and located in Elwood, in Doniphan County, Kansas. Shortly after moving to Kansas, Russell started a newspaper that espoused the free-state side. In August, 1858, he lobbied Doniphan county citizens against the Lecompton Constitution. In that same year, Russell, D. W. Wilder and others founded a free-state paper. Russell later served in the Kansas legislature, and held several state offices.


First Regiment, Infantry, muster in rolls, Kansas Civil War volunteer regiments, volume 3 (AR114)

First Regiment, Infantry, muster in rolls, Kansas Civil War volunteer regiments, volume 3 (AR114)
Creator: Kansas. Adjutant General's Office
Date: Between 1860 and 1865
This is the muster in rolls for Civil War soldiers in the First Regiment, Kansas Volunteer Infantry. Information includes description, marital status, nativity, residence, muster information, and remarks. The index to the Kansas Adjutant General's Report, 1861-1865, (see link below) also gives the regiment and company the soldier served in.


Fort Dodge, Kansas

Fort Dodge, Kansas
Date: Between 1865 and 1867
Fort Dodge established in 1865 by Captain Henry Pierce from the 11th Kansas Cavalry. Located on the left bank of the Arkansas River on the "Long Route" of the Santa Fe Trail a few miles southeast of the present Dodge City. The fort was designed to protect the U.S. mail and emigrant wagon trains on the Santa Fe Trail.


Gallows crossbeam fragment

Gallows crossbeam fragment
Date: between 1860 and 1865
Fragment of the crossbeam from gallows scaffold. Long rectangular pine block. The beam was part of the scaffold used to execute the conspirators of Abraham Lincoln's assassination. The following individuals were hanged from this scaffold on 7 July 1865: David E. Herold, George A. Atzerodt, Lewis Payne, and Mary Surratt. After the execution, the scaffold was disassembled and housed in the Washington (D.C.) Barracks. While pieces of lumber from the gallows were reused in other projects, the crossbeam was hidden to discourage souvenir hunters. In 1885, the secretary of the Kansas Historical Society wrote to the Quartermaster's Office at the Washington Barracks and requested a piece of the gallows for the Society's collections. Lieutenant Sebree Smith sent this fragment, along with a letter of authentication from a man who worked there when the pieces of the gallows were brought to the barracks.


General James G. Blunt's flag

General James G. Blunt's flag
Date: between 1861 and 1864
This flag was presented to General Blunt by a group of ladies from Leavenworth. This group purchased the banner from a New York firm.


George Armstrong and Elizabeth Custer

George Armstrong and Elizabeth Custer
Date: 1865
A photograph of George Armstrong and Elizabeth Bacon Custer taken in Huntington, Texas. In June 1865, General Philip Sheridan put Custer in command of the 2d Division of Cavalry, Military Division of the Southwest. Accompanied by his wife, he led the division to Texas. In October he moved his men to Austin, when he became Chief of Cavalry for the Department of Texas. Custer's division was mustered out beginning in November 1865, replaced by the regulars of the U.S. 6th Cavalry Regiment.


George Morton Walker

George Morton Walker
Date: Between 1862 and 1865
This is a photograph of Second Lieutenant George Morton Walker who served in Company C, 11th Regiment Kansas Volunteer Cavalry. He was from Emporia, Kansas and enlisted as a private on August 19, 1862, promoted to sergeant on September 13, 1862, promoted to Second Lieutenant on September 20, 1863, and mustered out on September 22, 1865. His account titled "Eleventh Kansas Cavalry, 1865, and Battle of Platte Bridge" is published in the 1918 Kansas Historical Collections.


George W. Martin certificate of appointment

George W. Martin certificate of appointment
Creator: United States. President (1861-1865 : Lincoln)
Date: March 08, 1865
This certificate appointing George W. Martin, Register of the Land Office at Junction City, Kansas. The certificate is signed by Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, and John Palmer Usher, Secretary of the Interior.


Henry A. Strong correspondence

Henry A. Strong correspondence
Creator: Strong, Henry A.
Date: December 24, 1860-August 10, 1865
Henry Strong wrote these letters to Otis B. Strong of Huntsburg, Ohio. Strong was in Company K, 12th Regiment, Kansas Volunteers from Paola, Kansas, during the Civil War. The letters were written from various places: Moneka, Kansas; Little Rock, Arkansas; Camp Blunt, Paola, Kansas; Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, Kansas City, Missouri; Osawatomie, Kansas; Fort Smith, Arkansas; Chattanooga, Tennessee; Mansfield, Kansas; Fort Gibson, Cherokee Nation. The letters address Strong's activities as a Kansas volunteer during the Civil War.


Henry Hudson Williams

Henry Hudson Williams
Creator: Wertz, G., proprietor of Kansas City Photograph Rooms
Date: Between 1861 and 1865
Ths is a carte-de-visite of Major Henry Hudson Williams. He was born in Hudson, New York, September 28, 1828. Williams came to Kansas in the spring of 1855, and was the third settler on Pottawatomie Creek in Anderson County. He became closely associated with John Brown and other free-state men. Williams was sent as a delegate to the Big Springs convention in September, 1855, and marched to the defense of Lawrence in December, 1855. During this time, he was made second lieutenant of the Pottawatomie Rifles. Williams was a member of the Kansas House of Representatives elected under the Topeka Constitution. He was one of the free-state prisoners at Lecompton with Charles Robinson, Gaius Jenkins and others. Williams was sheriff of Miami County in 1857 and reelected in 1859 and served until 1861 when he enlisted in the Third Kansas Regiment. He later served in the 10th Kansas Volunteer Infantry headquarters. At the close of the Civil War, Major Williams went to Kansas City where he was appointed sheriff of Jackson County, but in April 1867, he returned to Kansas settling in Osawatomie, Kansas. Williams was elected to the Kansas House of Representatives in 1868 and the Senate in 1869 and 1870 and appointed one of the railroad assessors on March 24, 1871. He served on the statehouse commission from 1879 to 1883 and 1886-1887. Williams married Mary A. Carr in Osawatomie, February 23, 1858. He died in San Diego, California on March 28, 1906.


Henry Hudson Williams Civil War collection

Henry Hudson Williams Civil War collection
Date: 1861 - 1865
This is a collection of Civil War papers issued to Henry Hudson Williams. Included in the collection are discharge papers from the 10th Kansas Volunteer Infantry, Field & Staff (February 23, 1865); State of Missouri commission papers appointing Williams Colonel of the Jackson and Cass Counties Regiment (March 25, 1865); a certificate electing Williams Major of the 3rd Regiment of the U.S. Volunteers from the State of Kansas (July 24, 1861); and the muster-out roll for Major Henry H. Williams, 10th Regiment Kansas Volunteer Infantry (February 23, 1865).


Hugh A. Cook with his wife and children

Hugh A. Cook with his wife and children
Creator: Lamon, W. H.
Date: 1865
Portrait of Mr. & Mrs. Hugh A. Cook and their three eldest children. He was the second Sheriff of Franklin County, Kansas. Photo taken by W. H. Lamon, Lawrence, Kansas.


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