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Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln
Date: 1861
An engraving of Abraham Lincoln, the sixteenth President of the United States. He successfully led the country through its greatest internal crisis, the Civil War, saving the Union and ending slavery, only to be assassinated as the war was virtually over. Before becoming the first Republican elected to the Presidency, Lincoln was a lawyer, an Illinois state legislator, and a member of the United States House of Representatives.


Abraham Lincoln raising the thirty-four star flag

Abraham Lincoln raising the thirty-four star flag
Creator: Richards, F. De B. (Frederick De Bourg)
Date: February 22, 1861
This is an illustration showing President Abraham Lincoln hoisting the American flag with thirty-four stars upon Independence Hall, Philadelphia, February 22, 1861. Copied from Harper's Weekly, March 9, 1861.


Account of provisions and supplies issued to destitute Shawnees

Account of provisions and supplies issued to destitute Shawnees
Creator: Abbott, James Burnett
Date: 1861
This account book belonging to an Indian agent named James Burnett Abbott lists the names of Shawnee Indian heads of household, the number of family members within their household, and the amount of pork, corn, and meal provided by the government to each Shawnee. The Shawnee had emigrated to Kansas after the Indian Removal Act of 1830. Only an excerpt is included here.


A family dying of starvation in Black Jack, Kansas Territory

A family dying of starvation in Black Jack, Kansas Territory
Creator: New York Illustrated News
Date: January 19, 1861
An illustration copied from the New York Illustrated News showing a family dying of starvation in Black Jack, Kansas Territory. Kansas experienced a long period of drought from June 1859 through November 1860 and as a result settlers suffered particularly in the rural areas. With failed crops and limited supplies, thousands of destitute people packed up and went back East.


A joint resolution to amend the constitution of the United States

A joint resolution to amend the constitution of the United States
Creator: United States. President (1861-1865 : Lincoln)
Date: March 16, 1861
This document is a copy of a joint resolution to amend the constitution of the United States, sent to the governor of Kansas. Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America that Article XIII be "proposed to the legislatures of the several States as an amendment to the Constitution of the United States which when ratified by three-fourths of said legislatures shall be valid to all intents and purposes as part of the said Constitution." Article XIII - "No amendment shall be made to the Constitution which will authorize or give to Congress the power to abolish or interfere within any state with the domestic institutions thereof, including that of persons held to labor or service by the laws of said State."


Alexander C. Spilman to Samuel N. Wood

Alexander C. Spilman to Samuel N. Wood
Creator: Spillman, A. C.
Date: January 14, 1861
From Salina, Alexander Carraway Spilman wrote "as one of your [Wood's] constituents" regarding his opposition to a Junction City proposal that to change the boundary line between Dickinson and Davis counties to increase the size of the former at the expense of the latter. Spilman believed "A change in the lines of Dickinson would necessarily involve a change in the lines of Saline which is something that must not be done under any circumstances."


Allen T. Ward correspondence

Allen T. Ward correspondence
Creator: Ward, Allen T., 1806-1862
Date: 1861
These two letters from the Allen T. Ward collection focus on Kansas at the onset of the Civil War. The letter from Allen to his sister concerns the numerous raids of the Jayhawkers and the Secessionists, and Lane leading a number of blacks to the area. The second letter from W.W. Phillips to John B. Ward focuses on the excitement that war has brought to the area, trouble with the Indians, and Kansans readying themselves for future skirmishes with Missouri.


An act defining and providing for the punishment of certain crimes therein named

An act defining and providing for the punishment of certain crimes therein named
Creator: Kansas Legislature.
Date: 1861
Chapter 27, Section 1 of the General Laws of the State of Kansas (1861) provides for punishment by death for any person convicted of treason against the state. The legislature enacted the law at its first session ending March 26, 1861. The following year, the Legislature enacted a death penalty for persons convicted of first degree murder. These laws demonstrate the state's initial stance on capital punishment.


Andrew Jackson Huntoon correspondence

Andrew Jackson Huntoon correspondence
Creator: Huntoon, Andrew Jackson, d. 1902
Date: 1860-1863
Andrew Jackson Huntoon was a physician who came to Kansas in 1857, settling south of Topeka in Williamsport, Shawnee County. In 1861 he enlisted with the 5th Kansas Cavalry volunteer regiment, serving as assistant surgeon and surgeon of that group, seeing service along the Missouri border and in Arkansas. After mustering out he settled in Topeka, where he died in 1902. This collection consists primarily of letters to or from Lizzie, Huntoon's friend and later wife. Some of the content describes Indian affairs and military matters. A complete transcription is available by clicking "Text Version" below.


Antoine Barada's Parfleche

Antoine Barada's Parfleche
Date: 1861
Parfleches, like this one, were generally made of a dried buffalo hide that had been stretched and shaped to form a bag or container. This parfleche, donated to the Kansas Historical Society, was made for Antoine or Antonine Barada, 1807-1885, son of an Omaha mother and a French-American fur trapper and interpreter. Barada was something of a local folk hero in Nebraska, credited with feats of strength. The parfleche is decorated with a painted red, black and yellow geometric pattern on the front and back. The inner closure flap has "A. Barada 1861" in pencil. The seams are sewn with sinew.


April 18, 1861 issue of The Kansas State Journal, Lawrence, Kansas

April 18, 1861 issue of The Kansas State Journal, Lawrence, Kansas
Creator: The Kansas State Journal
Date: April 18, 1861
An article on page 2 of this issue of The Kansas State Journal, Lawrence, Kansas, announces the start of the Civil War with the headline "The War Commenced!" Other articles in this issue report on the bombardment of Fort Sumter and the presidential proclamation calling for 75,000 volunteers.


Charles Chadwick

Charles Chadwick
Creator: Mettner's Studio, Lawrence, Kansas
Date: 1861
This is a cabinet card photograph of Charles Chadwick, who was Kansas Attorney General from July 30, 1861 to December, 1861. Chadwick was born in Tompkins County, New York on March 8, 1820. He was an attorney in New York before moving to Quindaro, Kansas Territory, in 1857. When Attorney General Benjamin Franklin Simpson resigned to enlist in the Army in July of 1861, Governor Robinson appointed Chadwick as the second Attorney General for the State of Kansas. He started a law practice in Lawrence, Kansas, in 1863. He served as Paymaster General, with the rank of Major, during the administration of Governor Thomas Carney. In 1865, he was elected Justice of the Peace for the city of Lawrence, and was elected Police Judge in 1881. He died in Lawrence in 1900.


Charles Rainsford Jennison

Charles Rainsford Jennison
Date: Probably 1861
A portrait of Charles Rainsford Jennison, shown holding a rifle, with a dog at his feet, and dressed in outdoor garb with a fur hat and gloves, and a fringed coat trimmed with fur. Jennison was born in New York state in 1834, and settled in Osawatomie, Kansas Territory, in 1857. He was active in the free state cause, was active in a free state militia company, and was an associate of free state militiaman James Montgomery. Jennison was credited with several raids into Bates County, Missouri, and was part of a group who captured and hung a proslavey supporter named Russell Hinds. During the Civil War, he served as a Colonel in the 7th Kansas Cavalry.


Charles Robinson, first Kansas Governor

Charles Robinson, first Kansas Governor
Creator: Tucker, E. S.
Date: 1861
This is a cabinet card showing first Kansas Governor and Republican, Charles Robinson of Lawrence, Kansas. He served from February 9, 1861 to January 12, 1863.


Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson

Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: January 19, 1861
Charles Robinson, writing to his wife, Sara Robinson, in Lawrence, Kansas Territory, on January 19, 1861, is confident that things still looked good from him in Washington, D.C. Robinson mentions numerous men of political influence who he believes will be supportive and thus insure his appointment as Commissioner of Indian Affairs.


Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson

Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: January 11, 1861
From Lawrence, Kansas Territory, Robinson writes his wife Sara, who was still in the East, concerning Jim Lane's efforts to destroy Robinson's influence. The governor is not too worried, however, and writes that he could "by paying a little attention to the matter make him smell worse than ever. He and his friends are already beginning to falter in their course for fear that I will turn the tables on them which I can do with ease."


Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson

Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: September 22, 1861
A letter written by Charles Robinson, from St. Louis, Missouri, to his wife, Sara Tappan Doolittle Robinson. He writes about General Fremont taking to the field against Jackson, Price, and company. Because General Fremont is in the field, Robinson reports that he cannot leave and travel home. Also, he writes about looking for clothing for the Kansas regiments to protect them from the cold weather. A searchable, full-text version of this letter is available by clicking "Text Version" below.


Charles and Sarah Robinson correspondence

Charles and Sarah Robinson correspondence
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: 1861-1862
Correspondence between Charles Robinson, the first Governor of Kansas, his wife Sara, and others, mostly involving activities in the fight for a non-slavery Kansas. Some of the people discussed are Abraham Lincoln, James H. Lane, and Charles Jennison.


Circular by various Protestant ministers on behalf of the activities of the New England Emigrant Aid Company

Circular by various Protestant ministers on behalf of the activities of the New England Emigrant Aid Company
Creator: Stowe, C. E. (Calvin Ellis), 1802-1886
This printed circular indicated that nineteen Protestant ministers in the Boston area were urging emigration to Kansas under the auspices of the New England Emigrant Aid Company because the ministers listed believed "that no christian work demanded effort more than the work for peopling Kanzas with men and women who were resolved to make it free." The ministers proposed to raise $60,000 to aid emigration efforts. The document listed four areas of interest to the emigrant aid company--freedom, religion, education, and temperance. All nineteen ministers were listed in the document that was signed by Calvin E. Stowe, Andover; Edward E. Hale, Worcester; and Thomas J. Gaffield, Boston.


Civil War Valentine

Civil War Valentine
Date: between 1861 and 1865
Joseph Forrest sent Valentines to Elizabeth Ehrhart during the Civil War. They were residents of Macon County, Illinois, and became engaged in 1858. Joseph enlisted on July 25, 1861 at Decatur, Illinois and fought as a private with Co. A of 8th Illinois Volunteer Infantry. The couple married Aug. 9, 1863. The Forrests moved to Jewell County, Kansas in 1872, where Joseph served as a Methodist Minister. In 1875, they moved to Minneapolis, Kansas.


Civil War Valentine

Civil War Valentine
Creator: W. Momberger
Date: between 1861 and 1865
Joseph Forrest sent Valentines to Elizabeth Ehrhart during the Civil War. They were residents of Macon County, Illinois, and became engaged in 1858. Joseph enlisted on July 25, 1861 at Decatur, Illinois and fought as a private with Co. A of 8th Illinois Volunteer Infantry. The couple married Aug. 9, 1863. The Forrests moved to Jewell County, Kansas in 1872, where Joseph served as a Methodist Minister. In 1875, they moved to Minneapolis, Kansas.


Civil War Valentine

Civil War Valentine
Date: between 1861 and 1865
Joseph Forrest sent Valentines to Elizabeth Ehrhart during the Civil War. They were residents of Macon County, Illinois, and became engaged in 1858. Joseph enlisted on July 25, 1861 at Decatur, Illinois and fought as a private with Co. A of 8th Illinois Volunteer Infantry. The couple married Aug. 9, 1863. The Forrests moved to Jewell County, Kansas in 1872, where Joseph served as a Methodist Minister. In 1875, they moved to Minneapolis, Kansas.


Clara Livona McCreery Howe

Clara Livona McCreery Howe
Date: 1861
A portrait of Clara Livona McCreery Howe taken at age 11. She was born on September 19, 1850 in Brookfield, Wisconsin. In 1856, she and her family moved from Wisconsin to West Union, Iowa. Clara married Fletcher Bowman Howe on December 31, 1868. They had two sons, George Christina and Mark Watson. In 1873, the Howes' moved to a homestead near Esbon, Jewell County, Kansas, where they spent most of their lives farming.


Clarina Irene Howard Nichols

Clarina Irene Howard Nichols
Date: Between 1845 and 1861
This photograph is a studio portrait of Clarina Irene Howard Nichols. In 1854 Nichols joined the New England Emigrant Aid Society and moved her family to a claim in southern Douglas County, near Lawrence, Kansas Territory. Her husband died the next year and in 1856 Nichols moved the family to Wyandotte County where she became associate editor of the Quindaro Chindowan, an abolitionist newspaper. Nichols attended the Wyandotte Constitutional Convention in 1859 where she secured liberal property rights for Kansas women, equal guardianship of their children, and the right to vote on all school questions. Susan B. Anthony paid tribute to Clarina Nichols in her book, "History of Woman Suffrage."


Colonel James Montgomery appointment

Colonel James Montgomery appointment
Date: June 24, 1861
This document officially appoints and commissions James Montgomery as a Colonel of the Third Regiment of Volunteers, State of Kansas--part of General Lane's Brigade. Montgomery was an obvious choice for such a post due to his experience as a Jayhawker during the Bleeding Kansas period that followed the passage of the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854, as well as his ardent support of the Union at the eve of the Civil War.


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