Kansas MemoryKansas Memory

Kansas Historical SocietyKansas Historical Society

Narrow your results

1800-1820 (1)
1850s (1)
1861-1869 (1)
1870s (1)
1880s (1)
1890s (3)
1900s (24)
1910s (35)
1920s (8)
1930s (9)
1940s (5)
1950s (1)
1960s (1)

-

Log In

Username:

Password:

After login, go to:

Register
Forgot Username?
Forgot Password?

Browse Users
Contact us

-

Martha Farnsworth

-

Podcast Archive

Governor Mike Hayden Interview
Details
Listen Now
Subscribe - iTunesSubscribe - RSS

More podcasts

-

Popular Item

undated 1977 (Box 49, Folder 4)

-

Random Item

Omar Hawkins photograph collection Omar Hawkins photograph collection

-

Site Statistics

Total images: 597,320
Bookbag items: 35,879
Registered users: 10,938

-

About

Kansas Memory has been created by the Kansas State Historical Society to share its historical collections via the Internet. Read more.

-

Syndication

Matching items: 55

Category Filters

Community Life - Community services - Public health

Search within these results


       

Search Tips

Start Over | RSS Feed RSS Feed

View: Image Only | Title Only | Detailed
Sort by: TitleSort by Title, Ascending | Date | Creator | Newest

Showing 1 - 25 of 55 (results per page: 10 | 25 | 50)
Next Page >


A petition humanity must heed

A petition humanity must heed
Creator: American Medical Association
Date: September 1914
A cartoon showing a baby signing a petition titled "Give me pure milk that I may live". The cartoon appeared in the Bulletin of the Kansas State Board of Health.


Arthur Capper delivering an address on tuberculosis

Arthur Capper delivering an address on tuberculosis
Creator: Underwood & Underwood
Date: June 24, 1930
View of Kansas Senator Arthur Capper at a WMAL Radio microphone delivering an opening address in the world-wide campaign to stamp out tuberculosis. Doris Mead Gasque is standing behind him dressed in a white robe with red cross. Capper, 1865-1951, a native of Garnett, Kansas, served Kansas as Governor, 1915-1919, and U. S. Senator, 1919-1949.


Babies' sore eyes is a dangerous disease

Babies' sore eyes is a dangerous disease
Creator: Kansas. State Board of Health
Date: Between 1900 and 1920
This poster, issued by the Kansas State Board of Health, informs parents about the danger and treatment of Infantile Conjunctivitis and how to avoid needless blindness in children.


Baby will be unhappy and cross

Baby will be unhappy and cross
Creator: Kansas. State Board of Health
Date: Between 1900 and 1920
A poster issued by the Kansas State Board of Health, outlining good infant care.


Baby will be well and happy

Baby will be well and happy
Creator: Kansas. State Board of Health
Date: Between 1900 and 1920
This poster, issued by the Kansas State Board of Health, includes information on good baby care.


Bathing the baby

Bathing the baby
Creator: Kansas. State Board of Health
Date: Between 1900 and 1920
This poster, issued by the Kansas State Board of Health, illustrates how to bathe a baby.


Boys! Girls! kill the flies

Boys! Girls! kill the flies
Creator: Kansas State Board of Health
Date: September, 1914
This advertisement encourages boys and girls to kill flies for a prize. The contest was sponsored by the Board of Health of Hutchinson. The ad was in a publication from the Kansas State Board of Health.


Circular letter no.1 from the Kansas State Board of Health

Circular letter no.1 from the Kansas State Board of Health
Date: Bewteen 1900 and 1920
This letter explains the duty of the health officers and physicians of the state to report deaths to the State Board of Health or be fined $10.


Circular letter no. 2. Prevention of typhoid fever

Circular letter no. 2. Prevention of typhoid fever
Creator: Kansas. State Board of Health
Date: 1897
This letter, issued by the Kansas State Board of Health, outlines ways to prevent typhoid fever; although the cause was not yet fully known. A table shows the typhoid fever death rate per 100,000 of population in five cities in the world. Table 2 compares the death rate in Berlin and Chicago.


Communicable disease classroom chart

Communicable disease classroom chart
Creator: Kansas. Board of Health
Date: Between 1960 and 1962
A classroom chart listing communicable diseases. The material was taken from the rules and regulations of the Kansas State Board of Health. Diseases listed include chickenpox, diphtheria, measles, mumps, scarlet fever, and whooping cough. Also listed are the symptoms, mode of spread, and basic control measures.


Cup

Cup
Date: between 1800 and 1920
Hand-wrought communal iron drinking cup with attached chain. The cup was attached to a rock by the Sulphur Spring public spring near Fort Scott around 1800 and saw continuous use until communal drinking cups were banned by the Kansas State Board of Health in 1909. The cup was replaced by a sanitary drinking fountain on November 1, 1911. Dr. Samuel J. Crumbine, Director of the Board of Health, used the cup in his public health and sanitation campaigns, and it was later displayed at the Paper Cup and Container Institute in New York.


Dangers of self-drugging with proprietary medicines, by Edward Bumgardner, Lawrence, Kansas

Dangers of self-drugging with proprietary medicines, by Edward Bumgardner, Lawrence, Kansas
Date: June 24, 1902
These images show the essay titled "Dangers of Self-Drugging With Proprietary Medicines," by Edward Bumgardner of Lawrence, Kansas. The essay was part of a prize contest on topics for the public good, published under the Latin heading, "Pro Bono Publico." The essay expresses criticism of the advertising, sale, and use of so-called "patent medicines," and reports on the high levels of alcoholic and narcotic ingredients that often made up such remedies. The essay concludes by calling upon newspaper publishers to stop printing advertisements for such medicines, for legislation requiring the ingredients of medicines to be listed on the labels, and for physicians to lead a crusade against such dangerous drugs.


Dr. Clarence Horace Kinnaman, Director of County Health Works and State Epidemiologist

Dr. Clarence Horace Kinnaman, Director of County Health Works and State Epidemiologist
Creator: King, Ernest V., 1874-1964
Date: Between 1935 and 1940
Here are three photographs showing Dr. Clarence Horace Kinnaman, Director of County Health Works and Kansas State Epidemiologist. One photograph shows him at his desk in the Kansas Capitol and the others are portraits. He was born June 30, 1869 in Ottumwa, Iowa, the only son of Dr. and Mrs. Horace A. Kinnaman. He attended public schools in Keokuk, Iowa and graduated from the Keokuk Medical College in 1899. After passing the Iowa State Medical Board examinations, he practiced medicine in his father's office. On October 1, 1917, he was commissioned as a first lieutenant in the Medical Reserve Corps of the United States Army and ordered to Camp Funston, Kansas, with the 89th Division. Dr. Kinnaman was assigned to the Division Surgeon's Office as an assistant to the camp's sanitary inspector. In February 1918, he was made commanding officer of Sanitary Squad No. 2, 314th Sanitary Train, 98th Division, and the following June was assigned to overseas duty. He returned to the United States the following July and was honorably discharged. Dr. Kinnaman came to Kansas on January 1, 1920 to become health officer of Geary County. On September 1, 1922, Dr. Kinnaman accepted an appointment as Director of County Health Work and State Epidemiologist for the Kansas State Board of Health, heading the Division of Communicable Diseases and Rural Sanitation. At the time he accepted this position, Dr. Samuel Crumbine was the State Health Officer. After Dr. Crumbine's resignation in April, 1923, the Kansas Board of Health was involved in turmoil. In 1925, Dr. Kinnaman was made Chief of the Division of Communicable Disease Control and State Epidemiologist. He was involved in a campaign to eradicate diphtheria and fight other diseases. He and his wife Harriet Alice Samuels Kinnaman had three children that lived, Dr. Joseph H. Kinnaman, Ruth Kinnaman O'Malley, and Margaret Kinnaman Schulte. Dr. Kinnaman died on July 9, 1957 at Winter General Hospital in Topeka, Kansas. He and his wife are buried at Oakland National Cemetery in Keokuk, Iowa.


Dr. Samuel Crumbine to hotel proprietors

Dr. Samuel Crumbine to hotel proprietors
Creator: Crumbine, Samuel J. (Samuel Jay), 1862-1954
Date: March 14, 1911
This letter from Dr. S. J. Crumbine, Secretary of the State Board of Health, informs hotel proprietors that the Board has ruled that the use of the common drinking cup in hotels was prohibited as of April 1, 1911.


First aid class, Wichita, Kansas

First aid class, Wichita, Kansas
Creator: United States. Works Progress Administration
Date: Between 1935 and 1943
Men and women learning first aid at a recreation center for servicemen and factory personnel, Minisa Park, Wichita, Kansas. This class was part of the Works Progress Administration


First aid class, Wichita, Kansas

First aid class, Wichita, Kansas
Creator: United States. Works Progress Administration
Date: Between 1935 and 1943
Men and women attending a first aid class at Minisa Park recreation center, Wichita, Kansas. This class was part of the Works Progress Administration.


First aid class, Wichita, Kansas

First aid class, Wichita, Kansas
Creator: United States. Works Progress Administration
Date: Between 1935 and 1943
First aid class at Minisa Park recreation center, Wichita, Kansas. This class was part of the Works Progress Administration.


Fly swatter

Fly swatter
Date: between 1900 and 1950
Flyswatter with black painted wooden handle and black screen swatter. "Swat the Fly" was one of Dr. Samuel J. Crumbine's many public health campaigns, which also included "Bat the Rat", "Don't Spit on the Sidewalk," and efforts to ban communal drinking cups and hand towels.


Fresh air for the babies

Fresh air for the babies
Creator: Kansas. State Board of Health
Date: Between 1900 and 1920
This poster, issued by the Kansas State Board of Health, informs parents how to safely insure their baby has fresh air for his health.


Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence, tuberculosis sanitorium

Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence, tuberculosis sanitorium
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1929-1931 : Reed)
Date: 1929-1931
This file includes subject correspondence relating to the tuberculosis sanitorium. Topics in the correspondence cover but is not limited to sanitorium administration, reports comparing Kansas sanitoriums to other states, and supplies required by the sanitorium. This file is part of a bigger collection of Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence.


Health epigrams

Health epigrams
Date: Between 1900 and 1910
This penny postcard issued by the Kansas State Board of Health includes many epigrams aimed at teaching good public health.


His death or yours!

His death or yours!
Creator: Kansas State Board of Health
Date: 1914
"His Death Or Yours" cartoon addressing the diseases transmitted by flies and encouraging people to install and use screen doors. This item was copied from the Kansas State Board of Health Bulletin.


How to prevent blindness

How to prevent blindness
Creator: Kansas. State Board of Health
Date: Between 1900 and 1920
This poster, issued by the Kansas State Board of Health, informs parents about Infantile Conjunctivitis and how to prevent needless blindness.


In re Walter McGee, George Andrews, and George Buckner, petitioners, Kansas Supreme Court case no. 22,691

In re Walter McGee, George Andrews, and George Buckner, petitioners, Kansas Supreme Court case no. 22,691
Creator: Kansas. Supreme Court
Date: July term 1919
Kansas Supreme Court case no. 22,691, In re Walter McGee, George Andrews, and George Buckner, petitioners, was a challenge to Chapter 205 of the Kansas Laws of 1917. The law permitted the State Board of Health to enact a policy of quarantining men (and women), without a hearing, for the purpose of controlling the spread of venereal diseases. The Kansas State Quarantine Camp for Men, at the State Penitentiary in Lansing, was the place designated for isolating and treating the men, who were taken into custody in Topeka after being examined by the City Health Officer. Topeka passed its own version of the state law, ordinance no. 4832, in 1918, and copies of the ordinance are included in this file. The Kansas Supreme Court denied the petitioners' "application for a writ of habeas corpus" (claim that the state had detained them unlawfully) stating that the State Board of Health's actions were not unreasonable. The attorney representing the petitioners was Elisha Scott, a prominent African American attorney, whose firm later handled the Brown v. Topeka Board of Education case.


Irma Law to Governor Frank Hagaman

Irma Law to Governor Frank Hagaman
Creator: Law, Irma
Date: December 15, 1950
Irma Law, Executive Secretary of the Kansas State Nurses' Association (KSNA), of Topeka, Kansas writes Governor Frank L. Hagaman, also of Topeka, concerning the founding of a state civilian defense program. Law volunteers the services of the KSNA and its 2900 members in support of civilian defense. Law encloses a letter she wrote to Dr. F. C. Beelman, Director of the Kansas State Board of Health on the same issue. Law's letter follows the initiation of a United Nations' police action against North Korea in which the United States military played a dominant role. The Korean conflict further strained the already fragile relations between the U. S. and the communist Soviet Union and China. This "cold war" increased fears of a possible atomic world war and renewed interest in domestic programs for civilian defense.


Showing 1 - 25
Next Page >

Copyright © 2007-2019 - Kansas Historical Society - Contact Us
This website was developed in part with funding provided by the Information Network of Kansas.