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Constitution Hall

Constitution Hall
Date: Possibly between 1857 and 1900
This is a view of Constitution Hall in Lecompton, Kansas. This building was where pro-slavery delegates to the Constitutional Convention debated the divisive issue of slavery in Kansas. It is administered as a state historic site by the Kansas Historical Society. Lecompton Constitution Hall was added to the National Register of Historic places in 1971, and as a National Historic Landmark in 1974.


Constitution Hall, Lecompton, Kansas

Constitution Hall, Lecompton, Kansas
Date: Undated
This photograph represents a sketch from the Kansas State Historical Society publications of the foundation of the capitol building at Lecompton. In 1856, Congress gave $50,000 in financial support to build the capitol which later became part of Lane University and later a high school. Lecompton Constitution Hall was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971, and as a National Historic Landmark in 1974.


Constitution Hall, Lecompton, Kansas

Constitution Hall, Lecompton, Kansas
Date: Undated
This photograph is a representation of Constitution Hall in Lecompton, Kansas. Lecompton Constitution Hall was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971, and as a National Historic Landmark in 1974.


Constitution Hall, Lecompton, Kansas

Constitution Hall, Lecompton, Kansas
Date: 1887
This photograph represents an illustration from "The Century Illustrated Monthly Magazine", Volume 34, page 369 of Constitution Hall in Lecompton, Kansas. Lecompton Constitution Hall was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971, and as a National Historic Landmark in 1974.


Constitution Hall, Lecompton, Kansas

Constitution Hall, Lecompton, Kansas
Date: 1852
This photograph represents an illustration of the State-House, more commonly known as Constiution Hall, in Lecompton, Kansas from Henry Howe's "Historical Collections of the Great West". Lecompton Constitution Hall was added to the National Register of Historic Place in 1971, and as a National Historic Landmark in 1974.


Constitution Hall, Lecompton, Kansas

Constitution Hall, Lecompton, Kansas
Date: 1957
These photographs represent individual views of Constitution Hall in Lecompton, Kansas in 1957. The photographs were taken by staff of the Kansas Historical Society. Lecompton Constitution Hall was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971, and as a National Historic Landmark in 1974.


Constitution Hall, Lecompton, Kansas

Constitution Hall, Lecompton, Kansas
Date: 1908-1955
This series of photographs represent different views of Constitution Hall in Lecompton, Kansas from 1908 through 1955. Several of the photographs were used by the Independent Order of Odd Fellows (I.O.O.F.). Lecompton Constitution Hall was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971, and as a National Historic Landmark in 1974.


Constitution Hall, Lecompton, Kansas

Constitution Hall, Lecompton, Kansas
Date: 1939
A photograph of Constitution Hall in Lecompton, Kansas. In January 1857, the second territorial legislative assembly met on the upper floor of this building. The Kansas Legislature approved the state to operate Constitution Hall State Historic Site in 1986. The site was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1971 and became a National Historic Landmark in 1974.


Constitution Hall, Lecompton, Kansas

Constitution Hall, Lecompton, Kansas
Date: 1908
This building served as the seat of the Kansas Territorial government in 1857 and 1858. The second territorial legislature met here in 1857. The constitutional convention that drafted the Lecompton Constitution also met here. At the time this photo was taken, the building served as the meeting hall for the International Order of Odd Fellows. Lecompton Constitution Hall was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971, and as a National Historic Landmark in 1974.


Constitution Hall, Lecompton, Kansas

Constitution Hall, Lecompton, Kansas
Creator: Kansas State Historical Society
Date: 1957
This is a view of Constitution Hall, Lecompton, Kansas. In 1857, proslavery delegates gathered at the hall and wrote a constitution, which would have brought Kansas into the Union as a slave-holding state. On August 2, 1858, after several attempts to pass the constitution, it was decisively voted down. The building is a state historic site and maintained by the Kansas State Historical Society. Lecompton Constitution Hall was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971, and as a National Historic Landmark in 1974.


Constitution Hall in Lecompton, Kansas

Constitution Hall in Lecompton, Kansas
Date: 1955
Two photographs of Constitution Hall in Lecompton, Kansas. In January 1857 the second territorial legislative assembly met on the upper floor of this building. The Kansas Legislature approved the state to operate Constitution Hall State Historic Site in 1986. The site was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1971 and became a National Historic Landmark in 1974.


Excavations at Constitution Hall, 14DO321

Excavations at Constitution Hall, 14DO321
Date: 1988
In the summer and fall of 1988 Kansas Historic Society archeologists excavated at Constitution Hall in Lecompton, trying to trace the building's construction history prior to renovation. Shown in these photographs are an excavation unit with many artifacts exposed, a turn of the century sidewalk exposed, archeologists uncovering footing for a staircase, an early well, and the interior of the building during excavation after the removal of the floor boards. Constitution Hall was named a National Historical Landmark for its role in the 1857 Lecompton Constitution. The building is also listed in the National Register of Historic Places and as a National Historic Landmark. The hall was constructed in 1855 and functioned in a variety of different roles.


Goodyear Rubber Buttons from Constitution Hall, 14DO321

Goodyear Rubber Buttons from Constitution Hall, 14DO321
Date: 1857-1872
These four buttons were among the many that were recovered from Constitution Hall in Lecompton, Kansas. The four black rubber buttons have back marks that read "N R CO GOODYEAR'S P=T." This is the mark of the Novelty Rubber Company that manufactured these type of buttons between 1853 and 1872. Constitution Hall served as the seat of the Kansas Territorial government in 1857 and 1858. The second territorial legislature met here in 1857 as did the constitutional convention that drafted the Lecompton Constitution. In the summer and fall of 1988 Kansas Historic Society archeologists excavated at Constitution Hall, trying to trace the building's construction history prior to renovation.


Kansas Film Commission site photographs, subject buildings

Kansas Film Commission site photographs, subject buildings
Creator: Kansas Film Commission
Date: 1980s and 1990s
These are panoramic photographs of locations in Kansas created by the Kansas Film Commission to promote scenes to film companies. The panoramics were created by taking individual photos and taping them together. The photographs are arranged alphabetically by subject and then location. This part of the collection contains photographs of buildings, including historic buildings, miscellaneous buildings, office buildings, unique buildings, and warehouses. Lecompton Constitution Hall was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971, and as a National Historic Landmark in 1974.


Kris Kobach and Matt Veatch at Constitution Hall State Historic Site, Lecompton, Kansas

Kris Kobach and Matt Veatch at Constitution Hall State Historic Site, Lecompton, Kansas
Creator: Powell, Matthew
Date: February 10, 2013
Twelve photographs showing Kris Kobach, Kansas Secretary of State and Matt Veatch, state archivist and chief information officer for the Kansas State Historical Society, at Constitution Hall State Historic Site, Lecompton, Kansas. Each spoke on Kansas' First Territorial Elections and the Lecompton Constitution as part of the Bleeding Kansas 2013 lecture series. Tim Rues, site administrator at the Constitution Hall State Historic Site and Paul Bahnmaier, president of the Lecompton Historical Society, also participated in the lecture series. Lecompton Constitutin Hall was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971, and as a National Historic Landmark in 1974.


Lecompton Slavery Capital marker, Lecompton, Kansas

Lecompton Slavery Capital marker, Lecompton, Kansas
Date: 1956
This photograph represents the Historical Marker in Lecompton, Kansas, three miles south Constitutional Hall marking it as the "Lecompton Slavery Capital". The sign was removed from the site in April 1995. Lecompton Constitution Hall was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971, and as a National Historic Landmark in 1974.


Metal Buttons from Constitution Hall, 14DO321

Metal Buttons from Constitution Hall, 14DO321
Date: 1856-1920
These four metal buttons were recovered during excavations in 1988 at Constitution Hall, in Lecompton, by Kansas Historical Society archeologists and crew. Three of the metal buttons have floral designs. The fourth has the wording "J PORTER & CO LIVERPOOL." The hall served as the seat of the Kansas Territorial government in 1857 and 1858 and the constitutional convention that drafted the Lecompton Constitution also met here. Constitution Hall was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971, and as a National Historic Landmark in 1974.


Old Constitution Hall, Lecompton, Kansas

Old Constitution Hall, Lecompton, Kansas
Date: June 21, 1900
This photograph represents an illustration of the Old Constitution Hall from the "Lecompton Sun" in Lecompton, Kansas. Lecompton Constitution Hall was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971, and as a National Historic Landmark in 1974.


Sketch of Constitution Hall and the Democratic Headquarters in Lecompton, Kansas

Sketch of Constitution Hall and the Democratic Headquarters in Lecompton, Kansas
Creator: Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902
Date: 1869
A copy of sketches done by Henry Worrall of Constitution Hall and the Democratic Headquarters in Lecompton, Kansas. Lecompton Constitution Hall was added to the National Register of Historical Places in 1971, and as a National Historic Landmark in 1974.


Third Territorial Capitol, Lecompton, Kansas

Third Territorial Capitol, Lecompton, Kansas
Date: 1883
This photograph represents an illustration from the "History of Kansas", Volume 1 of the third territorial capital, more commonly known as Constitution Hall, in Lecompton, Kansas. Lecompton Constitution Hall was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971, and as a National Historic Landmark in 1974.


View of Constitution Hall in Lecompton, Kansas

View of Constitution Hall in Lecompton, Kansas
Creator: Kansas Industrial Development Commission
Date: 1949
A photograph of Constitution Hall in Lecompton, Kansas. In January 1857 the second territorial legislative assembly met on the upper floor of this building. Although still firmly proslavery, this group removed some of the earlier laws that their antislavery neighbors opposed. The Lecompton Constitutional Convention met that fall in this same second-floor assembly room. The purpose of the convention was to draft a constitution to gain statehood for Kansas. A compromise proved impossible because proslavery men dominated the convention. They created a document that protected slavery no matter how the people of Kansas Territory voted. This was intolerable for their antislavery opponents, who refused to participate in what they considered to be an illegal government. Eventually the Lecompton Constitution was defeated at the national level. It never went into effect. Instead, free-state forces rallied their supporters. They gained control of the territorial legislature in the October 1857 election. Two months later this new legislature was called into special session to deal with critical territorial problems. They met in the same Lecompton assembly hall that their political enemies had controlled only a few weeks before. Here they began to reform the laws of Kansas Territory according to their own beliefs. That work continued during later legislative sessions. In 1858 the assembly was moved from the proslavery capital of Lecompton to the free-state town of Lawrence. The Kansas Legislature approved the state to operate Constitution Hall State Historic Site in 1986. The site was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1971 and became a National Historic Landmark in 1974.


View of Constitution Hall in Lecompton, Kansas

View of Constitution Hall in Lecompton, Kansas
Date: 1953
A photograph of Constitution Hall in Lecompton, Kansas. In January 1857 the second territorial legislative assembly met on the upper floor of this building. Although still firmly proslavery, this group removed some of the earlier laws that their antislavery neighbors opposed. The Lecompton Constitutional Convention met that fall in this same second-floor assembly room. The purpose of the convention was to draft a constitution to gain statehood for Kansas. A compromise proved impossible because proslavery men dominated the convention. They created a document that protected slavery no matter how the people of Kansas Territory voted. This was intolerable for their antislavery opponents, who refused to participate in what they considered to be an illegal government. Eventually the Lecompton Constitution was defeated at the national level. It never went into effect. Instead, free-state forces rallied their supporters. They gained control of the territorial legislature in the October 1857 election. Two months later this new legislature was called into special session to deal with critical territorial problems. They met in the same Lecompton assembly hall that their political enemies had controlled only a few weeks before. Here they began to reform the laws of Kansas Territory according to their own beliefs. That work continued during later legislative sessions. In 1858 the assembly was moved from the proslavery capital of Lecompton to the free-state town of Lawrence. The Kansas Legislature approved the state to operate Constitution Hall State Historic Site in 1986. The site was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1971 and became a National Historic Landmark in 1974.


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