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Albe Burge Whiting

Albe Burge Whiting
Date: Between 1890 and 1900
This cabinet card shows Albe Burge Whiting,(1835-1928). Whiting a native of Johnson, Vermont migrated to the Kansas territory, in 1856, and settled near Fort Riley. He founded the town of Milford and was instrumental in operating a saw mill, general store, and flour mill before moving, in 1877, to Topeka, Kansas. In the capital city, Whiting engaged in a number of business ventures from a partnership in a drug store to owning and operating a paint and glass business. His company also held the contract to supply the windows for the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company building at Ninth and Jackson Streets in Topeka. Whiting's success in business gave him the means to give back to the community. In 1907, Whiting and his wife Kate purchased 160 acres of land which established the Mt. Hope Cemetery in Topeka, as a 1,000 year endowment trust for Washburn University, and the Topeka Y.W.C.A. and Y. M. C. A. In addition to the endowment, Whiting served fifty-one years as a Washburn trustee and was a member of the executive committee. To honor his years of service to the college, the field house at Washburn was named the Whiting Field House in June of 1930. The dedication came two years after the building's completion in December of 1928 and the passing of Albe Burge Whiting.


Albe Burge Whiting

Albe Burge Whiting
Creator: Leonard, J. H.
Date: Between 1900 and 1919
This cabinet card shows Albe Burge Whiting, (1835-1928). Whiting a native of Johnson, Vermont migrated to the Kansas territory in 1856 and settled near Fort Riley. He founded the town of Milford and was instrumental in operating a saw mill, general store, and flour mill before moving, in 1877, to Topeka, Kansas. In the capital city, Whiting engaged in a number of business ventures from a partnership in a drug store to owning and operating a paint and glass business. His company also held the contract to supply the windows for the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railway Company building at Ninth and Jackson Streets in Topeka. Whiting's success in business gave him the means to give back to the community. In 1907, Whiting and his wife Kate purchased 160 acres of land which established the Mt. Hope Cemetery in Topeka as a 1,000 year endowment trust for Washburn University, the Topeka Y.W.C.A. and the Topeka Y. M. C. A. In addition to the endowment, Whiting served fifty-one years as a Washburn trustee and was a member of the executive committee. To honor his years of service to the college, in June of 1930, the field house at Washburn was named the Whiting Field House. The dedication came two years after the building's completion in December of 1928 and the passing of Albe Burge Whiting.


Alonzo B. Webster funeral, Dodge City, Kansas

Alonzo B. Webster funeral, Dodge City, Kansas
Date: April 15, 1887
These three black and white photographs show scenes from Alonzo B. Webster's funeral in Dodge City, Kansas. The former mayor of Dodge City (1881-1883) died on April 12, 1887, at the home of his niece Mrs. M. W. Sutton. He was buried in the Prairie Grove Cemetery north of town.


Art Work on Eastern Kansas

Art Work on Eastern Kansas
Creator: Western Photogravure Company
Date: 1900
This pictorial book gives a brief overview of eastern Kansas. This is part nine of twelve. Views of Manhattan from Mount Prospect, the Jane C. Stormont Hospital and Christ's Hospital in Topeka, and Fort Scott National Cemetery are some of the featured photographs.


Arthur and Ella Valentine's graves in Wichita, Kansas

Arthur and Ella Valentine's graves in Wichita, Kansas
Creator: Tarr, Blair D., b. 1957
Date: April 25, 2003
Here are three photographs of Arthur and Ella Valentine's graves in White Chapel Memorial Gardens in Wichita, Kansas. Arthur was the creator of the Valentine Diner.


Blue River Valley in Pottawatomie County, Kansas

Blue River Valley in Pottawatomie County, Kansas
Creator: Meyer, Philip
Date: 1956
Philip Meyer took a series of photographs showing residents of the Blue River Valley as they prepared to move from their homes and farms as part of the Tuttle Creek reservoir and dam relocation project. He captioned this photograph "after the service, Mrs. Willingham placed flowers on the graves of her parents in the small cemetery near the church. Army Engineers will move cemeteries to nearby hills, although communities which care for them will be dispersed".


Boot Hill Cemetery, Hays, Kansas

Boot Hill Cemetery, Hays, Kansas
Date: 1885
This black and white photograph shows the excavating site of the Boot Hill Cemetery in Hays, Kansas. Located on a hill north of the town of Hays City Kansas, the cemetery was the first in the West to be called Boot Hill. At least seventy-nine outlaws were buried at the site.


Carry Nation's tombstone in Belton, Missouri

Carry Nation's tombstone in Belton, Missouri
Date: Between 1930 and 1935
This photograph shows Carry Nation's tombstone at a cemetery in Belton, Missouri. The dates on the tombstone are 1846-1911. The first line of text is Faithful to the Cause of Prohibition. The second line is "She Hath Done What She Could."


Cemetary - Arras, France

Cemetary - Arras, France
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: 1919
Captain Hughes photographed many locations as he traveled with the Army of Occupation after the close of World War I. This photo, taken in 1919, shows a cemetery in the city of Arras, located in Nord-Pas de Calais, France. James C. Hughes, as part of the 35th Division, left Fort Sill, Oklahoma, and traveled to Hoboken, New Jersey, where he boarded the troop ship "Ceramic" on May 18, 1918. Hughes arrived in Liverpool, England, on June 1, 1918 and then landed at Le Havre, France, on June 9, 1918. Hughes fought in the battles of St. Michael and the Meuse-Argonne. He was at Verdun on Armistice Day, November 11, 1918. He took no photos of the actual fighting. He did take many photographs after the war as part of the Army of Occupation until he left France on July 18, 1919. A full biography of James Clark Hughes is available at the link below to Kansapedia.


Cemetery statue near Beaver, Kansas

Cemetery statue near Beaver, Kansas
Creator: Schremmet, Danah
Date: Unknown
This photograph shows a statue of Saint Joseph in a cemetery, possibly Saint Joseph's cemetery, near Beaver, Kansas.


Chippewa Indian cemetery, Franklin County, Kansas

Chippewa Indian cemetery, Franklin County, Kansas
Date: Between 1930 and 1955
These are four photos of the Chippewa Indian cemetery near Ottawa and one photo of the Ottawa Indian cemetery. All photos were taken by the Kansas State Historical Society.


Chippewa, Ottawa and Munsee Indian cemeteries in Franklin County Kansas

Chippewa, Ottawa and Munsee Indian cemeteries in Franklin County Kansas
Date: 1939
Four photographs from the Chippewa, Ottawa and Munsee Indian Cemeteries.


Chippewa cemetery

Chippewa cemetery
Creator: Romig, Joseph
Date: June 15, 1909
These two items concern the Chippewa cemetery in Ottawa, Kansas. In the letter to H.F. Sheldon, Reverend Joseph Romig explains that he made the drawing of the cemetery when he was in Ottawa, Kansas, in March and April of 1909. The second item, a depiction of the Chippewa cemetery in Ottawa, Kansas, shows the birth and death dates of those interred at the cemetery.


Crane and Davis families in Topeka, Kansas

Crane and Davis families in Topeka, Kansas
Date: Between 1905 and 1910
This is a photograph showing members of the Crane and Davis families at the home on the Topeka Cemetery grounds in Topeka, Kansas. People in the photoraph are front row (left to right) Doris Radcliffe Davis Trace, Alberta Davis (daughter of Dr. Davis), Mollie Crane Davis (daughter of D. O. Crane) and Josephine Radcliffe Davis Jones Terry; and back row (left to right) Anna Sophia Crane Carrie, Will R. Carrie, Mrs. D. O. Crane, D. O. Crane, Franklin Crane (son of D. O. Crane), and Dr. Albert Davis.


DAR markers at Ottawa Indian Burial Grounds, Kansas

DAR markers at Ottawa Indian Burial Grounds, Kansas
Date: 1936
Five photographs of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) markers at the Ottawa Indian Burial Grounds, east of Ottawa, honoring Jotham Meeker, John Tecumseh Jones, Chief Comechau and Notino, the Medicine Man.


Death of Joseph Stibernik

Death of Joseph Stibernik
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1915-1919: Capper)
Date: 1914-1915
This file includes general correspondence relating to the death of Joseph Stibernik. Topics included, but not limited to, in the correspondence is funeral arrangements, receiving and sending death certificates to his home in Austria, and working with the Austria-Hungary consulate in St. Louis, Missouri. This is part of a bigger collection of Governor Arthur Capper correspondence.


Fix Cemetery, Volland, Kansas

Fix Cemetery, Volland, Kansas
Date: Between 1980 and 1985
This is a photograph of the Fix Cemetery located near Volland, Kansas.


Four views of the government cemetery at Fort Wallace, Kansas

Four views of the government cemetery at Fort Wallace, Kansas
Date: Between 1920 and 1930
Four views of the government cemetery at Fort Wallace, Wallace County, Kansas.


Frank Howard

Frank Howard
Date: Between 1942 and 1945
This is a portrait of Frank Howard, who was married to Xavia Earline Hightower-Howard. She was the first female African-American licensed funeral director and embalmer, and she owned the Citizens Funeral Home in Wichita, Kansas.


Franklin Loomis Crane

Franklin Loomis Crane
Creator: Phillips, Wendell, 1811-1884
Date: Between 1861 and 1884
Franklin Crane, 1808-1884, was a prominent citizen in Topeka, Kansas Territory. He was a member of the Topeka Association and he helped to build the first bridge across the Kansas River from Topeka. He also established the Topeka Cemetery and served as director of the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railroad beginning in 1860. This picture was most likely taken after Kansas was admitted to the Union in 1861.


Funeral, Kansas State Hospital

Funeral, Kansas State Hospital
Date: Between 1890 and 1919
A view of men standing near a coffin and an open grave during a funeral service conducted at the Kansas State Hospital in Topeka, Kansas.


Funeral in Humboldt, Allen County, Kansas

Funeral in Humboldt, Allen County, Kansas
Date: Between 1870 and 1900
A funeral procession in Humboldt, Kansas. Horse drawn wagons are visible as well as the Humboldt business district.


Grave marker for David Taylor

Grave marker for David Taylor
Creator: Desmuke, Christine E. (Christine Elaine)
Date: 2012
This is a photograph of David Taylor's grave in Gypsum Hill Cemetery in Salina, Kansas. He was born in 1786 and died at age 117 in 1903.


Grave markers for the Last Indian Raid in Kansas

Grave markers for the Last Indian Raid in Kansas
Creator: Piper, William C.
Date: Between 1930 and 1950
These five black and white photographs show the grave markers for the victims that were killed, September 30, 1878, in the last Indian raid in Kansas. On that day a band of Northern Cheyenne Indians lead by Chief Dull Knife killed nineteen settlers along the Sappa Creek in Oberlin, Kansas before continuing north into Nebraska. The first image is the headstone of James G. Smith. The second photograph is John Young's grave. Thirdly, the grave of John & E.P. Humphrey. The fourth image is the burial site of an Indian girl. The site had been reported earlier as the final resting place for George F. Walters. His body had originally been in a pasture but was moved to Oberlin Cemetery in 1888. The last image is the headstones for William Laing Jr., and Freeman Laing. In the back row to the very right, is Moses F. Abernathy's headstone a victim of the raid.


Grave markers for the last Indian Raid in Kansas

Grave markers for the last Indian Raid in Kansas
Creator: Piper, William C.
Date: Between 1930s and 1950s
These five black and white photographs show the grave markers for the victims that were killed, September 30, 1878, in the last Indian raid in Kansas. On that day a band of Northern Cheyenne Indians lead by Chief Dull Knife killed nineteen settlers along the Sappa Creek in Oberlin, Kansas before continuing north into Nebraska.


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