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Places - Cities and towns - Minneola (Franklin County)

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Adjournment from constitutional convention in Minneola, Kansas

Adjournment from constitutional convention in Minneola, Kansas
Date: March 23, 1858
Motion for adjourning the constitutional convention from Minneola in Franklin County to Leavenworth, Kansas. The motion states, "We have organized temporarily and are now getting ready to adjourn if possible to some other place to show our utter detestation of the Minneola Swindle." The controversy began when the Kansas Legislature passed a bill designating Minneola as the new state capital. The town existed only on paper, and the public accused the legislature and delegates attending the convention of looking for personal gain in establishing a new town. The motion to adjourn from Minneola received 60 votes in favor and 13 votes opposed. Isaac Goodnow wrote about the swindle to a friend on April 1st, 1858 (see Kansas Memory unit 3763).


Capital house in Franklin County

Capital house in Franklin County
Date: 1858
C. A. Myers, 83, an old settler of Franklin County, stands in front of the Capital house. The house was built in 1858 on the Minneola townsite and is now (1976) on the John Turner farm.


Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday
Creator: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: May 15, 1856
Expecting a clash between free state and proslavery forces at Lawrence, Kansas Territory, Cyrus K. Holliday wrote last instructions to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. Despite the threat of violence, Mary was to travel to Topeka, K. T. with Mr. Nichols, where Cyrus had traded shares to Milton C. Dickey for a house. He told her of a debt to E. S. Dexter of Massachusetts and a share in Centropolis, established that year in Franklin County. While emphasizing business matters, Cyrus did not neglect to express his love.


Edmund B. Whitman to George L. Stearns

Edmund B. Whitman to George L. Stearns
Creator: Whitman, E. B. (Edmund Burke), 1812-1883
Date: April 13, 1858
Whitman writes a rather lengthy update on the Kansas Territory situation for Stearns, focusing on the political machinations of the few and the uncertain situation created by the Lecompton debate. Of territorial leadership, Whitman observes: "While Kansas is blessed with many of the truest men of the age, men who are fully up to the emergency, she is also cursed with some of the most unprincipled demagogues that ever afflicted any country." Whitman writes that there is much confusion and disagreement about the best course of action for free state men to take, now that many acknowledged the death of the Topeka movement. He then turns to the work of the Minneola and Leavenworth Constitutional Convention of March, 1858.


Edmund B. Whitman to George L. Stearns

Edmund B. Whitman to George L. Stearns
Creator: Whitman, E. B. (Edmund Burke), 1812-1883
Date: February 20, 1858
This rather lengthy report from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, addresses many issues, especially those surrounding the Lecompton constitutional controversy. With "the Topeka Movement . . . abandoned," the question is what would take its place to resist the Lecompton Constitution if it were accepted by the Congress. The territorial legislature had formally "protested against the admission of Kansas into the Union under the Lecompton Constitution," and "the Mass of the people are determined" to resist its imposition. Whitman makes many other interesting observations about the political situation regarding Democrats and Republicans and even abolitionists: "men who seek here and now, on this issue, to break the back bone of slavery forever." In addition to the political, Whitman describes his "labor of distributing the clothing . . . for the relief of Kansas," and discusses in some detail the financial situation regarding the Committee, his personal debt, Kansas relief, and support to John Brown.


Isaac Tichenor Goodnow to Sherman

Isaac Tichenor Goodnow to Sherman
Creator: Goodnow, Isaac T. (Isaac Tichenor), 1814-1894
Date: April 1 & 3, 1858
Isaac Goodnow wrote from Leavenworth, Kansas Territory, to a friend, expressing his excitement and support for the Leavenworth Constitution. The status of the Lecompton Constitution was currently being debated in Congress, but Goodnow predicted its "destruction". Goodnow described the events of the Constitutional Convention, which had first convened in Minneola, but had been removed to Leavenworth. He stated that the finished constitution was" the best Constitution in existence", and remarked at James Lane's leading role in its development.


Mark W. Delahay to Samuel N. Wood

Mark W. Delahay to Samuel N. Wood
Creator: Delahay, Mark W. (Mark William), 1818?-1879
Date: November 18, 1859
From Leavenworth, Kansas Territory, Delahay responds to Samuel Wood's November 14th request that Delahay come to "the Grove" [Council Grove] to assist with the election campaign. Delahay is not sure he could make this long trip, since "our court commences" on the first Monday of December, and he expects to be busy with the local campaign. Delahay ends by asking Wood to help secure for him the position of "chief clerk" in the territorial legislature, "the office that I was by base treachery last winter swindled out of . . ."


Minneola Capitol

Minneola Capitol
Date: 1858
Drawing of the proposed state capitol, which was to be built in Minneola, Kansas.


Samuel F. Tappan to Thomas W. Higginson

Samuel F. Tappan to Thomas W. Higginson
Creator: Tappan, S. F. (Samuel Forster), d. 1913
Date: March 15, 1858
In this letter, written from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, Samuel Tappan informs Thomas W. Higginson of the state of affairs in Kansas Territory. He begins by mentioning the constitutional convention that would soon meet at Minneola and hopes that the free state side would be triumphant. Tappan also mentions the recent election for mayor of Lawrence, stating that Carmi Babcock won over James Blood. The last page, tacked on as if it were a separate note, gives a brief summary of where influential leaders were currently located, so Higginson would know of their whereabouts.


United States versus Amos Banks for larceny

United States versus Amos Banks for larceny
Date: bond March 27, 1860
This case file contains a bail bond for Amos Banks issued by Justice of the Peace Joseph Welsh on March 27, 1860 in the Kansas Territory. The bond states Banks is accused of committing larceny on land belonging to the Sac and Fox tribe. Banks was ordered to appear at Welsh's office in the now-defunct town of Minneola, Franklin County on May 1, 1860. During the territorial period, the Sac and Fox tribe owned land near Doniphan County as well as land near Osage County. The Sac and Fox people were forcibly relocated to land west of the Mississippi river in the 1830s following the Black Hawk War.


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