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Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln
A portrait of Abraham Lincoln, the sixteenth President of the United States. He successfully led the country through its greatest internal crisis, the Civil War, saving the Union and ending slavery, only to be assassinated as the war was virtually over. Before becoming the first Republican elected to the Presidency, Lincoln was a lawyer, an Illinois state legislator, and a member of the United States House of Representatives.


Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln
Creator: Jackson, Calvin
Date: Oct. 01, 1858
A photograph of Abraham Lincoln taken at the time of the Douglas- Lincoln debates.


Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln
Creator: Hesler, Alex, 1823-1895
Date: June 3, 1860
This black and white photograph shows Abraham Lincoln during his campaign for the U.S. Presidency. A lawyer from Springfield, Illinois who began his political career as an Illinois state legislator and later was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives. He became the sixteenth President of the United States on November 6, 1860. As commander in chief he guided the country through the difficult years of the Civil War and signed into law legislation that respected and maintain human freedom for all individuals.


Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln
Creator: Brady, Mathew B., 1823 (ca.)-1896
Date: February 1860
This black and white negative shows Abraham Lincoln. A lawyer from Springfield, Illinois who began his political career as an Illinois state legislator and was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives. He became the sixteenth President of the United States on November 6, 1860. As commander in chief he guided the country through the difficult years of the Civil War and signed into law legislation that respected and maintain human freedom for all individuals.


Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln
Date: Between 1859 and 1860
This sepia colored photograph shows Abraham Lincoln. A lawyer from Springfield, Illinois who began his political career as an Illinois state legislator and later was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives. He became the sixteenth President of the United States on November 6, 1860. As commander in chief he guided the country through the difficult years of the Civil War and signed into law legislation that respected and maintain human freedom for all individuals.


Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln
Date: 1850s
A portrait of Abraham Lincoln. In December 1859, Lincoln traveled to the Kansas Territory and spoke at Elwood, Troy, Doniphan, Atchison, and Leavenworth. His speeches covered several issues including preventing the expansion of slavery, the theory of popular sovereignty, and the evils of states seceding from the Union. In 1860, Lincoln received the Republican party's nomination for president. Although Kansans liked him the delegation from the territory did not support his nomination. He won the election, and on February 22, 1861, at Independence Hall, Philadelphia, PA, Lincoln raised the United States flag bearing a 34th star, honoring Kansas as the newest state.


Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln
Date: 1862
An engraving of Abraham Lincoln, sixteenth President of the United States. He successfully led the country through the Civil War, saving the Union and ending slavery, only to be assassinated as the war was virtually over. Before becoming the first Republican elected to the Presidency, Lincoln was a lawyer, an Illinois state legislator, and a member of the United States House of Representatives.


Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln
Date: 1861
An engraving of Abraham Lincoln, the sixteenth President of the United States. He successfully led the country through its greatest internal crisis, the Civil War, saving the Union and ending slavery, only to be assassinated as the war was virtually over. Before becoming the first Republican elected to the Presidency, Lincoln was a lawyer, an Illinois state legislator, and a member of the United States House of Representatives.


Abraham Lincoln raising the thirty-four star flag

Abraham Lincoln raising the thirty-four star flag
Creator: Richards, F. De B. (Frederick De Bourg)
Date: February 22, 1861
This is an illustration showing President Abraham Lincoln hoisting the American flag with thirty-four stars upon Independence Hall, Philadelphia, February 22, 1861. Copied from Harper's Weekly, March 9, 1861.


Abraham Lincoln to Mark W. Delahay

Abraham Lincoln to Mark W. Delahay
Creator: Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865
Date: May 14, 1859
Lincoln regretfully declines an invitation to attend the Osawatomie convention on May 18, 1859, which was to formally organize the Republican Party in Kansas. Lincoln warns against "the temptation to lower the Republican Standard [in whatever platform the convention might adopt] in order to gather recruits. "In my judgment," Lincoln continues, "such a step would be a serious mistake" that "would surrender the object of the Republican organization-- preventing the Spread and Nationalization of Slavery." This two-page, handwritten copy of a letter sent by Abraham Lincoln to Mark Delahay was probably given to the Kansas Historical Society by Delahay's daughter, Mary E. Delahay, in the early 1900s.


A joint resolution to amend the constitution of the United States

A joint resolution to amend the constitution of the United States
Creator: United States. President (1861-1865 : Lincoln)
Date: March 16, 1861
This document is a copy of a joint resolution to amend the constitution of the United States, sent to the governor of Kansas. Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America that Article XIII be "proposed to the legislatures of the several States as an amendment to the Constitution of the United States which when ratified by three-fourths of said legislatures shall be valid to all intents and purposes as part of the said Constitution." Article XIII - "No amendment shall be made to the Constitution which will authorize or give to Congress the power to abolish or interfere within any state with the domestic institutions thereof, including that of persons held to labor or service by the laws of said State."


Boston Corbett correspondence

Boston Corbett correspondence
Date: 1866-1888
Letters received by Thomas P. "Boston" Corbett, known by most as the man who killed John Wilkes Booth following President Lincoln's assassination. Corbett moved to Kansas in 1878 and lived in a dugout near Concordia, Kansas. In 1887, Corbett was given the position of assistant doorkeeper for the Kansas House of Representatives in Topeka. However, when he brandished his pistol during a session of the legislative that same year, he was arrested and sent to the Topeka Asylum for the Insane.


Charles and Sarah Robinson correspondence

Charles and Sarah Robinson correspondence
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: 1861-1862
Correspondence between Charles Robinson, the first Governor of Kansas, his wife Sara, and others, mostly involving activities in the fight for a non-slavery Kansas. Some of the people discussed are Abraham Lincoln, James H. Lane, and Charles Jennison.


Gallows crossbeam fragment

Gallows crossbeam fragment
Date: between 1860 and 1865
Fragment of the crossbeam from gallows scaffold. Long rectangular pine block. The beam was part of the scaffold used to execute the conspirators of Abraham Lincoln's assassination. The following individuals were hanged from this scaffold on 7 July 1865: David E. Herold, George A. Atzerodt, Lewis Payne, and Mary Surratt. After the execution, the scaffold was disassembled and housed in the Washington (D.C.) Barracks. While pieces of lumber from the gallows were reused in other projects, the crossbeam was hidden to discourage souvenir hunters. In 1885, the secretary of the Kansas Historical Society wrote to the Quartermaster's Office at the Washington Barracks and requested a piece of the gallows for the Society's collections. Lieutenant Sebree Smith sent this fragment, along with a letter of authentication from a man who worked there when the pieces of the gallows were brought to the barracks.


Grace Bedell Billings

Grace Bedell Billings
Date: 1875
This is a portrait of Grace Bedell Billings, who sent Abraham Lincoln a letter on October 5, 1860, from Westfield, New York, urging him to grow a beard to improve his appearance. Lincoln responded in a letter on October 19, 1860, making no promises; however, within a month, he grew a full beard. She later married a Union soldier and settled in Delphos, Kansas.


Henry Adams to William Hutchinson

Henry Adams to William Hutchinson
Creator: Adams, Henry J., 1816-1870
Date: November 14, 1860
Henry J. Adams was in Washington, D. C., as a special agent of Kansas Territory attempting to convince the U.S. Congress to pay claims for damages suffered by Kansas citizens during episodes of violence in the territory. Adams reported on the prospects of getting the claims paid during the upcoming session of Congress as well as on his concerns about being compensated for his lobbying efforts. He expressed particular concern that Charles Robinson intended to cheat him out of his pay. Adams also commented on Abraham Lincoln's election as president, and the possible secession of Southern states in response to the election results.


J. W. Robinson to Isaac Goodnow

J. W. Robinson to Isaac Goodnow
Creator: Robinson, John W
Date: November 12, 1860
John W. Robinson wrote from his home in Manhattan, Kansas Territory, to Isaac Goodnow. Robinson had given Goodnow authority to sell some of his Manhattan properties and thanked him for his assistance as he was in great need of money. Robinson enthusiastically reacted to Lincoln's recent election to the Presidency, and claimed "even the Democrats assert that they are gratified at the result." He stated his belief that Kansas would be admitted to statehood early in the Legislative session. Robinson also discussed Manhattan's recent development projects, including new roads and a pontoon bridge.


John McArthur to Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States

John McArthur to Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States
Creator: McArthur, John, 1826-1906
Date: December 17, 1864
John McArthur to Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, discussing Smith's Guerillas and asking for promotion of several officers: Col. William Linn McMillan, Col. Lucius Frederick Hubbard, and Col. Sylvester G. Hill.


John McCannon to James Montgomery

John McCannon to James Montgomery
Creator: McCannon, John
Date: May, 1860
John McCannon, writing from Denver City, Araphahoe County, Kansas Territory, a location that is currently in Colorado, describes the killing of a man named Akins, who McCannon claimed had been killed by pro-slavery supporters. McCannon also comments favorably upon the Republican Party's nomination of Abraham Lincoln as its presidential candidate.


John Milton Hay to Mark W. Delahay

John Milton Hay to Mark W. Delahay
Creator: Hay, John, 1838-1905
Date: July 29, 1862
This letter from John Milton Hay, Abraham Lincoln's private secretary and assistant, to Mark W. Delahay, replying on behalf of the President, is a confidential communication concerning a course of political action.


John Palmer Usher

John Palmer Usher
Creator: Corwin, E.H.
Date: Between 1870 and 1879
This cabinet card shows John Palmer Usher (1816-1889), a lawyer from Indiana, who served as U. S. Secretary of the Interior in President Abraham Lincoln's cabinet. Usher served only two years (1863-1865) before returning to private life. In 1865, he become the chief counsel for the Kansas Pacific Railroad; a position he held until his retirement in 1880. Usher, also, resumed his political career, when he moved to Lawrence, Kansas, in 1872, and was elected to one term as the town's mayor (1879 to 1881). On April 13, 1889, at the age of seventy-three, Usher passed away at the University Hospital in Philadelphia after a lengthy illness. He is burial at the Oak Hill Cemetery in Lawrence, Kansas.


John Palmer Usher

John Palmer Usher
Date: Between 1860 and 1865
This black and white photograph shows John Palmer Usher, (1816-1889). A lawyer from Indiana and a member of President Abraham Lincoln's cabinet. Usher served only two years as the seventh U.S. Secretary of the Interior, (1863-1865), before returning to private life. In 1865, he become the chief counsel for the Kansas Pacific Railroad a position he held until his retirement in 1880. Usher also resumed his political career when he moved to Lawrence, Kansas, in 1872, and was elected to serve one term as the town's mayor, (1879 to 1881). On April 13, 1889, at the age of seventy-three, he passed away at the University Hospital in Philadelphia after a lengthy illness. Burial was at the Oak Hill Cemetery in Lawrence, Kansas.


Kansas Adjutant General general correspondence

Kansas Adjutant General general correspondence
Creator: Kansas. Adjutant General's Office
Date: 1864
This is correspondence sent and received by the Kansas Adjutant General's Office. Cyrus K. Holliday succeeded Guilford Dudley as Adjutant General in May 1864. Topics of this correspondence include hospital reports from Fort Scott, requests for more appointments of medical officers, transmittal of muster rolls, a list of volunteers from Wisconsin who enlisted in Kansas, and letters from Elizabeth Pearsons Clouse inquiring about her son, Benjamin Franklin Pearsons. Correspondence was frequently exchanged with Lieutenant J.R. Kemble, General John B. Gray, Assistant Provost Marshal Sidney Clarke, Provost Marshal James McCahon, and Provost Marshal A.J. Shannon. Also included are letters from newspaper publishers requesting payment for printing General and Special Orders, including a young Marshall M. Murdock from the Burlingame Chronicle. A letter dated January 31, 1864 from President Abraham Lincoln orders the draft of 500,000 men. A searchable, full-text version of this correspondence is available by clicking "Text Version" below.


Leigh R. Webber to Esteemed Friend

Leigh R. Webber to Esteemed Friend
Creator: Webber, L. R.
Date: September 20, 1862
A letter written by Leigh R. Webber from Trenton, Tennessee, likely addressed to a member of the John Stillman Brown family. Webber describes a "jayhawking trip" his regiment took to take goods and food from a local Confederate family. He discusses the treatment of slaves and escaped slaves, both by Confederate locals and his fellow Union troops. A portion of the letter states Webber's opinions on James H. Lane's efforts to arm African-American troops in Kansas.


Lincoln in Kansas

Lincoln in Kansas
Creator: Kansas State Historical Society
Date: December 3, 1859
This article was published in the Kansas Historical Collections and includes synopses of Lincoln's speeches during his visit to Kansas in 1859, reminiscences of those present during his visit, and background material and annotations.


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