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75,000 Legionnaires capture New York

75,000 Legionnaires capture New York
Creator: Illustrated Current News, Inc.
Date: August 29, 1952
These are picturegrams from the American Legion Convention in New York in 1952. "As some 3 million New Yorkers cheer their lagging footsteps, the delegates to the American Legion Convention, West Point Cadets, many bands, etc., parade on Fifth Ave. for 9 1/2 hours." 1. A zany 'Leapin Lena' gives the crowd a lot of laughs. 2. Presidential candidate Dwight D. Eisenhower, and Harry W. Colmery, march with the Kansas delegation. 3. Claude Buzich, Minneapolis, gives a reluctant policeman a great big kiss.


A.S. Harris to Thaddeus Hyatt

A.S. Harris to Thaddeus Hyatt
Creator: Harris, A S.
Date: September 22, 1856
A.S. Harris wrote from New York to Thaddeus Hyatt regarding an article in the Journal of Commerce that dealt with the upcoming Presidential election and the strife in Kansas. The clipping was attached to the letter, and it included a rather lengthy attack on emigrant aid societies.


Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln
A portrait of Abraham Lincoln, the sixteenth President of the United States. He successfully led the country through its greatest internal crisis, the Civil War, saving the Union and ending slavery, only to be assassinated as the war was virtually over. Before becoming the first Republican elected to the Presidency, Lincoln was a lawyer, an Illinois state legislator, and a member of the United States House of Representatives.


Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln
Date: 1862
An engraving of Abraham Lincoln, sixteenth President of the United States. He successfully led the country through the Civil War, saving the Union and ending slavery, only to be assassinated as the war was virtually over. Before becoming the first Republican elected to the Presidency, Lincoln was a lawyer, an Illinois state legislator, and a member of the United States House of Representatives.


Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln
Creator: Jackson, Calvin
Date: Oct. 01, 1858
A photograph of Abraham Lincoln taken at the time of the Douglas- Lincoln debates.


Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln
Date: 1850s
A portrait of Abraham Lincoln. In December 1859, Lincoln traveled to the Kansas Territory and spoke at Elwood, Troy, Doniphan, Atchison, and Leavenworth. His speeches covered several issues including preventing the expansion of slavery, the theory of popular sovereignty, and the evils of states seceding from the Union. In 1860, Lincoln received the Republican party's nomination for president. Although Kansans liked him the delegation from the territory did not support his nomination. He won the election, and on February 22, 1861, at Independence Hall, Philadelphia, PA, Lincoln raised the United States flag bearing a 34th star, honoring Kansas as the newest state.


Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln
Date: 1861
An engraving of Abraham Lincoln, the sixteenth President of the United States. He successfully led the country through its greatest internal crisis, the Civil War, saving the Union and ending slavery, only to be assassinated as the war was virtually over. Before becoming the first Republican elected to the Presidency, Lincoln was a lawyer, an Illinois state legislator, and a member of the United States House of Representatives.


Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln
Date: Between 1859 and 1860
This sepia colored photograph shows Abraham Lincoln. A lawyer from Springfield, Illinois who began his political career as an Illinois state legislator and later was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives. He became the sixteenth President of the United States on November 6, 1860. As commander in chief he guided the country through the difficult years of the Civil War and signed into law legislation that respected and maintain human freedom for all individuals.


Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln
Creator: Brady, Mathew B., 1823 (ca.)-1896
Date: February 1860
This black and white negative shows Abraham Lincoln. A lawyer from Springfield, Illinois who began his political career as an Illinois state legislator and was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives. He became the sixteenth President of the United States on November 6, 1860. As commander in chief he guided the country through the difficult years of the Civil War and signed into law legislation that respected and maintain human freedom for all individuals.


Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln
Creator: Hesler, Alex, 1823-1895
Date: June 3, 1860
This black and white photograph shows Abraham Lincoln during his campaign for the U.S. Presidency. A lawyer from Springfield, Illinois who began his political career as an Illinois state legislator and later was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives. He became the sixteenth President of the United States on November 6, 1860. As commander in chief he guided the country through the difficult years of the Civil War and signed into law legislation that respected and maintain human freedom for all individuals.


Abraham Lincoln raising the thirty-four star flag

Abraham Lincoln raising the thirty-four star flag
Creator: Richards, F. De B. (Frederick De Bourg)
Date: February 22, 1861
This is an illustration showing President Abraham Lincoln hoisting the American flag with thirty-four stars upon Independence Hall, Philadelphia, February 22, 1861. Copied from Harper's Weekly, March 9, 1861.


Abraham Lincoln to Mark W. Delahay

Abraham Lincoln to Mark W. Delahay
Creator: Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865
Date: May 14, 1859
Lincoln regretfully declines an invitation to attend the Osawatomie convention on May 18, 1859, which was to formally organize the Republican Party in Kansas. Lincoln warns against "the temptation to lower the Republican Standard [in whatever platform the convention might adopt] in order to gather recruits. "In my judgment," Lincoln continues, "such a step would be a serious mistake" that "would surrender the object of the Republican organization-- preventing the Spread and Nationalization of Slavery." This two-page, handwritten copy of a letter sent by Abraham Lincoln to Mark Delahay was probably given to the Kansas Historical Society by Delahay's daughter, Mary E. Delahay, in the early 1900s.


A joint resolution to amend the constitution of the United States

A joint resolution to amend the constitution of the United States
Creator: United States. President (1861-1865 : Lincoln)
Date: March 16, 1861
This document is a copy of a joint resolution to amend the constitution of the United States, sent to the governor of Kansas. Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America that Article XIII be "proposed to the legislatures of the several States as an amendment to the Constitution of the United States which when ratified by three-fourths of said legislatures shall be valid to all intents and purposes as part of the said Constitution." Article XIII - "No amendment shall be made to the Constitution which will authorize or give to Congress the power to abolish or interfere within any state with the domestic institutions thereof, including that of persons held to labor or service by the laws of said State."


Albert D. Searl to Thaddeus Hyatt

Albert D. Searl to Thaddeus Hyatt
Creator: Searl, Albert D
Date: August 21, 1856
The author wrote from Tabor, Iowa to Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee. He began the letter by mentioning a skirmish between pro-slavery and free state forces somewhere between Lawrence and Topeka. This correspondence also deals with emigrant settlements within the territory, the shipment of weapons and provisions, and the morale among the emigrants as they struggled to make ends meet. Furthermore, Searl mentioned a great deal about James Lane and his activities within Kansas Territory.


Alfred Mossman Landon

Alfred Mossman Landon
Date: September 03, 1936
Governor Alfred M. Landon in Des Moines, Iowa, with other dignitaries: President Roosevelt, Governor Hearring, Iowa; Senator Duffy, Wisconsin; Senator Dickinson, Iowa; Senator McGill, Kansas; Governor Cochran, Nebraska; Governor Peterson, Minnesota; and Senator Shipstead, Minnesota. The occasion is unknown.


Amos A. Lawrence to Charles Robinson

Amos A. Lawrence to Charles Robinson
Creator: Lawrence, Amos Adams
Date: January 31, 1856
Amos Lawrence writes from Boston, Massachusetts, to advise his friend, Charles Robinson, to submit to the authority of recognized officers of the U.S. government, no matter how unjust their actions appeared. Lawrence suggests that Robinson follow the "Fabian policy" of non-violent, peaceful resistance, and do what he could to discourage "all aggression" on the part of free-state men.


Andrew Frank Schoeppel

Andrew Frank Schoeppel
Date: Between 1953 and 1961
Andrew Schoeppel, United States Senator from Kansas, with Richard Milhous Nixon, Vice President of the United States, and Dwight David Eisenhower, President of the United States.


Andrew H. Reeder to Charles Robinson

Andrew H. Reeder to Charles Robinson
Creator: Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864
Date: February 16, 1856
From "Washington City" on February 16, 1856, former Kansas Territory governor Andrew H. Reeder wrote Charles Robinson regarding Reeder's efforts to influence Kansas Territory policy in the nation's capital. Reeder was working through friends, since he no longer had personal influence with President Pierce, and he was not pleased with the president's February 11 proclamation, which he called "the low contemptible trickstering affair which might expected from Pierce, and is like the Special Message [of January 24] a slander on the Free State Party." Nevertheless, Reeder thought it could have been worse and insisted that Robinson and the other free-state leaders "should not organize the State Govt" as Pierce would just use that action to justify aggressive moves to suppress the free state movement.


Andrew H. Reeder to John A. Halderman

Andrew H. Reeder to John A. Halderman
Creator: Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864
Date: October 22, 1856
Former Kansas Territory Governor Andrew H. Reeder writes to John Halderman from Easton, Pennsylvania, regarding his business affairs and his desire to have Halderman act as his attorney and agent. Reeder also gives brief attention to the political situation in Kansas Territory and the nation, mentioning the congressional committee investigating the Kansas affairs, the "horrible state of things . . .in our unfortunate Territory," and his belief that, although James Buchanan would win the presidential contest in 1856, "the Republican party is bound to sweep the North within the next four years."


Andrieus A. Jones to Edmund G. Ross

Andrieus A. Jones to Edmund G. Ross
Creator: Ross, Edmund G. (Edmund Gibson), 1826-1907
Date: June 26, 1896
Jones acknowledges receipt of copies of Ross's history of the presidential impeachment trial and will share it with leading Democrats in Chicago during the campaign convention.


Are these noble statesmen and lawmakers fighting for the interests of the workers? Oh, dear, NO

Are these noble statesmen and lawmakers fighting for the interests of the workers? Oh, dear, NO
Creator: Walker, Ryan, 1870-1932
Date: June 1, 1912
Political cartoon drawn by Ryan Walker for the socialist newspaper, Appeal to Reason, which was published in Girard, Kansas. The cartoon depicts a concerned worker watching Republican presidential candidate William Taft and Progressive presidential candidate Theodore Roosevelt brawl and curse. Socialist candidate Eugene Debs and his running mate Emil Seidel received 6% of the popular vote in the 1912 election.


Arthur Capper and President Herbert Hoover

Arthur Capper and President Herbert Hoover
Creator: Henry Miller News Picture Service
Date: May 19, 1930
A view of Kansas Senator Arthur Capper (fourth from the left in the front row) with a large group of advertising men and women, who have gathered outside of the White House, with President Herbert Hoover. Capper, 1865-1951, a native of Garnett, Kansas, served Kansas as Governor, 1915-1919, and U. S. Senator, 1919-1949.


Arthur Capper and President Herbert Hoover with Kansas farmers

Arthur Capper and President Herbert Hoover with Kansas farmers
Creator: International News Photos, Inc
Date: December 12, 1929
This is a photograph of Senator Arthur Capper, shown standing with President Herbert Hoover in the center of the photograph, and a group of Kansas farmers in Washington, D.C. Arthur Capper, 1865-1951, a native of Garnett, Kansas, served as Kansas Governor from 1915 to 1919, and U. S. Senator from 1919 to 1949.


Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Company's famous passengers

Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Company's famous passengers
Date: Between 1950 and 1959
This black and white photograph shows Margaret Truman Daniel, daughter of the thirty-third President of the United States Harry S. Truman ,standing on the steps of an Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Company's passenger train.


Barstow Darrach to Samuel L. Adair

Barstow Darrach to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Darrach, Barstow
Date: November 27, 1856
Dr. Barstow Darrach had returned to New York Hospital after being in Kansas Territory. He wrote that he felt the prospects were not very favorable for Kansas Territory. He had found "some warm friends disposed to yield Kansas to the slave power rather than resort to a revolution," and he believed [President] Buchanan would only pretend to support freedom "until the south can make sure of their prize." Darrach felt it would take a large emigration of settlers to Kansas to make it a free state, and that free state settlers would be thwarted by the "bogus authority" and "another mob from Mo." should the Free State party appear at the polls. He stated that "the strongest argument [against success] that I see is that the people do not seem prepared." He wrote that he would ship clothing, flannel cloth, and blankets to Adair by way of W. F. M. Arny in Chicago.


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