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Albe Burge Whiting

Albe Burge Whiting
Date: Between 1890 and 1900
This cabinet card shows Albe Burge Whiting,(1835-1928). Whiting a native of Johnson, Vermont migrated to the Kansas territory, in 1856, and settled near Fort Riley. He founded the town of Milford and was instrumental in operating a saw mill, general store, and flour mill before moving, in 1877, to Topeka, Kansas. In the capital city, Whiting engaged in a number of business ventures from a partnership in a drug store to owning and operating a paint and glass business. His company also held the contract to supply the windows for the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company building at Ninth and Jackson Streets in Topeka. Whiting's success in business gave him the means to give back to the community. In 1907, Whiting and his wife Kate purchased 160 acres of land which established the Mt. Hope Cemetery in Topeka, as a 1,000 year endowment trust for Washburn University, and the Topeka Y.W.C.A. and Y. M. C. A. In addition to the endowment, Whiting served fifty-one years as a Washburn trustee and was a member of the executive committee. To honor his years of service to the college, the field house at Washburn was named the Whiting Field House in June of 1930. The dedication came two years after the building's completion in December of 1928 and the passing of Albe Burge Whiting.


Albe Burge Whiting

Albe Burge Whiting
Creator: Leonard, J. H.
Date: Between 1900 and 1919
This cabinet card shows Albe Burge Whiting, (1835-1928). Whiting a native of Johnson, Vermont migrated to the Kansas territory in 1856 and settled near Fort Riley. He founded the town of Milford and was instrumental in operating a saw mill, general store, and flour mill before moving, in 1877, to Topeka, Kansas. In the capital city, Whiting engaged in a number of business ventures from a partnership in a drug store to owning and operating a paint and glass business. His company also held the contract to supply the windows for the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railway Company building at Ninth and Jackson Streets in Topeka. Whiting's success in business gave him the means to give back to the community. In 1907, Whiting and his wife Kate purchased 160 acres of land which established the Mt. Hope Cemetery in Topeka as a 1,000 year endowment trust for Washburn University, the Topeka Y.W.C.A. and the Topeka Y. M. C. A. In addition to the endowment, Whiting served fifty-one years as a Washburn trustee and was a member of the executive committee. To honor his years of service to the college, in June of 1930, the field house at Washburn was named the Whiting Field House. The dedication came two years after the building's completion in December of 1928 and the passing of Albe Burge Whiting.


Art Work on Eastern Kansas

Art Work on Eastern Kansas
Creator: Western Photogravure Company
Date: 1900
This pictorial book gives a brief overview of eastern Kansas. This is part eleven of twelve. Views of Bridal Veil Park in Fort Scott, the Kansas City stock yards, and Washburn College in Topeka are some of the featured photographs.


Bird's eye view of the city of Topeka, Shawnee County, Kansas

Bird's eye view of the city of Topeka, Shawnee County, Kansas
Creator: Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902
Date: 1887
Tlhis lithograph is a bird's eye view of Topeka, Shawnee County, Kansas. It is an advertisement for the sale of land by Strickler, Daniels, & Pounds, real estate, loans, and investments and by the Investment Banking Company. The same people are involved in both business. Buildings/institutions identified in the legend at the bottom include the State Capitol, Bethany College, the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railroad shops, the State Reform School, Washburn College, State Insane Asylum, Potwin Place, and the State Fair Grounds. Some parts of the lithograph show detail on buildings and other are not very distinct. A number of other railroad lines are shown, in addition to AT&SF. The Kansas River runs through the northern portion of Topeka. Two areas, Washburn Place and Euclid Park, are shown and they are possibly real estate developments for the company producing the lithograph.


Boswell Hall at Washburn University, Topeka, Kansas

Boswell Hall at Washburn University, Topeka, Kansas
Date: Between 1886 and 1900
This is a photograph of Boswell Hall, located at Washburn University in Topeka, Kansas.


C. Robert Haywood

C. Robert Haywood
Date: Between 1970 and 1975
This is a photograph of C. [Clarence] Robert Haywood, who was born August 27, 1921. Haywood grew up on a farm in Ford County, Kansas, south of Dodge City, during the Dust Bowl period. He went to Dodge City Junior College, spent time in the Navy during World War II, and then attended the University of Kansas where he obtained his B.A. (1947) and M.A. (1948) in history. He taught history at Southwestern College in Winfield, Kansas, then completed his Ph.D. at the University of North Carolina (1956). Later, he became Dean of Southwestern, and then of Millikin University, Decatur, Illinois, and from 1969 to 1982 he served as vice president of Academic Affairs at Washburn University. Haywood returned to the classroom as distinguished Professor of History at Washburn for several years before his retirement. Over the years, he has been a popular speaker and author of books and articles on the history of Kansas and the West.


C. Robert Haywood

C. Robert Haywood
Date: Between 1995 and 2000
This is a photograph of C. [Clarence] Robert Haywood, who was born August 27, 1921. Haywood grew up on a farm in Ford County, Kansas, south of Dodge City, during the Dust Bowl period. He went to Dodge City Junior College, spent time in the Navy during World War II, and then attended the University of Kansas where he obtained his B.A. (1947) and M.A. (1948) in history. He taught history at Southwestern College in Winfield, Kansas, then completed his Ph.D. at the University of North Carolina (1956). Later, he became Dean of Southwestern, and then of Millikin University, Decatur, Illinois, and from 1969 to 1982 he served as vice president of Academic Affairs at Washburn University. Haywood returned to the classroom as distinguished Professor of History at Washburn for several years before his retirement. Over the years, he has been a popular speaker and author of books and articles on the history of Kansas and the West.


Charles Boswell

Charles Boswell
Date: Between 1880 and 1884
This black and white illustration shows Charles Boswell, (1802-1884), benefactor for Washburn University. Boswell was born in 1802 in Norwich, Connecticut, where he made his fortune as a wholesale grocer and banker. In the latter part of his life he was also associated with the Hartford Fire Insurance Company. When Boswell moved to West Hartford, Connecticut, in 1860, his interest turned to education and helping struggling colleges in the west. One of the many colleges that benefited from his financial assistance was Washburn College in Topeka, Kansas. In 1884, Boswell gave the college ten thousand dollars toward the building of a library with the stipulation that five thousand additional dollars were to be raised. The challenge was meet and when the native limestone structure was completed, in 1886, the building was dedicated the Boswell Library. Boswell also established a $10,000.00 endowment at Washburn in memory of his only son who died during his junior year at Yale University. When Boswell passed away in October of 1884, he left provisions in his will that established a trust fund for Washburn and made the college a one-third residuary legatee of his estate.


Charles Gordon scrapbook

Charles Gordon scrapbook
Date: 1945-1991 (bulk 1945-1956)
This scrapbook documents the athletic activities of Topekan Charles (Chick) Gordon, primarily during the period 1945-1951. During that time, Gordon was a standout athlete first at Topeka High School, then at Washburn University. He excelled at both basketball and baseball. In basketball, he lettered twice at Topeka High, and was on Washburn's varsity team all four of his college years. At both schools, Gordon was captain of the basketball team his senior year. In his final season at Washburn (1950-51), he led the team in scoring with 319 points, and played a key role in helping the Ichabods secure the Central Intercollegiate Conference league championship. In baseball, he lettered twice at Topeka High and pitched a no-hitter to win the state baseball championship with the Trojans in 1947. He was on the Washburn squad the three years in which the school fielded a baseball team while he was a student. Gordon also was a member of two state championship American Legion baseball teams (1945 and 1946), as well as the pennant-winning Abilene Ikes of the Amateur Baseball League of America (1949). In 1950, he was named the MVP of the state semi-pro baseball tournament in Wichita after recording four tourney wins pitching for the Topeka Decker Oilers. Upon graduating from college, Gordon taught and coached in Topeka schools until 1968, when the family relocated to Tampa, Florida. He pursued a career in educational counseling and worked 23 years as the coordinator of undergraduate advising for the University of South Florida. Digital reproduction of the scrapbook was accomplished through a joint project sponsored by the Kansas Historical Society and the Shawnee County Baseball Hall of Fame.


Crane Hall Observatory, Washburn University,  Topeka, Kansas

Crane Hall Observatory, Washburn University, Topeka, Kansas
Date: Between 1901 and 1920
This black and white photograph shows the Warner and Swazey telescope, inside the Crane Hall Observatory, on the Washburn University Campus in Topeka, Kansas. The university purchased the refracting telescope, in 1901, after the instrument was on exhibit at the Paris Exposition. The telescope, with a length of 165 inches and a weight of 1,000 pounds, survived the 1966 tornado that destroyed a large section of the campus. Today, the telescope is housed on the roof of Stoffer Science Hall.


Cynthia Conklin Rogers

Cynthia Conklin Rogers
Date: 2000
A photograph of Cynthia Conklin Rogers, second from right, and Washburn University President Dr. Jerry Farley, far right, at an alumni event.


Daniel Moses Fisk

Daniel Moses Fisk
Creator: Colville, L.P.
Date: March 1910
This is a photograph of Dr. Daniel M. Fisk, pastor at the First Congregational Church in Topeka, Kansas, and professor of sociology at Washburn College.


Distinguished Service Award

Distinguished Service Award
Creator: Medallic Art Company
Date: 1973
Washburn Alumni Association Distinguished Service Medal awarded to Mamie Williams, an African American woman who taught in Topeka, Kansas, schools from 1918 to 1960. Born in South Carolina, Williams moved with her family to Topeka in 1899. She studied mathematics at Washburn College, where she was the only African-American in her class. Williams began teaching in the Topeka area in 1918 and remained there for 42 years. In 1973, she was awarded the Washburn University Distinguished Service Award. The Washburn Alumni Association awarded this medal to Williams in recognition of her contributions to education. The Medallic Art Company of New York manufactured the medal. Founded in 1903, the company was well known for minting prestigious awards such as the Pulitzer Prize, the Peabody Award, and the Newberry Medal.


Dwight H. and Luther H. Platt correspondence

Dwight H. and Luther H. Platt correspondence
Date: 1863-1896
This is correspondence of Luther H. Platt and Dwight Henry Platt, missionary son and grandson of Jireh Platt, an abolitionist from Mendon, Illinois. Luther Platt's papers include letters from his wife Nettie, correspondence with religious groups, and correspondence with military officials in the South after the Civil War particularly regarding individuals still being held as slaves. The papers of Dwight Henry Platt include letters to his parents (Luther and Nettie) while he was at Washburn College in Topeka, Kansas, in the early 1880s; letters from friends; and correspondence from other individuals for business and professional purposes. Dwight served as pastor for the Congregational church in northwest Kansas, centered in Goodland.


Edgar B. Morehouse, World War I soldier

Edgar B. Morehouse, World War I soldier
Creator: Morehouse, Edgar B.
Date: 1917-1919
Around 1919, the Kansas State Historical Society and the American Legion solicited biographical information from returning veterans (primarily members of the 35th and 89th infantry divisions) and the families of those who died in service, notably from the Gold Star Mothers. Each veteran or family member was asked to provide letters, photographs, a biography, and military records. This file contains information on Edgar B. Morehouse, Battery A, Headquarters Co., 130th Field Artillery, 35th Division. Edgar is the nephew of George P. Morehouse, Co. B, 9th Battalion, Kansas State Guard. Edgar was a student at Washburn University, Topeka, Kansas, before joining the military.


Edward Ray Sloan receiving a honorary doctorate of law at Washburn University

Edward Ray Sloan receiving a honorary doctorate of law at Washburn University
Creator: Wolfe's Camera and Photo Shop
Date: Between 1950 and 1959
This is a photograph of Edward R. Sloan receiving a honorary doctorate of law at Washburn University. Dean Sellen is adjusting the hood and Dr. Stauffer, President of Washburn University is presenting the certificate. Sloan was born in 1883 in Seward County Nebraska. His family came to Kansas in 1886 locating in Sheridan County. Sloan graduated from Campbell College School of Law at Holton in 1904 and Washburn College Law School in 1905. He was elected county attorney of Sheridan County in the fall of 1904 and was re-elected twice while maintaining a private practice in Hoxie, Kansas. In July 1911, Sloan established with Guy L. Hursh the Holton law firm of Hursh & Sloan. In April 1912, Sloan was appointed Holton's city attorney, a position he held for 19 years. In 1930, Sloan helped establish the Topeka firm of Sloan, Hamilton and Sloan, which included his younger brother Floyd and W. Glenn Hamilton. It was the predecessor of the firm Sloan, Listrom, Eisenbarth, Sloan & Glassman. He served three terms in the Kansas House of Representatives from 1923 to 1929. In March 1931, he was appointed by Governor Woodring to fill a vacancy on the Kansas Supreme Court. Judge Sloan served the remaining 21 months of the term but opted not to seek election for another term. Later, he was appointed to the Kansas Corporation Commission and served as chairman from 1936 to 1938. In 1947, he was appointed Referee in Bankruptcy for the District of Kansas, where he served for 14 years. He was a lecturer at Washburn University Law School and compiled a textbook on bankruptcy.


Harvey Dwight Rice

Harvey Dwight Rice
Date: Between 1880 and 1890
This black and white photograph shows an illustration of Harvey Dwight Rice, (1821-1903), one of the founders of Washburn University in Topeka, Kansas. Rice came to the Kansas territory, in 1856, as a member of the Beecher Bible Company. He fought alongside Union forces at the Battle of the Blue and was involved in a few minor skirmishes during the war. In the early 1860s Rice and friend John Ritchie borrowed the money to purchase 160 acres of land in the central portion of the capital city. The site became the future home of Lincoln College, later renamed in 1868, Washburn College. He was instrumental in building the college from the ground up as he supervised the construction of the first building on the campus grounds. Rice was also appointed, in 1858, as a member of the original board of trustees. From 1901 to 1902, he served as president of the board. In 1902, Rice was recognized for his years of dedication and service to the college when the Science Hall, the first building built on the campus, was renamed Rice Hall. On June 11, 1903, Harvey Dwight Rice died at the age of eighty-two at his family farm east of the capital city.


Homecoming, Washburn University, Topeka, Kansas

Homecoming, Washburn University, Topeka, Kansas
Date: 1931
This is a photograph of the Phi Alpha Delta Fraternity house decorated for homecoming at Washburn College, Topeka, Kansas. There is a threshing machine with sheaves of wheat in the front yard, along with a depictions of a cemetery with graves and crosses.


Home of the President of Washburn University, Topeka, Kansas

Home of the President of Washburn University, Topeka, Kansas
Date: Between 1915 and 1920
This photo is a winter scene of the home of the President of Washburn University, Topeka, Kansas, which is located on the campus. At the time this photo was taken Dr. Parley P. Womer (1870-1957) was president.


John B. Dunbar

John B. Dunbar
Date: Between 1905 and 1910
This is a portrait of John B. Dunbar who was born at Bellevue, Nebraska, on April 3, 1841, where his parents were Presbyterian missionaries to the Pawnee Indians. He attended Hopkins Academy, Hadley, Massachusetts, and graduated from Amherst College in 1864. From 1869 to 1878, he was professor of Latin and Greek languages at Washburn College in Topeka, Kansas. In 1872-73, he assisted Father Gaillard of St. Mary's mission in the preparation of a Pottawatomie grammar and dictionary. Later he compiled a brief grammar and partial vocabulary of the Pawnee language, but it was never published. After leaving Topeka, Dunbar was connected with the public schools at Deposit and Brooklyn, New York, and Bloomfield, New Jersey.


John H. Outland

John H. Outland
Creator: Topeka Capital
Date: 1905
This is a photograph of Dr. John H. Outland, copied from Men of Kansas. Outland was born in Hesper, Kansas, later played college football and was twice named All American. After receiving his medical degree from the University of Pennsylvania, Outland returned to Kansas in 1900 where he set up his medical practice first in Lawrence, Kansas which led to his hiring as the head football coach of the University of Kansas for the 1901 season. He then moved his practice to Topeka, Kansas in 1904 in order to coach the Washburn University football team. In 1906 Outland moved his family to Kansas City, Kansas where he joined Trinity-Lutheran hospital in Kansas City, Missouri as a general practicing surgeon. While practicing medicine in the Kansas City region, Dr. Outland served for many years on the athletic board of the University of Kansas. He is the namesake of the Outland Trophy, an annual award established in 1946 and given to best interior lineman in college football. Outland was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a player in 2001.


John Ritchie

John Ritchie
This sepia colored carte-de-visite shows John Ritchie, (1817-1887), an abolitionist from Franklin, Indiana who moved, in 1855, to Topeka, Kansas. Actively involved in the Free State movement, Ritchie operated a way station along the underground railroad to help runway slaves. In 1858 and 1859 he respectively served as a delegate to the Leavenworth and Wyandotte Constitutional Conventions. Ritchie was also instrumental in donating a 160 acres of land for the future site of Washburn University in Topeka, Kansas.


Kansas - views in the city of Topeka, capital of the state

Kansas - views in the city of Topeka, capital of the state
Creator: Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper
Date: April 16, 1887
This is a two page spread from Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper showing 1. Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad General Offices; 2. view of Topeka from the City Park; 3. Topeka Free Library; 4. view looking down Kansas Avenue; 5. Post-Office; 6. Shops of the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad; 7. Proposed Capitol; 8. State Reform School; 9. Washburn College; and 10. Topeka in 1854.


Mary Bailey Sweet

Mary Bailey Sweet
Date: Between 1900 and 1919
This black and white photograph shows Mary Bailey Sweet benefactress of Washburn University in Topeka Kansas. The daughter of Timothy Bailey Sweet and Annie Brown Sweet she graduated from the College of Sisters of Bethany in Topeka and was valedictorian of the class of 1898. Mary attended Washburn College from 1900-1901, as a music student before graduating from the University of Kansas in 1903. After graduation, she taught at the Methodist Deaconess Training School in Chicago from 1903 to 1910 and later at the Methodist School for Girls in Rome, Italy from 1912 to 1914. During her stay in Italy Mary also worked with the Red Cross assisting with World War I efforts. At the close of the war, Mary returned to the United States to teach at the Methodist Deaconess school in Seattle, Washington where she taught for several years before returning to Topeka, Kansas. Mary became an active member of the community and to Washburn College. In 1952, Mary and her sisters Susie and Annie established the Sweet Foundation in memory of their brother Paul. The endowment provides scholarships to young men and women who attend Washburn. In 1955 Mary established the Sweet Summer Sabbatical Fund. With this endowment faculty at the university are given the opportunity to broaden their teaching experiences during the summer months through travel and research. Mary's commitment to education also extended into the community. She taught adult Sunday School classes at the First Methodist Church and was a member of numerous organizations including the Kansas Authors Club, and the Topeka Art Guild. Mary died on April 3, 1964 at the age of eighty-five.


Midsummer Nights Dream at Washburn University, Topeka, Kansas

Midsummer Nights Dream at Washburn University, Topeka, Kansas
Date: 1888
These Washburn University students are presenting the play "Midsummer Night's Dream."


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