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A brief history of Caleb and Rebecca Harvey, missionaries in the Quaker Shawnee Mission in 1858

A brief history of Caleb and Rebecca Harvey, missionaries in the Quaker Shawnee Mission in 1858
Creator: Duvall, Dorothy
Date: August 23, 1940
This item, written by Dorothy Duvall, the granddaughter of Caleb and Rebecca Harvey, provides a four-page history of the Harvey's missionary experiences at the Quaker Shawnee Mission. Duvall explains that the Harvey's went to the Shawnee Mission in 1858 after leaving Springfield, Ohio. According to Duvall, Caleb Harvey was an agricultural teacher, and Rebecca Harvey "taught the girls household duties of every sort and how to sew."


Administration Hall, Shawnee Indian Mission

Administration Hall, Shawnee Indian Mission
Creator: Kansas State Historical Society
Date: 1928-1939
This set of photographs represents the Main Building of the Mission that was used as the Administration Hall and the first Territorial Legislature of Kansas in 1855. In 1968, the Shawnee Indian Mission was declared a National Historic Landmark and has since been under the operation of the Kansas Historical Society.


Administration Hall, Shawnee Indian Mission

Administration Hall, Shawnee Indian Mission
Date: 1921-1939
This set of photographs represent different views of the East Building of the Mission. The East Buildling was used as the main and administrative building for the Mission as well as the first Territorial Legislature of Kansas in 1855. In 1968, the Shawnee Indian Mission was declared a National Historic Landmark and has since been under the operation of the Kansas Historical Society.


Annals of Shawnee Methodist Mission and Indian Manual Labor School

Annals of Shawnee Methodist Mission and Indian Manual Labor School
Creator: Caldwell, Martha B. (Martha Belle)
Date: 1939
These annals are a compilation of events concerning the Shawnee Methodist Mission year by year. The information was culled from a variety of sources. Most entries include a citation to the source. Thomas Johnson established the mission in 1830 near Turner in present Wyandotte County, Kansas. He also founded the Indian Manual Labor School, which operated in conjunction with the mission. It was moved to the Johnson County area in 1839 and the school operated until 1862. The Santa Fe and Oregon trails passed near the Johnson County location so travelers frequently stopped at the mission. The site housed the executive offices of the first territorial governor and the first territorial legislature met there. In addition to the Methodist mission, the Baptist and Quaker churches also operated missions for the Shawnee. These annals are the complete manuscript from which a condensed version was published by the Kansas State Historical Society in 1939.


Bark and Quillwork Container

Bark and Quillwork Container
Date: Unknown
This container was made by sewing layered strips of bark together. Porcupine quills were dyed and used to decorate the container. The bottom portion was decorated with a repeating cross and diamond pattern, most of which is now missing. The lid has the same pattern on the sides and the top is a red eight pointed star with a yellow center, edged in white cane. The container was first donated to the Kaw Mission, Council Grove, Kansas, and then to the Kansas Historical Society in 1980. It may have originated in northern Michigan. Kaw Mission was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971.


Bedroom for Johnson children, Shawnee Indian Mission

Bedroom for Johnson children, Shawnee Indian Mission
Creator: Wolfe Commercial Photo Service
Date: 1942
This photograph represents the bedroom belonging to the Johnson children in the North Building of the Shawnee Indian Mission after reconstruction in 1942. The furniture represented in the photograph is made of walnut. In 1968, the Shawnee Indian Mission was declared a National Historic Landmark and has since been under the operation of the Kansas Historical Society.


Belle R. Greene to George W. Martin

Belle R. Greene to George W. Martin
Creator: Greene, Belle R.
Date: March 28, 1907-April 3, 1907
In this correspondence with George W. Martin, Belle R. Greene, daughter of Jesse Greene, discusses the material covered in her father's papers from the period when he worked at the Shawnee Indian Methodist Manual Labor School. As Belle Greene indicates in her letters to G.W. Martin, her father's papers are full of details regarding the individuals he dealt with at the Methodist school.


Buttons from the Iowa and Sac and Fox Mission, 14DP384

Buttons from the Iowa and Sac and Fox Mission, 14DP384
Date: 1845-1905
These seven buttons were among the many that were recovered from an excavation at the Iowa Sac and Fox Mission in Doniphan County by Kansas Historical Society archeologists and Kansas Anthropological Association volunteers. The Presbyterian Mission was built in 1845 and closed in 1863. After that part of the building was razed, the rest was used as a residence until 1905. The State of Kansas acquired to property in 1941. Shown are a brass button front with a Greek Key pattern and two shell buttons, one with an inset center and the other a three-hole button in a floral shape. Additionally, there are four china buttons: two four-hole dish buttons (one with traces of purple coloring), a three-hole dish button and a two-hole Prosser button in two shades of brown.


Buttons from the Wea Mission, 14MM322

Buttons from the Wea Mission, 14MM322
Date: 1837-1857
These buttons were recovered from the Wea Presbyterian Mission in 1997 by Kansas Historical Society archeologists and crew. The excavations revealed foundations for the Mission house, a spring house, and an outbuilding in addition to a filled in well. The Wea Mission (1834-1837) changed functions over time: the Osage River Subagency (1837-1844), the Wea and Piankeshaw Baptist Mission (1844-1857) and other occupants until 1909 when the house burned. The three buttons are all 4-hole sew through buttons, one each of metal, wood, and rubber.


Cabin on Kaw Mission grounds, Council Grove, Kansas

Cabin on Kaw Mission grounds, Council Grove, Kansas
Date: Between 1880 and 1920
A photograph of a cabin on the Kaw Mission grounds in Council Grove, Kansas. Kaw Mission was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1971 and now operates as Kaw Mission State Historic Site.


Carey Mission letter, unknown author

Carey Mission letter, unknown author
Creator: Carey Missionaries
Date: February 19, 1828
In this letter from the Carey Mission (in Michigan Territory) the author details the expenditures accrued during the third quarter of 1827, part of which was a result of traveling expenses for four Native American students who left the Carey Mission for Worthington in Ohio.


Cast Iron Horse from the Shawnee Methodist Mission, 14JO362

Cast Iron Horse from the Shawnee Methodist Mission, 14JO362
Date: 1890-1934
This cast iron horse was recovered from excavations by Kansas Historical Society archeologists and crew at the Shawnee Indian Mission in Johnson County. The Mission was established in 1839 and operated as a school until 1854. It then passed into private ownership and served different functions until it was acquired by the state of Kansas in 1927. Cast iron toys, like this half of a horse, were usually mass produced. This toy was cleaned by electrolysis which passes an electrical current through a liquid solution to separate the rust from the artifact.


Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, St. Marys, Kansas

Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, St. Marys, Kansas
Date: Between 1870 and 1890
View of the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception in St. Marys, in Pottawatomie County, Kansas. This was the first Catholic cathedral built west of the Missouri River.


Catholic Church at Osage Mission, St. Paul, Kansas

Catholic Church at Osage Mission, St. Paul, Kansas
Date: Between 1865 and 1875
A photograph of the Catholic Osage Mission established in Neosho County, Kansas. The center part of the building was erected in 1847.


Clara Gowing reminiscence

Clara Gowing reminiscence
Creator: Gowing, Clara
Date: 1908
A series of letters written by Clara Gowing describing Gowing's experiences such as her "Early Mission life among the Indians of the west," "Miss Elisabeth S. Morse," "An Indian Payment," "Indian Traditions," "A Wedding Among the Indians," and "Mission School Among the Indians."


Coins from the Iowa and Sac and Fox Mission, 14DP384

Coins from the Iowa and Sac and Fox Mission, 14DP384
Date: 1854-1864
Shown are two coins that were recovered from the excavations at the Iowa and Sac and Fox Mission in Doniphan County by Kansas Historical Society archeologists and Kansas Anthropological Association volunteers. The Presbyterian Mission was built in 1845 and closed in 1863. After that, part of the building was razed, the rest was used as a residence until 1905. The State of Kansas acquired to property in 1941. The 1854 half dime shows a seated Liberty, 13 stars, and an arrow on each side of the year on the obverse side. The arrows indicate that that the coin weight had been reduced. The reverse of the half dime shows the face value of the coin, a wreath, and the words "UNITED STATES of AMERICA." The 2¢ coin's obverse side shows a shield with "IN GOD WE TRUST" on the banner and the mint date of 1864. The reverse side is too corroded to discern what was present.


Colonial Dames room, Shawnee Indian Mission

Colonial Dames room, Shawnee Indian Mission
Creator: Wolfe Commercial Photo Service
Date: 1954-1956
This photograph represents the Colonial Dame room at the Shawnee Indian Mission in Fairway, Kansas. In 1968, the Shawnee Indian Mission was declared a National Historic Landmark and has since been under the operation of the Kansas Historical Society.


Colonial Dames room, Shawnee Indian Mission

Colonial Dames room, Shawnee Indian Mission
Creator: Wolfe Commercial Photo Service
Date: 1954-1956
This photograph represents the Colonial Dames room at the Shawnee Indian Mission in Fairway, Kansas. In 1968, the Shawnee Indian Mission was declared a National Historic Landmark and has since been under the operation of the Kansas Historical Society.


Cone Tinkler from the Wea Presbyterian Mission, 14MM322

Cone Tinkler from the Wea Presbyterian Mission, 14MM322
Date: 1837-1857
This cone tinkler was recovered from the Wea Presbyterian Mission in 1997 by Kansas Historical Society archeologists and crew. The excavations revealed foundations for the Mission house, a spring house, and an outbuilding in addition to a filled in well. The Wea Mission (1834-1837) changed functions over time: the Osage River Subagency (1837-1844), the Wea and Piankeshaw Baptist Mission (1844-1857) and other occupants until 1909 when the house burned. Tinklers were used to decorate hair, clothes and other objects.


Crossing the Plains, the journal of Harriett Bidwell Shaw

Crossing the Plains, the journal of Harriett Bidwell Shaw
Creator: Shaw, Harriet Bidwell
Date: 1851
Harriett Bidwell Shaw started a journal in September 18,1851, when she and her husband, Reverend James Milton Shaw traveled in a wagon train via the Santa Fe Trail to New Mexico. Harriett was the only woman to accompany the wagon train. She documented their daily activities, the weather conditions, hardships on the trail, encounters with Indians, and buffalo hunting. When the Shaws passed through Kansas they stayed at Shawnee Baptist Mission, Council Grove, and Pawnee Rock and stopped near Fort Mackey on the Arkansas river. They reached Santa Fe on November 14, 1851, where the journal ends. The Shaws eventually went to Albuquerque and then Socorro to establish Baptist missions among the Spanish people. In sum, Shaws journal presents a remarkable picture of the difficulties and rewards of travel to the American West prior to the American Civil War.


Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday
Creator: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: February 11, 1855
Cyrus K. Holliday wrote to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, where he had stopped on his way to visit Governor Andrew H. Reeder at the Shawnee Indian Mission. Holliday hoped to make the growing Topeka the capital of Kansas Territory. In Lawrence, a hotel keeper had died and George W. Brown, editor of the Herald of Freedom, was ill. Despite mail-delaying winter storms further east, the weather continued mildly. Holliday described his financial investments and requested money for his trip to Meadville, more urgent as the birth of their first child approached.


Daily journal of Elisabeth S. Morse, teacher at Delaware Baptist Mission

Daily journal of Elisabeth S. Morse, teacher at Delaware Baptist Mission
Creator: Morse, Elizabeth Stevens
Date: February 13, 1866-July 14, 1866
This item is the 1866 daily journal for Elisabeth S. Morse who taught at the Delaware Baptist Mission near Edwardsville, Kansas. While a number of entries are fairly brief, the journal contains interesting information on Morse's daily activities at the Mission.


Dance Regalia Ornament from the Kaw Mission, 14MO368

Dance Regalia Ornament from the Kaw Mission, 14MO368
Date: 1996-2014
This dance regalia ornament was recovered during excavations at the 2018 Kansas Archeology Training Program field school at the Kaw Mission. The ornament has a large brass concho, two leather fringes, two tinkler or jingle cones and beads of mixed styles in black, orange and tan. Ornaments such as this one enhance dance regalia and are often used for powwow dancing. Pow wows and dancing have been held in Council Grove during Washunga Days, a community festival celebrating the Kaw Indians, friends, family and community, since 1983. Dancing was held at the Kaw Mission from 1996 to 2014. The Kaw Mission State Historic Site was built over the winter of 1850 - 1851 by the Methodist Episcopal Church South as a school for boys in the Kaw (or Kansa) tribe. The site was acquired by the state of Kansas in 1951 and listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1971.


Dishes from the Iowa and Sac and Fox Mission, 14DP384

Dishes from the Iowa and Sac and Fox Mission, 14DP384
Date: 1845-1905
These six dish sherds were recovered from excavation at the Iowa Sac and Fox Mission in Doniphan County. The sherds represent six different plates or cups and are either decorated by hand painting or by transfer printing. They depict floral and landscape motifs. The Presbyterian Mission was built in 1845 and closed in 1863. After that part of the building was razed, the rest was used as a residence until 1905. The State of Kansas acquired to property in 1941.


Dishes from the Wea Mission, 14MM322

Dishes from the Wea Mission, 14MM322
Date: 1837-1857
These dish sherds were recovered from the Wea Presbyterian Mission in 1997 by Kansas Historical Society archeologists and crew. Though the dish sherds are often quite small, a wide variety of patterns were recovered from the site including dish sherds with molded patterns, patterns created by transfer printing, called transferware, and by sponging with color, called spongeware. The excavations revealed foundations for the Mission house, a spring house, and an outbuilding in addition to a filled in well. The Wea Mission (1834-1837) changed functions over time: the Osage River Subagency (1837-1844), the Wea and Piankeshaw Baptist Mission (1844-1857) and other occupants until 1909 when the house burned.


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