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Haskell County district court session in Santa Fe, Kansas

Haskell County district court session in Santa Fe, Kansas
Creator: Steele, F. M. (Francis Marion), 1866-1936
Date: November, 1912
This is an interior view of people attending a session of the Haskell County district court in Santa Fe, Kansas. This image was obtained from a 1930 edition of the Sublette Monitor. The people are identified from left to right (top row) as: William Weider Lucus, sheriff; Myrtle Rice, court reporter; Judge William Howard Thompson; Albert Jasper, clerk of the district court and a Christian preacher; Clarence Glenn Dennis, county attorney and a lawyer in Sublette; (second row) T. W. Marshall, lawyer from New Ulysses; John Jacob Miller, pioneer publisher of The Sublette (then the Santa Fe) Monitor; an unidentified lawyer; Herbert White Stubbs, a lawyer from Ulysses; Henry Oscar Trinkle, lawyer from Garden City; Herbert Rhoades, lawyer from New Ulysses and later Nebraska; Charles E. Vance, a lawyer from Garden City; Albert Watkins, a lawyer from Dodge City; Arlon B. Crum, a lawyer from Lyndon, KS; Richard Joseph Hopkins, later a federal judge; Edgar Foster, a lawyer from Garden City; John Mars, a lawyer from Santa Fe; Lewis Antrim Madison, a lawyer from Dodge City, and Ralph Wallace, a Satanta merchant.


Haskell County organization records

Haskell County organization records
Creator: Kansas. Secretary of State
Date: 1887-1888
In order for an unorganized county to be recognized by the state of Kansas, a certain number of householders/legal electors had to petition the governor. The governor would appoint a census taker. Initially, unorganized counties were required to document that they had at least 600 inhabitants in order to be recognized as a county by the state legislature. Over time the number of residents needed to organize a county changed to 1500 and later to 2500 residents. The census was submitted to the governor who then issued a proclamation indicating that the requirements had been met, appointing county commissioners and a county clerk, and naming a county seat. Not all of these documents are available for each county. Included in this file is a proclamation from the governor asking for a census to be taken for Haskell County as well as a proclamation appointing county officers and designating Santa Fe as the temporary county seat.


Horse sale, Santa Fe, Haskell County, Kansas

Horse sale, Santa Fe, Haskell County, Kansas
Creator: Steele, F. M. (Francis Marion), 1866-1936
Date: Between 1891 and 1912
There was brisk trading in Santa Fe, Kansas, whenever a herd of sleek horses like these were offered for sale, as the pioneers were unaccustomed to the benefits of motorized farming, and even motor cars were a rarity. John Jacob Miller is shown facing the camera (sixth man from the right, dressed in a hat, tie, white shirt, and vest). Also visible in the photograph are the Haskell County courthouse, Cave's Store, and Frank McCoy Lands. Santa Fe was the first county seat of Haskell County, Kansas. In 1912, the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe railroad built a line from Dodge City, Kansas, to Elkhart, Texas, that bypassed the town by seven miles. In 1920, the Haskell Country seat was moved to Sublette, which had prospered by being on the AT&SF rail line, and Santa Fe faded away into a ghost town.


John Jacob Miller home and underground water line, Santa Fe, Kansas

John Jacob Miller home and underground water line, Santa Fe, Kansas
Creator: Steele, F. M. (Francis Marion), 1866-1936
Date: Between 1891 and 1912
This is a view of John Jacob Miller's farmhouse and farm buildings in Santa Fe, Haskell County, Kansas. Also visible are a woman, three men, a black dog, and an underground water line fed from a large reservoir.


Moving S.E. Cave's office building from Santa Fe to Sublette, Kansas

Moving S.E. Cave's office building from Santa Fe to Sublette, Kansas
Creator: Steele, F. M. (Francis Marion), 1866-1936
Date: Between 1891 and 1912
This is a view of workers using wagons and mules to move S. E. Cave's office building from Santa Fe, Kansas, to the new Haskell County seat in Sublette, Kansas. The James S. Patrick Real Estate office, left, was later moved to Satanta, Kansas. In the background, behind the S. E. Cave building, is the original Haskell County Courthouse building. Santa Fe pioneers fought hard for a railroad for Haskell County, but when it came in 1913, it missed Santa Fe, the original county seat, by seven miles. In 1920, the county seat was moved to Sublette, Kansas, which had prospered by being on the Santa Fe railroad line, and Santa Fe faded away into a ghost town.


Presbyterian/Dunkard church in Santa Fe, Kansas

Presbyterian/Dunkard church in Santa Fe, Kansas
Creator: Steele, F. M. (Francis Marion), 1866-1936
Date: Between 1891 and 1912
This is a view of the Presbyterian/Dunkard church in Santa Fe, Haskell County, Kansas. It was later moved north to Plymell, in Finney County, and additions were added.


The Industrial Handbook Embracing A Concise Statement  Of The Nature, Cause And Effects Of Existing Industrial Ills:  With A Practical Method of Relief

The Industrial Handbook Embracing A Concise Statement Of The Nature, Cause And Effects Of Existing Industrial Ills: With A Practical Method of Relief
Creator: Marshall, William Vickery
Date: 1890
This pamphlet is titled Cumulative Tax on the cover and "Aids to the study of the cumulative tax" is on the title page. An additional title is The Industrial Handbook Embracing a Concise Statement of the Nature, Cause and Effects of Existing Industrial Ills; with a Practical Method of Relief. Mr. Marshall believed that the cumulative tax would be a way to correct the concentration of wealth in the hands of a few in the United States. This was one of the ills the Populist Movement wanted to correct. Mr. Marshall lived in Santa Fe, Kansas, at the time this pamphlet was published. It appears to be a reprint or revision of a pamphlet called the Industrial Handbook published in 1888. The printer was H. & I Vincent, printers, Winfield, Kansas.


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