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Winter 1977, Volume 43, Number 4

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Aerial view of the early Menninger Clinic Children's Division in Topeka, Kansas Aerial view of the early Menninger Clinic Children's Division in Topeka, Kansas

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Kansas Memory has been created by the Kansas State Historical Society to share its historical collections via the Internet. Read more.

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A. L. Coleman to Governor John St. John

A. L. Coleman to Governor John St. John
Creator: Coleman, A. L.
Date: August 10, 1880
In this letter, Kansas Governor St. John is requested to attend a "Grand rally" in Sabetha, Kansas, in order to "fully settle the Prohibition matter" in Northern Kansas. It is on letterhead for Sargent & Coleman, Law, Loan, Real Estate, Collecting, Insurance, and Tax-Paying Agency. The company was established in 1857.


A. L. Coleman to Governor John St. John

A. L. Coleman to Governor John St. John
Creator: Coleman, A. L.
Date: September 10, 1880
In this letter, attorney A.L. Coleman of Sabetha, offers belated congratulations to Kansas Governor St. John on his nomination, pledging his support for prohibition. The letterhead is for Sargent & Coleman: Law, Loan, Real Estate, Collecting.


C. T. Whittenhall to Governor John St. John

C. T. Whittenhall to Governor John St. John
Creator: Whittenhall, C. T.
Date: June 04, 1879
Complaining that his community of Sabetha, Kansas, is "cursed" with two saloons and whiskey petitions of questionable legality, C. T. Whittenhall requests from Kansas Governor St. John to send documents referencing the temperance amendments, which are to be introduced in the fall.


Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad depot Sabetha, Kansas

Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad depot Sabetha, Kansas
Creator: Killam, H.
Date: Between 1950 and 1966
These two photographs show the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad depot in Sabetha, Kansas. The station was located on the Western Division, Sub Division 6-A at mile post 64.5.


Crazy quilt

Crazy quilt
Date: between 1880 and 1910
Crazy Quilt featuring many irregularly shaped pieces of silk stitched to a foundation fabric. Pieces are outlined in a variety of embroidery stitches worked in cotton thread. Backing is blue/tan plaid silk. Binding is same plaid silk on two opposing edges, while remaining edges are trimmed in fringed braid. Quilt has been tied with narrow silk ribbon visible only on backing. This quilt is from the home of the Edmond F. Pugsley family of Sabetha, Kansas. The Pugsleys came to Kansas from New York sometime around 1870, settling in the town of Albany, Kansas before eventually moving to Sabetha. They had two daughters, Bessie and Lucy; the latter was a dressmaker.


Edwin Knowles to Governor John St. John

Edwin Knowles to Governor John St. John
Creator: Knowles, Edwin
Date: May 25, 1880
This letter to Kansas Governor St. John from Edwin Knowles invites St. John to speak at a mass temperance meeting on July 3rd in Sabetha. Knowles pledges his support for St. John's nomination. The letter is written on stationery for the Sabetha State Bank. Knowles was the cashier. The letterhead indicates that Willis Brown was the president.


Emma Grimm to Arthur Capper

Emma Grimm to Arthur Capper
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1915-1919: Capper)
Date: November 27, 1917
Emma Grimm of Sabetha, Nemaha County, wrote this letter to Governor Arthur Capper regarding the child labor law that prohibits the employment of children under the age of 14 in any mercantile establishment. Grimm believes that if children do not learn the value of work at a young age, "then they get stubern and want there own way and that does not work good." Her son Theodore had recently been let go from his job as a grocery delivery boy, which apparently upset him greatly. Theodore was mentioned by name in a letter by another Sabetha citizen, Ralph Tennal, dated December 2, 1917, and in Commissioner P.J. McBride's letter, dated December 8, 1917.


Governor's proclamations

Governor's proclamations
Date: 1869-1977
This collection of proclamations issued by Kansas Governors declares first, second or third-class status for Kansas towns and cities. Proclamations are arranged in alphabetical order by town name. Included are descriptions of city limits, plat maps and censuses.


Helen May Butler and Her Ladies Brass Band

Helen May Butler and Her Ladies Brass Band
Date: 1909
This is a photo of Helen May Butler and Her Ladies Brass Band with their instruments at a Chautauqua in Sabetha, Kansas. The title above is what is on the bass drum. There is one woman dressed in Native American attire and she may be Native American.


Kansas Film Commission site photographs, towns Oakley - Syracuse

Kansas Film Commission site photographs, towns Oakley - Syracuse
Creator: Kansas Film Commission
Date: 1988-2002
These are panoramic photographs of Kansas towns beginning with Leavenworth and ending with Norway. The Kansas Film Commission created the photos to promote Kansas locations to film companies. Many of the photographs show business districts and buildings. The panoramics were created by taking individual photos and taping them together. Towns and cities included in this part of the collection are: Oakley, Oberlin, Olathe,Olsburg, Osage City, Osawatomie, Ottawa, Overbrook, Palco, Palmer, Paola, Pawnee Rock, Paxico, Peabody, Penalosa, Penokee, Perry, Peru, Pfeifer, Plainville, Plevna, Potwin, Pratt, Pretty Prairie, Quenemo,Quinter, Ramona, Ransom, Raymond, Reading, Redwing, Republic, Rexford, Robinson, Roeland Park, Rolla, Rossville, Sabetha, Salina, Satanta, Scammon, Scranton, Sedan, Selden, Severy, Severance, Silver Lake, Smileyberg, Smolan, Soldier, Solomon, Sparks, Stafford County (Hudson), Sterling, St. Francis, St. George, St. Marys, St. Peter, Studley, Sun City, and Syracuse. Photos of courthouses are included for several communities. Some of the photos of communities show churches, grain elevators, water towers, parks, public/government buildings, railroad depots and tracks, and residences. There are aerial photographs for Ottawa, Paola, and Paxico.


P. J. McBride to Arthur Capper

P. J. McBride to Arthur Capper
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1915-1919: Capper)
Date: December 12, 1917
This letter by P. J. McBride, Commissioner of Labor and Industry, informed the governor of Kansas about the enforcement of child labor laws in Sabetha, Nemaha County. Edith Enderton, an agent of the Department of Labor and Industry, had visited Sabetha in order to enforce compliance with the child labor law, and she found "a considerable number of children employed in violation" of this law. McBride specifically mentions a 10-year old boy, Teddy Grimm, who delivered groceries and sometimes worked 14 or 15 hours lifting heavy boxes and sacks of flour. While McBride acknowledges that Enderton may "have possibly been a little over-zealous in the application of the law where children are employed by their own parents"?which was not the case with Teddy Grimm?McBride agrees that young children should not be required to work outside the home.


P. J. McBride to Emma Grimm

P. J. McBride to Emma Grimm
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1929-1931 : Reed)
Date: December 12, 1917
In this letter P. J. McBride, the commissioner of labor and industry, responds to Emma Grimm's letter to Governor Arthur Capper dated November 27, 1917. Grimm had expressed her displeasure with the enforcement of the child labor law in her hometown of Sabetha, which had forced her 10-year old son Theodore to leave his job as a grocery delivery boy. McBride informed her that, because the Legislature passed this law, the governor could not make any exceptions. McBride also emphasized that "play and recreation" were an important element in children's development and that after schoolwork and household chores had been completed, children should have unstructured time to play. McBride refers to the 1917 amendment to the Industrial Welfare Act of 1915; this amendment prohibited work at night or for more than 8 hours daily or 48 hours weekly and required that school superintendents issue work permits to eligible students prior to the students' employment. Also, children could not be employed until they had completed elementary school.


P. J. McBride to Ralph Tennal

P. J. McBride to Ralph Tennal
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1915-1919: Capper)
Date: December 8, 1917
This letter was written in response to Ralph Tennal's earlier letter (dated December 2) to Gov. Arthur Capper, which had been referred to P. J. McBride, the Commissioner of Labor and Industry. In it, McBride responds to Tennal's concerns that the child labor law prevented children from learning the value of hard work. McBride politely states that the state legislature enacted this law, and thus complaints should be directed to the legislators. While he concurs with Tennal's assertion that children who are bored can get into mischief, McBride argues that "the solution to this problem is the proper control and direction of play and recreation of our children by parents and public welfare officials rather than by putting them at work in our industries." Consequently, child labor laws not only prevented abuses, but they also allowed children the free time deemed necessary for their development, as well as ensuring that these girls and boys receive a solid education. In closing, McBride encourages Tennal to rethink his position and help ensure compliance with these laws. Tennal had also written a letter about this issue on November 22, 1917.


P. J. McBride to Roy Hennigh

P. J. McBride to Roy Hennigh
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1915-1919: Capper)
Date: December 12, 1917
This letter was written in response to Roy Hennigh's earlier letter (dated November 21) to Gov. Arthur Capper, which had been referred to P. J. McBride, the Commissioner of Labor and Industry. In it, McBride responds to Hennigh's complaint that a welfare inspector prevented Hennigh from employing his two daughters in his grocery store. McBride referred him to the child labor law that "prohibited the employment of any child under 14 years of age in mercantile establishments." No one could make any exception to this law because, according to McBride, some of the worst cases of abuse had occurred at the hands of parents. This law did not affect children's work within the home, but it did mandate that children under 14 could not be assigned regular duties for a specific period of time in a place of business. McBride emphasized that "it is not the purpose of this department to split hairs," but that his inspectors were bound to ensure that the law was applied fairly and equally to all.


Penalties for Drunkeness

Penalties for Drunkeness
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1915-1919: Capper)
Date: 1915
This file includes two postcards and a letter from Sabetha, Kansas proposing more severe punishments for persons purchasing liquor. This is part of a bigger collection of Governor Arthur Capper correspondence.


Plat book of Nemaha County, Kansas

Plat book of Nemaha County, Kansas
Creator: Stinson, A. R.
Date: 1908
This atlas shows maps of each township with the names of landowners. It has a patrons' directory, and plats of towns as of the year of publication.


Ralph Tennal to Arthur Capper

Ralph Tennal to Arthur Capper
Creator: Tennal, Ralph
Date: November 22, 1917
Ralph Tennal, editor of the Sabetha Herald, wrote this letter to the governor complaining about a recent visit from an inspector who had ordered local merchants to comply with child labor laws. Tennal refers specifically to children who helped run their parents stores on weekends and after school. Tennal believes that "the orders strike me as being out of line with horse sense and out of line with the spirit of the government." He firmly believed that hard work would be of great value to these children. In 1917 the Industrial Welfare Act of 1915 was amended to include these restrictions on child labor: children could not work at night or for more than 8 hours daily or 48 hours weekly, school superintendents were responsible for issuing work permits, and children could not work until they had completed elementary school.


Ralph Tennal to Arthur Capper

Ralph Tennal to Arthur Capper
Creator: Tennal, Ralph
Date: December 2, 1917
Ralph Tennal, editor of the Sabetha Herald, wrote this letter to the governor in an attempt to convince Capper that child labor laws did more trouble than good. Tennal believes that these laws prevented children from being industrious and led to crime, because "everybody knows what Satan does to idle hands." Instead of having children run loose, they should find suitable employment on weekends and evenings that would give them "wholesome activities." According to Tennal, these child labor laws were doing more harm than good.


Roy Hennigh to Arthur Capper

Roy Hennigh to Arthur Capper
Creator: Hennigh, Roy
Date: November 21, 1917
Roy Hennigh, owner of a grocery store in Sabetha, Nemaha County, wrote this letter to the governor concerning a recent visit to his store by a female deputy factory inspector. According to Hennigh, this inspector informed him that his two teenage daughters could not work in his store on the weekends according to the child labor laws. Hennigh argues that he does not officially employ his children, or any other children, because "they help me just as anybody's children should." He believes it is "very poor judgement to enact a law which forbids parents to use the help of their own children." He also takes issue with the fact that a female inspector evaluated his business. P. J. McBride, Commissioner of Labor and Industry, replied to this letter on December 12, 1917.


St. Joseph & Grand Island Railway depot, Sabetha, Kansas

St. Joseph & Grand Island Railway depot, Sabetha, Kansas
Date: 1911
This postcard shows a group of people waiting to board a doodlebug, a gasoline-powered engine, in front of the St. Joseph & Grand Island Railway depot in Sabetha, Kansas.


Union Pacific Railroad Company depot, Sabetha, Kansas

Union Pacific Railroad Company depot, Sabetha, Kansas
Date: Between 1960 and 1969
This photograph shows the Union Pacific Railroad Company depot in Sabetha, Kansas. The wooden structure no longer stands.


William Logan Carlyle, World War I soldier

William Logan Carlyle, World War I soldier
Date: 1919
Around 1919, the Kansas State Historical Society and the American Legion solicited biographical information from returning veterans (primarily members of the 35th and 89th infantry divisions) and the families of those who died in service, notably from the Gold Star Mothers. Each veteran or family member was asked to provide letters, photographs, a biography, and military records. This file contains information on William Logan Carlyle, Base Hospital, Ft. Riley.


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