Kansas MemoryKansas Memory

Kansas Historical SocietyKansas Historical Society

-

Log In

Username:

Password:

After login, go to:

Register
Forgot Username?
Forgot Password?

Browse Users
Contact us

-

Martha Farnsworth

-

Podcast Archive

Governor Mike Hayden Interview
Details
Listen Now
Subscribe - iTunesSubscribe - RSS

More podcasts

-

Popular Item

Winter 1977, Volume 43, Number 4

-

Random Item

Lincoln Grade School Lincoln Grade School

-

Site Statistics

Total images: 609,363
Bookbag items: 36,934
Registered users: 11,187

-

About

Kansas Memory has been created by the Kansas State Historical Society to share its historical collections via the Internet. Read more.

-

Syndication

Matching items: 5

Category Filters

Places - Cities and towns - Rose Hill

Search within these results


       

Search Tips

Start Over | RSS Feed RSS Feed

View: Image Only | Title Only | Detailed
Sort by: TitleSort by Title, Ascending | Date | Creator | Newest

Showing 1 - 5 of 5 (results per page: 10 | 25 | 50)


Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company depot, Rose Hill, Kansas

Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company depot, Rose Hill, Kansas
Creator: Killam, H.
Date: September 21, 1965
This photograph shows the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company depot at Rose Hill, Kansas. The depot was located on the Eastern Lines, Middle Division, Fourth district, mile post 211.6.


Dymaxion House, Rose Hill, Kansas

Dymaxion House, Rose Hill, Kansas
Date: Between 1948 and 1958
This black and white photograph shows the prototype of a Dymaxion House designed by Richard Buckminster Fuller. The word Dymaxion means DY (dynamic), MAX (maximum), and ION (tension). The house, constructed in Rose Hill, KS, was made of aluminum and used tension suspension from a central column or mast. This model was one of only two prototypes ever produced. Fuller hoped to convert the Beech aircraft factory in Wichita to produce these houses to give returning veterans jobs and to help resolve the shortage of homes following World War II. In 1991 the William Graham family donated it to the Henry Ford Museum & Greenfield Village in Dearborn, Michigan.


Dymaxion house, Rose Hill, Kansas

Dymaxion house, Rose Hill, Kansas
Date: Between 1948 and 1958
This black and white photograph shows the prototype of a dymaxion house designed by Richard Buckminster Fuller. The word dymaxion means DY (dynamic), MAX (maximum), and ION (tension). The house, constructed in Rose Hill, Kansas, was made of aluminum and used tension suspension from a central column or mast. This model was one of only two prototypes ever produced. Fuller hoped to convert the Beech aircraft factory in Wichita to produce these houses to give returning veterans jobs and to help resolve the shortage of homes following World War II. In 1991 the William Graham family donated it to the Henry Ford Museum & Greenfield Village in Dearborn Michigan.


Dymaxion house, Rose Hill, Kansas

Dymaxion house, Rose Hill, Kansas
Date: Between 1948 and 1958
This black and white photograph shows the prototype of a dymaxion house designed by Richard Buckminster Fuller. The word Dymaxion means DY (dynamic), MAX (maximum), and ION (tension). The house, constructed in Rose Hill, Kansas, was made of aluminum and used tension suspension from a central column or mast. This model was one of only two prototypes ever produced. Fuller hoped to convert the Beech aircraft factory in Wichta to produce these houses to give returning veterans jobs and to help resolve the shortage of homes following World War II. In 1991 the William Graham family donated it to the Henry Ford Museum & Greenfield Village in Dearborn, Michigan.


Standard atlas of Butler County, Kansas

Standard atlas of Butler County, Kansas
Creator: Geo. A. Ogle & Co.
Date: 1905
This atlas shows maps of each township with the names of landowners. It has a patrons' directory, and plats of towns as of the year of publication.


Showing 1 - 5

Copyright © 2007-2019 - Kansas Historical Society - Contact Us
This website was developed in part with funding provided by the Information Network of Kansas.