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8,000 students affected, state officials see no trouble adjusting schools to new rule

8,000 students affected, state officials see no trouble adjusting schools to new rule
Creator: Topeka Journal
Date: May 17, 1954
This article discusses how the state of Kansas will work to conform to the ruling made in the Brown v. Board of Education decision on May 17, 1954. The U.S. Supreme Court had ruled that the segregation of schools based on race was unconstitutional. Many cities in Kansas, including Topeka, Atchison, Salina, Wichita, and Pittsburg were already working to integrate their schools. Topeka had an estimated 625 African American students who would be affected by the court's ruling, and the article lists the numbers for other cities and towns in the state.


Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company depot, Olathe, Kansas

Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company depot, Olathe, Kansas
Date: Between 1950 and 1959
This photograph shows the one-story brick building of the Eastern Lines and Eastern Division of the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company depot at Olathe, Kansas.


Beads from the Mahaffie Farmstead and Stagecoach Stop

Beads from the Mahaffie Farmstead and Stagecoach Stop
Date: 1858-1886
These two beads were recovered at excavations in 1988 during a joint venture between Kansas Historical Society archeologists, Kansas Anthropological Association volunteers, and the City of Olathe. Both beads are oblong and red, but the darker red bead may be manufactured of wood, while the brighter red bead may be of glass. It is difficult to tell the materials without harming the bead. The site consisted of the residence and out buildings built by James and Lucinda Mahaffie in 1858. The farmstead later served as a stagecoach stop on the Santa Fe trail.


Beer Bottle from the Mahaffie Farmstead and Stagecoach Stop, 14JO356

Beer Bottle from the Mahaffie Farmstead and Stagecoach Stop, 14JO356
Date: 1858-1886
This brown glass bottle has the typical neck of a beer bottle, but is much shortened in the body. The bottle has what is called a blob style finish at the rim. It was recovered during excavations in 1988 during a joint venture between Kansas Historical Society archeologists, Kansas Anthropological Association volunteers, and the City of Olathe. The site, 14JO356, consisted of the residence and out buildings built by James and Lucinda Mahaffie in 1858. The farmstead later served as a stagecoach stop on the Santa Fe trail.


Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks' baseball team in Olathe, Kansas

Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks' baseball team in Olathe, Kansas
Date: 1907
This is a photograph of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks' baseball team in Olathe, Kansas. People in the photograph are identified as: (standing) Mat Churchill (umpire), ____ Reed, _____Ounaway, _____ Allread, ______ Allread, second row _____ Luvirmore, C. L. Tew, Herman Elwell, _____ Bedell, and seated Duch Baker, _____ Snyder, _____ Hill _____Ranfro, and Dean Elwell.


Brass Bracelet from the Mahaffie Farmstead and Stagecoach Stop, 14JO356

Brass Bracelet from the Mahaffie Farmstead and Stagecoach Stop, 14JO356
Date: 1858-1886
The brass fragments shown here came from a single bracelet that was recovered during excavations in 1988 during a joint venture between Kansas Historical Society archeologists, Kansas Anthropological Association volunteers, and the City of Olathe. There are very few hints of the delicate bracelet's former shine. The Mahaffie Farmstead and Stagecoach Stop was the residence and out buildings of James and Lucinda Mahaffie, built in 1858. The farmstead later served as a stagecoach stop on the Santa Fe trail.


Buttons from the Mahaffie Farmstead and Stagecoach Stop14JO356

Buttons from the Mahaffie Farmstead and Stagecoach Stop14JO356
Date: 1858-1886
These four buttons were recovered at excavations in 1988 during a joint venture between Kansas Historical Society archeologists, Kansas Anthropological Association volunteers, and the City of Olathe. The buttons include a bone 2-hole trouser button, a white glass 4-hole dish button, a fragment of a black 2-hole button with a series of molded decorations around the edge and sew-through holes, and a black glass faceted button front. The site, 14JO356, consisted of the residence and out buildings built by James and Lucinda Mahaffie in 1858. The farmstead later served as a stagecoach stop on the Santa Fe trail.


C. H. Hyer's Boot and Shoes in Olathe, Kansas

C. H. Hyer's Boot and Shoes in Olathe, Kansas
Date: Between 1895 and 1900
This is a photograph showing the interior of C. H. Hyer's Boot and Shoes in Olathe, Kansas. Charles H. Hyer, the son of an immigrant German shoemaker, arrived in Leavenworth in 1870 and worked, for a time, building railroads. He soon moved to Olathe and got a job teaching shoe and harness making at the Kansas School for the Deaf. With the money he saved, he opened his own shoemaking shop in Olathe and asked his brother, Ed, to join him in running the business. In the years that followed, the Hyers developed a measurement chart to send out with their flyers that enabled customers, even cowboys at the remotest ranches, to order custom made boots to fit their precise size and fashion preference. The business blossomed and, by 1900, it had grown from two employees to 15. During World War I, the Hyers made boots for the officers at Fort Leavenworth and at Camp Funston. By the 1960s more than 70 people were busy making boots for a worldwide clientele.


C. H. Hyer's Boot and Shoes in Olathe, Kansas

C. H. Hyer's Boot and Shoes in Olathe, Kansas
Creator: McVay
Date: 1892
This is a photograph showing C. H. Hyer's Boot and Shoe Shop in Olathe, Kansas. C. H. Hyer is fifth from the left wearing a hat.


Celebration at Hyer Boot Company in Olathe, Kansas

Celebration at Hyer Boot Company in Olathe, Kansas
Date: 1962
Here two photographs show Earl Hawkins celebrating 50 years with the Hyer Boot Company in Olathe, Kansas. Pictured left to right are Edith Hyer, Anna Hawkins, A. E. Hyer, Earl Hawkins, Amelia Hyer, and C. A. Hyer; and in the second photograph, Anna Hawkins, Earl Hawkins, Amelia Hyer and C. A. Hyer.


Championship of Woman

Championship of Woman
Creator: Train, George Francis, 1829-1904
Date: 1867
This pamphlet contains excerpts from and/or newspaper accounts of thirty speeches that George Francis Train, a supporter of women's rights, gave in Kansas over a two week period in October and November of 1867. Train came to Kansas after participating in an excursion to the Rocky Mountains with approximately 200 newspapermen to hunt buffalo. Numerous Kansas women's suffrage supporters are mentioned in the booklet. Train gave speeches in Leavenworth, Lawrence, Olathe, Paola, Ottawa, Mound City, Fort Scott, LeRoy, Humboldt, Burlington, Emporia, Junction City, Topeka, Atchison, Wyandotte, and possibly other communities. Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton were also campaigning in Kansas and shared the podium and/or communicated with Train. Train was an author, speaker, and a celebrity for his eccentricity.


Charles August Hyer and Amelia Hyer

Charles August Hyer and Amelia Hyer
Date: Between 1965 and 1970
This photograph shows Charles August Hyer and Amelia Hyer standing in front of a Hyer Boot Company exhibit. Charles August Hyer was the son of Charles Henry Hyer, founder of Hyer Boot Company. Charles Henry Hyer, the son of an immigrant German shoemaker, arrived in Leavenworth in 1870 and worked, for a time, building railroads. He soon moved to Olathe and got a job teaching shoe and harness making at the Kansas School for the Deaf. With money he saved, he opened his own shoemaking shop in Olathe and asked his brother, Ed, to join him in running the business. In the years that followed, the Hyers developed a measurement chart to send out with their flyers that enabled customers, even cowboys at the remotest ranches, to order custom made boots to fit their precise size and fashion preference. The business blossomed and, by 1900, it had grown from two employees to 15. During World War I, the Hyers made boots for the officers at Fort Leavenworth and at Camp Funston. By the 1960s more than 70 people were busy making boots for a worldwide clientele. After Charles Henry Hyer died in 1921, his sons managed the company.


Charles H. Hyer

Charles H. Hyer
Date: Between 1955 and 1960
Charles H. Hyer, the owner of the Hyer Boot Company in Olathe, Kansas. Hyer, the son of a German shoemaker, arrived in Leavenworth in 1870 and worked, for a time, building railroads. He soon moved to Olathe and got a job teaching shoe and harness making at the Kansas School for the Deaf. With the money he saved, he opened his own shoemaking shop in Olathe and asked his brother, Ed, to join him in running the business. In the years that followed, the Hyers developed a measurement chart to send out with their flyers that enabled customers, even cowboys at the remotest ranches, to order custom made boots to fit their precise size and fashion preference. The business blossomed and, by 1900, it had grown from two employees to 15. During World War I, the Hyers made boots for the officers at Fort Leavenworth and at Camp Funston. By the 1960s more than 70 people were busy making boots for a worldwide clientele. Charles Henry Hyer married Minnie Katherine Allsteadt and they had five children: Charles August Hyer, born August 18, 1891; Anna Fredericka Hyer, born 1880; William Henry III Hyer, born 1883; Minnie June Hyer, born 1885; and Albert Edward Hyer, born 1896.


Charles H. Hyer

Charles H. Hyer
Date: 1911
This is a photograph of Charles H. Hyer, who owned The Hyer Boot Company. Hyer, the son of an immigrant German shoemaker, settled in Leavenworth in 1870 and worked, for a time, building railroads. He soon moved to Olathe and got a job teaching shoe and harness making at the Kansas School for the Deaf. With money he saved, he opened his own shoemaking shop in Olathe and asked his brother, Ed, to join him in running the business. In the years that followed, the Hyers developed a measurement chart to send out with their flyers that enabled customers, even cowboys at the remotest ranches, to order custom made boots to fit their precise size and fashion preference. The business blossomed and, by 1900, it had grown from two employees to 15. During World War I, the Hyers made boots for the officers at Fort Leavenworth and at Camp Funston. By the 1960s more than 70 people were busy making boots for a worldwide clientele. This photograph was taken while Hyer, a Republican, was serving in the 1911 Kansas House of Representatives representating District 10 from Olathe, Kansas.


Charles Henry Hyer

Charles Henry Hyer
Creator: Colville, Photographer
Date: 1911
This is a photograph of Charles Henry Hyer, who owned The Hyer Boot Company. Hyer, the son of an immigrant German shoemaker, settled in Leavenworth in 1870 and worked, for a time, building railroads. He soon moved to Olathe and got a job teaching shoe and harness making at the Kansas School for the Deaf. With money he saved, he opened his own shoemaking shop in Olathe and asked his brother, Ed, to join him in running the business. In the years that followed, the Hyers developed a measurement chart to send out with their flyers that enabled customers, even cowboys at the remotest ranches, to order custom made boots to fit their precise size and fashion preference. The business blossomed and, by 1900, it had grown from two employees to 15. During World War I, the Hyers made boots for the officers at Fort Leavenworth and at Camp Funston. By the 1960s more than 70 people were busy making boots for a worldwide clientele. This photograph was taken while Hyer, a Republican, was serving in the 1911 Kansas House of Representatives representating District 10 from Olathe, Kansas.


Charles R. Green to George W. Martin

Charles R. Green to George W. Martin
Creator: Green, Charles R.
Date: June 28, 1910
In this letter to George W. Martin, Charles R. Green addresses details of Sac and Fox history.


Charles R. Green to George W. Martin

Charles R. Green to George W. Martin
Creator: Green, Charles R.
Date: June 20, 1910
In this letter to George W. Martin, Charles R. Green addresses information related to the Sac and Fox tribe. Green, proprietor of Green's Library and Museum in Olathe, Kansas, explains that he interviewed a missionary named Samuel Black, who once served as a missionary for the Sac and Fox. Green explains that Black assisted in recruiting African American men to fight in Company K, 1st U.S. Colored Troops.


Citizens Alliance No. 41

Citizens Alliance No. 41
Creator: Zercher, Daniel C.,
Date: 1890s
A People's Party Citizens Alliance publication enumerating their political platform, resolution and by-laws.


Courthouse, Olathe, Kansas

Courthouse, Olathe, Kansas
Date: Between 1891 and 1901
This black and white postcard shows a view of the Johnson County courthouse in Olathe, Kansas. The two-story brick structure, designed in 1891 by architect George Washburn, served the residents of Johnson County until it was demolished in 1952.


Dishes from the Mahaffie Farmstead and Stagecoach Stop, 14JO356

Dishes from the Mahaffie Farmstead and Stagecoach Stop, 14JO356
Date: 1858-1886
These three dish sherds, all with a different floral patterns, were among many recovered during excavations in 1988 at a joint venture between Kansas Historical Society archeologists, Kansas Anthropological Association volunteers, and the City of Olathe. The site consisted of the residence and out buildings built by James and Lucinda Mahaffie in 1858. The farmstead later served as a stagecoach stop on the Santa Fe trail.


E. B. Gill to Governo John St. John

E. B. Gill to Governo John St. John
Creator: Gill, E. B.
Date: March 04, 1880
Kansas Governor St. John is invited to speak in Olathe, Kansas on March 7th, 1880.


E. B. Reynolds to Governor John St. John

E. B. Reynolds to Governor John St. John
Creator: Reynolds, E. B.
Date: September 19, 1879
E. B. Reynolds, a strong supporter and campaigner for the temperance movement, expresses concern over the lack of publicity given the upcoming state convention and suggests circulars be prepared for widespread distribution.


East Park Street, Olathe, Kansas

East Park Street, Olathe, Kansas
Date: Between 1940 and 1945
Postcard view of East Park Street, Olathe, Kansas.


Ed Hyer

Ed Hyer
Creator: Huffman, J. B.
Date: Between 1895 and 1900
This is a cabinet card photograph showing Ed Hyer. He joined his brother Charles H. Hyer in the Hyer Brothers Boots and Shoes in Olathe, Kansas. The business blossomed and, by 1900, it had grown from two employees to 15. During World War I, the Hyers made boots for the officers at Fort Leavenworth and at Camp Funston. Later, it was known as the Hyer Boot Company. By the 1960s more than 70 people were busy making boots for a worldwide clientele.


Edwin Lee Booth to Local Board #1 of Olathe, Kansas

Edwin Lee Booth to Local Board #1 of Olathe, Kansas
Creator: Booth, Edwin Lee
Date: July 10, 1943
This letter from Edwin Lee Booth of Mission, Kansas, describes his reasons for not reporting to the Civilian Public Service (CPS) camp at Hill City, South Dakota. Booth, a motorcycle mechanic, argues that his duty as minister prohibits him from working for the U.S. government. The CPS camp at Hill City was built to help support the completion of the Deerfield Dam which was designed to provide water for Rapid City, South Dakota, as well as much of the surrounding countryside.


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