Kansas MemoryKansas Memory

Kansas Historical SocietyKansas Historical Society

-

Log In

Username:

Password:

After login, go to:

Register
Forgot Username?
Forgot Password?

Browse Users
Contact us

-

Martha Farnsworth

-

Podcast Archive

Governor Mike Hayden Interview
Details
Listen Now
Subscribe - iTunesSubscribe - RSS

More podcasts

-

Popular Item

Winter 1977, Volume 43, Number 4

-

Random Item

Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company depot, Lebo, Kansas Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company depot, Lebo, Kansas

-

Site Statistics

Total images: 631,040
Bookbag items: 37,183
Registered users: 11,253

-

About

Kansas Memory has been created by the Kansas State Historical Society to share its historical collections via the Internet. Read more.

-

Syndication

Matching items: 7

Category Filters

Transportation - Non-motorized - Wind wagons

Search within these results


       

Search Tips

Start Over | RSS Feed RSS Feed

View: Image Only | Title Only | Detailed
Sort by: TitleSort by Title, Ascending | Date | Creator | Newest

Showing 1 - 7 of 7 (results per page: 10 | 25 | 50)


Hand sketch of Peppard wind wagon

Hand sketch of Peppard wind wagon
Creator: Peppard, George Rolla
Date: Between 1860 and 1880
George Rolla Peppard sketched this drawing of a Peppard Wind Wagon. This innovation of the Kansas territorial period capitalized on an abundant natural resource, wind. In 1860 wind wagons, sometimes called sailing wagons, received considerable attention in the press. Similar to an ordinary light wagon, they weighed about 350 pounds and had a bed about three feet wide, eight feet long, and six inches deep. A sail or sails raised over the center of the front axle propelled the wagons. When the wind blew in the right direction the wagons were reported to skim over the prairies at about 15 miles per hour, with speeds at up to 40 miles per hour.


Mercury wagon converted into a wind wagon near Green, Kansas

Mercury wagon converted into a wind wagon near Green, Kansas
Creator: Klocke, Richard R.
Date: 1961
Two photographs taken by Richard Klocke show a child's Mercury wagon converted into a wind wagon by Richard who lived on a farm near Green, Kansas. He built the wind wagon when he was eight years old. Klocke scavenged all the materials, the canvas sail was a discarded curtain from a fire at Green High School. His initials RK are visible in the lower right corner and an elephant is drawn on part of the sail. The mast was a piece of scrap lumber jammed into a Zero antifreeze can, which was obtained from the Skelly filling station in Green. The station was started by his grandfather and later operated by his uncle Elwood Branfort and his father Ivan Klocke. Richard Klocke operated the wagon by using one hand to hang onto a twine string from the corners of the sail and the other hand on the wagon tongue to steer from the rear like a rudder. The wind wagon would go up on two wheels when rounding corners. Klocke would travel west from his house on 21st Road over to the next farm where his friend Melvin Anderson lived and occasionally north on Stokes Street. He would walk home after going a long distance down one of the roads. The Mercury wagon is in the Kansas State Historical Society's museum.


Samuel Peppard scrapbook

Samuel Peppard scrapbook
Date: 1865-1990
This scrapbook contains letters, photographs, newspaper articles, military records, government records relating to Samuel Peppard, known for his "Peppard wind-wagon." A novel device of the Kansas territorial period was the wind wagon, sometimes called a sailing wagon. Several were built and in 1860 the press gave them considerable attention. They were similar to an ordinary light wagon; weighed about 350 pounds; had a bed about three feet wide, eight feet long, and six inches deep; and were propelled by a sail or sails raised over the center of the front axle. When the breezes blew in the right direction the wagons were reported to skim over the prairies at about 15 miles per hour, with speeds at up to 40 miles per hour. Peppard gained notice when he attempted to "sail" his wagon from Oskaloosa to eastern Colorado. Peppard was born in Wayne County, Ohio on September 20, 1833 and died in Oskaloosa, Kansas on April 20, 1916.


Wind wagon

Wind wagon
Date: Between 1860 and 1890
These two sketches of wind wagons have been clipped from unidentified newspapers. This innovation of the Kansas territorial period capitalized on an abundant natural resource, wind. In 1860 wind wagons, sometimes called sailing wagons, received considerable attention in the press. Similar to an ordinary light wagon, they weighed about 350 pounds and had a bed about three feet wide, eight feet long, and six inches deep. A sail or sails raised over the center of the front axle propelled the wagons. When the wind blew in the right direction the wagons were reported to skim over the prairies at about 15 miles per hour, with speeds up to 40 miles per hour.


Wind wagon, Logan County, Kansas

Wind wagon, Logan County, Kansas
Date: Between 1890 and 1899
This photograph shows George Bull and Clint McIntosh with a wind wagon, Logan County, Kansas.


Wind wagon sketch from Leslie's Illustrated

Wind wagon sketch from Leslie's Illustrated
Date: July 7, 1860
An illustration from Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, with caption "wind ship wagon, now used for travelling over the prairies-from a sketch from our correspondent." This innovation of the Kansas territorial period capitalized on an abundant natural resource, wind. In 1860 wind wagons, sometimes called sailing wagons, received considerable attention in the press. Similar to an ordinary light wagon, they weighed about 350 pounds and had a bed about three feet wide, eight feet long, and six inches deep. A sail or sails raised over the center of the front axle propelled the wagons. When the wind blew in the right direction the wagons were reported to skim over the prairies at about 15 miles per hour, with speeds up to 40 miles per hour.


Wind wagon with living quarters inside

Wind wagon with living quarters inside
Date: Between 1870 and 1900
In this photograph, a man stands in front of a wind wagon with living quarters. This innovation of the Kansas territorial period capitalized on an abundant natural resource, wind. In 1860 wind wagons, sometimes called sailing wagons, received considerable attention in the press. Similar to an ordinary light wagon, they weighed about 350 pounds and had a bed about three feet wide, eight feet long, and six inches deep. A sail or sails raised over the center of the front axle propelled the wagons. When the wind blew in the right direction the wagons were reported to skim over the prairies at about 15 miles per hour, with speeds up to 40 miles per hour.


Showing 1 - 7

Copyright © 2007-2019 - Kansas Historical Society - Contact Us
This website was developed in part with funding provided by the Information Network of Kansas.