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Caretaker's cottage at the Hollenberg Pony Express Station, Washington County, Kansas Caretaker's cottage at the Hollenberg Pony Express Station, Washington County, Kansas

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A. Barnes to Governor John St. John

A. Barnes to Governor John St. John
Creator: Barnes, A.
Date: August 22, 1880
A letter from A. Barnes of Junction City to Kansas Governor St. John. Barnes sends a list of speakers he would prefer attend the upcoming campaign and also references a controversial temperance article written by noted Kansas lawyer, Judge Humphrey.


A. C. Pierce to Governor John St. John

A. C. Pierce to Governor John St. John
Creator: Pierce, A. C.
Date: November 10, 1880
A letter from A. C. Pierce of Junction City to Kansas Governor St. John in which Pierce comments on organizing the House and expresses doubt about candidates being considered for Speaker and Clerk.


A Plan to Place the Business of Farming Upon a Paying Basis

A Plan to Place the Business of Farming Upon a Paying Basis
Creator: Geary County Farmer's Alliance and Industrial Union
Date: 1891
At its meeting in Junction City on December 17, 1890, the Geary County Farmer's Alliance and Industrial Union appointed a committee of John Hay, J. L. Hulse and Jas. H. Gabby to report to the group on how farmers might be more profitable. They reported on Jan. 10, 1891, and their plan was adopted by the Geary County Farmer's Alliance and Industrial Union. It calls for farmers to work together to impact prices and supplies rather than being at the mercy of purchasers and speculators. It encouraged an effort to jointly hold back cattle from the Kansas City market for one day in an effort to increase the prices paid to farmers.


African American soldier

African American soldier
Creator: Emery, A. G.
Date: Between 1881 and 1885
Portrait of an unidentified African American soldier who served in the 9th Cavalry at Fort Riley, Kansas.


Alexander C. Spilman to Samuel N. Wood

Alexander C. Spilman to Samuel N. Wood
Creator: Spillman, A. C.
Date: January 14, 1861
From Salina, Alexander Carraway Spilman wrote "as one of your [Wood's] constituents" regarding his opposition to a Junction City proposal that to change the boundary line between Dickinson and Davis counties to increase the size of the former at the expense of the latter. Spilman believed "A change in the lines of Dickinson would necessarily involve a change in the lines of Saline which is something that must not be done under any circumstances."


Alf Landon's campaign truck, Junction City, Kansas

Alf Landon's campaign truck, Junction City, Kansas
Creator: Smith, Guy E.
Date: Between 1932 and 1934
This black and white photograph shows Alf Landon's campaign truck in Junction City, Kansas. Landon was elected in 1932 as the twenty-sixth governor of Kansas and was re-elected in 1934.


Ansley Gray to Governor John St. John

Ansley Gray to Governor John St. John
Creator: Gray, Ansley
Date: April 10, 1880
Ansley Gray of Junction City, writes Kansas Governor St. John to determine what day he may come visit him.


Ansley Gray to Governor John St. John

Ansley Gray to Governor John St. John
Creator: Gray, Ansley
Date: July 26, 1880
This is a letter from temperance worker Ansley Gray, Junction City, Kansas, who is planning a trip to visit several Kansas cities. Gray requests railroad discounts from Kansas Governor St. John.


Art Work on Eastern Kansas

Art Work on Eastern Kansas
Creator: Western Photogravure Company
Date: 1900
This pictorial book gives a brief overview of eastern Kansas. This is part eight of twelve. Views from Burnett's Mound in Topeka, the Republican River in Junction City, and the Goodlander hotel in Fort Scott are some of the featured photographs.


Art Work on Eastern Kansas

Art Work on Eastern Kansas
Creator: Western Photogravure Company
Date: 1900
This pictorial book gives a brief overview of eastern Kansas. This is part nine of twelve. Views of Manhattan from Mount Prospect, the Jane C. Stormont Hospital and Christ's Hospital in Topeka, and Fort Scott National Cemetery are some of the featured photographs.


Autograph quilt

Autograph quilt
Creator: Burgett, Marie Marcellus
Date: 1986
Blue and white quilt featuring the embroidered signatures of 24 prominent Kansans. Made by Marie Marcellus Burgett of Junction City to celebrate Kansas' 125th anniversary of statehood, 1986. Burgett obtained the signatures of 24 living Kansans on white fabric squares, and embroidered the signatures along with a summary of each individual's achievements. The quilt won a grand prize at the Riley County Fair, and reserve champion prize at the Geary County Fair, and was exhibited in the Kansas Capitol. According to Burgett, the blue fabric represents the Kansas skies. Made of cotton/synthetic blend fabrics. White binding and navy blue backing. Machine-pieced. Hand-quilted with outline stitching around signatures, and also sunflower and wheat designs.


Bird's eye view of Junction City, Kansas

Bird's eye view of Junction City, Kansas
Creator: Glover, E. S. (Eli Sheldon), 1844-1920
Date: 1878
A color lithograph of Junction City, Kansas, looking northwest with insets of the town and Fort Riley, Kansas. One inset is dated 1867. The lithograph shows the location of buildings, churches, hotels, railroad and structures on Fort Riley. A legend is provided to identify some of the buildings.


Bloomer and Mother Hubbard baseball team, Junction City, Kansas

Bloomer and Mother Hubbard baseball team, Junction City, Kansas
Date: Between 1900 and 1915
This is an informal portrait of the members of the Bloomer and Mother Hubbard baseball team in Junction City, Kansas. Some of the players are dressed in women's dresses and bonnets. Also visible are spectators on the bleachers behind the team.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Date: Between 1917 and 1919
This panoramic view shows Camp Funston on the Ft. Riley military reservation near Junction City, Kansas. The facility, named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp, were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Date: Between 1917 and 1919
These four panoramic views show Camp Funston on the Ft. Riley military reservation near Junction City, Kansas. The facility named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp, were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Date: Between 1917 and 1919
This panoramic view shows Camp Funston on the Ft. Riley military reservation near Junction City, Kansas. The facility named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp, were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Date: Between 1917 and 1919
This black and white photograph shows a mess hall at Camp Funston on the Ft. Riley military reservation near Junction City, Kansas. The facility, named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Creator: Baird Company Engravers
Date: Between 1917 and 1919
These two photographs show the mess hall and kitchen at Remount Station at Camp Funston on the Ft. Riley military reservation near Junction City, Kansas. The facility, named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Date: Between 1917 and 1919
These five black and white photographs show construction at Camp Funston on the Ft. Riley military reservation near Junction City, Kansas. The facility, named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp, were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Creator: Pennell Photo
Date: 1917
This panoramic view shows Camp Funston on the Ft. Riley military reservation near Junction City, Kansas. The facility, named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Date: Between 1917 and 1919
This panoramic view shows Camp Funston on the Ft. Riley military reservation near Junction City, Kansas. The facility, named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp, were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Date: Between 1917 and 1919
This black and white photograph shows the nurses' home at Camp Funston on the Ft. Riley military reservation near Junction City, Kansas. The facility named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp, were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Creator: Williams, Verne O. & Stead, Chas A., K.C. Mo.
Date: August 29, 1917
This panoramic view shows Camp Funston on the Ft. Riley military reservation near Junction City, Kansas. The facility, named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Creator: Williams, Verne O. & Stead, Chas A., K.C. Mo.
Date: September 19, 1917
This panoramic view shows Camp Funston on the Ft. Riley military reservation near Junction City, Kansas. The facility, named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp, were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Creator: Williams, Verne O. & Stead, Chas A., K.C. Mo.
Date: July 25, 1917
This panoramic view shows Camp Funston on the Ft. Riley military reservation near Junction City, Kansas. The facility, named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The number of buildings estimated to have been built as the camp were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


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