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Albert C. Morton to Hiram Hill

Albert C. Morton to Hiram Hill
Creator: Morton, Albert C.
Date: August 8, 1857
Albert Morton wrote from Quindaro, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts. Morton related that the fall emigration had begun, Quindaro was crowded, and more buildings were being constructed than ever before. Morton also had found two men interested in renting the home owned by Hill upon its completion. He suggested that it would be best to "keep things quiet" about Samuel N. Simpson, and asked, on the behalf of Guthrie, if Hill planned to travel again to Quindaro.


Anna Margaret Watson Randolph, diary

Anna Margaret Watson Randolph, diary
Creator: Randolph, Anna Margaret Watson, 1838-1917
Date: August 17, 1858 - August 22, 1858
This brief diary, kept by Anna Margaret (Watson) Randolph, begins with her move to Kansas in an entry dated August 17, 1858. These six entries at the beginning of her diary provide details about her family's journey from Ohio to Kansas Territory, included a number of interesting accounts of their journey on a riverboat. Their boat ran aground several times and, interspersed among her descriptions of these difficulties, Anna wrote about her sister Mary Jane, the weather, and her personal observances of other passengers. She also filled her diary with her frustrations and concerns during their arduous journey west.


"Aunt Sally" steamboat on the Arkansas River

"Aunt Sally" steamboat on the Arkansas River
Date: 1878
A view of a large crowd of people aboard the steamboat "Aunt Sally" as it lies docked somewhere along the Arkansas River in Kansas. The boat is riding low in the water because of the weight of the crowd aboard it. Note that the photograph image is backward (see the reversed name on the paddle wheel housing near the stern).


Benjamin "Pap" Singleton and S. A. McClure

Benjamin "Pap" Singleton and S. A. McClure
Date: 1876
This photograph depicts a steamboat containing freed people in Nashville, Tennessee, with Benjamin "Pap" Singleton and S. A. McClure superimposed in the foreground. Singleton, known as the "Father of the Exodus" for the Exoduster Movement in 1879, organized the Tennessee Real Estate and Homestead Association to facilitate black emigration from the South. His town company founded the Dunlap Colony in Morris County, and a short-lived settlement in Cherokee County, Kansas. His widespread use of advertisements encouraged thousands of former slaves to emigrate to Kansas. McClure was one of his associates and advocate for emigration.


Bird's eye view of Oak Dale Park, Salina, Kansas

Bird's eye view of Oak Dale Park, Salina, Kansas
Creator: Ramsey, Millett & Hudson Lith., Kansas City, MO.
Date: 1879
Artist Augustus Koch drew this bird's eye view of Oak Dale Park in Salina, Kansas, in the 1870s and Ramsey, Millett & Hudsen, lithographers of Kansas City, Missouri, created this print in 1879. The print shows the park confined within a bow of the Smoky Hill River outside of Salina. W. R. Geis owned the property and was secretary and manager of the Kansas State Tournament which was held at the park from October 7 - 11, 1879. Besides Geis, tournament organizers included L. C. Wasson, Ottawa; C. J. Kendall, Osage City; J. D. Patterson, Lawrence; Willis Kesler, Salina; D. R. Wagstaff, Salina; W. S. Stambaugh, Abilene. The park included a Swiss cottage (park hotel), a bowling alley, an exposition hall, a flying dutchman merry-go-round, a grand stand and half-mile track, a judge's stand, Vahn's greenhouse, training stables, a ticket office, bird traps and shooting stand, and a river boat steamer called the "Belle of Salina." Since 1977 the park has been home to the annual Smoky Hill River Festival arts fair.


Bird's eye view of the city of Atchison, Kansas

Bird's eye view of the city of Atchison, Kansas
Date: 1869
This colored lithograph is a bird's eye view of Atchison, Kansas, the county seat of Atchison County. The legend at the bottom of the image lists the Court House, Jail, the Public School, St. Benedict's College (Benedictine), Turner Hall, the shops of the Central Branch of the Union Pacific Railroad, the Missouri Valley Railroad depot, and a number of churches. Two African American churches are included in the list. Several of the numbers from the legend are difficult to locate on the lithograph. The name of the artist and the publisher of the lithograph are not legible. The Missouri River forms the eastern boundary of Atchison and Winthrop, Missouri, is across the river from Atchison. A number of steamboats are shown on the river including the N. S. Turner.


C. E. Blood to Isaac Tichenor Goodnow

C. E. Blood to Isaac Tichenor Goodnow
Creator: Blood, C.E.
Date: June 20, 1859
C. E. Blood wrote from Manhattan, Kansas Territory, to Isaac Goodnow, imparting that the steamboat Gus Linn had arrived in Manhattan and a Mr. Devivilvi [Devivaldi] brought along his printing press and other equipment. The newspaper was then a "fixed and permanent fact." Blood updated Goodnow on the status of construction at the College and Joseph Denison's new home. He closed by reporting a rumor that there was a Republican majority in the Constitutional Convention at Wyandotte.


Charles Robinson account book

Charles Robinson account book
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: December 1856 - April 1857
This cloth bound journal is identified as "Dr. Charles Robinson Account Book, 1856-1866." It contains only territorial entries for the years of 1856 and 1857. These entries include the following: S. W. Simpson to Joel Walker draft to purchase land for $500 and notes receivable to sell livestock to Thaddeus Hyatt . The understanding being that Hyatt shall not receive his certificate for shares note until he has placed upon the Kaw River a steamboat of 40 tons buthen,valued at $5000., and suitable to navigate that river.


Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday
Creator: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: September 26, 1855 - September 30, 1855
Cyrus K. Holliday wrote twelve pages from Topeka, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. Anxious to have her and their young daughter, Lillie, with him, and unable to come for them himself, Cyrus gave detailed business and travel instructions. He suggested that I. H. Lenhart go to New York to exchange their bonds for gold or bills from the State Bank of Missouri. Mary was to keep the money close and beware of thieves. He also gave instructions concerning route, railroads and steamboats, tickets, baggage, and escorts. Cyrus suggested that Mary travel with F. R. Foster of Spring Corners, Pennsylvania or an agent of an Express Company. Her safety and ease during the nine day journey was his main concern. (Mary and Lillie did not join Cyrus in Topeka until March 1857.)


Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday
Date: December 13, 1855
Cyrus K. Holliday, who had been appointed colonel of the 2nd Regiment of Kansas Troops, hoped that the Wakarusa War would be the last armed conflict in Kansas Territory. Writing from Free State Headquarters in Lawrence, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania, he described the preparations of troops in Lawrence during the War. He told Mary of his receipt of a draft and the sale of a bond, and assured her that the boats to Kansas were still running.


Dam construction, Shawnee County, Kansas

Dam construction, Shawnee County, Kansas
Date: Between 1890 and 1900
This photograph shows men working on a dam beside a wooden railroad bridge over a river in Shawnee County, Kansas. A small steamboat and barges are carrying materials on the river and an open railroad car is carrying stone. Cranes and pulleys are being used to lift the stones.


E. B. Whitman to Samuel L. Adair

E. B. Whitman to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Whitman, E. B. (Edmund Burke), 1812-1883
Date: May 15, 1857
E. B. Whitman, located in Lawrence, was the general agent for the National Kansas Committee that was distributing relief supplies in Kansas Territory. He writes that he is sending Adair potatoes and corn to be distributed for planting. Evidently, Adair had written him previously about some boxes of supplies he expected, and Whitman speculates that some boxes might be on the steamer "Light Foot" on the Kansas River in Wyandotte, Kansas Territory, and some might be in St. Louis, Missouri.


Ehrenbreitstein, Germany

Ehrenbreitstein, Germany
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: Spring 1919
During the time the Army of Occupation was located in Germany, Captain Hughes took this picture of Ehrenbreitstein. A large steamboat is shown in the foreground of the photo. James C. Hughes, as part of the 35th Division, left Fort Sill, Oklahoma, and traveled to Hoboken, New Jersey, where he boarded the troop ship "Ceramic" on May 18, 1918. Hughes arrived in Liverpool, England, on June 1, 1918 and then landed at Le Havre, France, on June 9, 1918. Hughes fought in the battles of St. Michael and the Meuse-Argonne. He was at Verdun on Armistice Day, November 11, 1918. He took no photos of the actual fighting. He did take many photographs after the war as part of the Army of Occupation until he left France on July 18, 1919. A full biography of James Clark Hughes is available at the link below to Kansapedia.


Erastus D. Ladd & Prentiss to Hiram Hill

Erastus D. Ladd & Prentiss to Hiram Hill
Creator: Ladd, Erastus D
Date: June 27 & 29, 1857
Erastus Ladd wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill, who had returned from the Territory to Massachusetts. Ladd explained that the delay in Hill's receiving a map of West Lawrence was on account of the sinking of the steamboat on which the maps were shipped. He also asked Hill for his confirmation of the maintenance agreement several of Hill's renters claimed were in place. Ladd told Hill that new businesses had rented space in his Cincinnati House (previously a boarding house).


F.A. Hunt to Thomas H. Webb

F.A. Hunt to Thomas H. Webb
Creator: Hunt, F. A.
Date: March 14, 1856
F. A. Hunt, owner of a steamboat and land agent company, wrote from St. Louis, Missouri to Thomas H. Webb, secretary of the New England Emigrant Aid Company. Hunt informed Webb that a shipment of 100 rifles and two guns had been seized at Lexington, Missouri while in transit to Leavenworth via the Steamboat Arabia. Hunt stated that unless the weapons had been taken by authority of the U.S. government, the steamboat was liable for the loss. Hunt urged Webb to be more cautious in making shipments of weapons to Kansas.


F.A. Hunt to William Barnes

F.A. Hunt to William Barnes
Date: April 18, 1857
F. A. Hunt, owner of a steamboat and land agent company, wrote from Wyandotte to William Barnes, secretary of the New York State Kansas Committee. Hunt promoted Wyandotte as a destination for potential emigrants to Kansas Territory.


George Walter, History of Kanzas

George Walter, History of Kanzas
Creator: Walter, George
Date: 1855
This history was written by George Walter, agent for the New York Kanzas League. The purpose of the League was to assist individuals and families to emigrate to Kansas and help provides reduced prices and other assistance. The office of the New York Kanzas League was located on the 3rd floor of No. 110 Broadway, New York City. Walter provided the information he thought emigrants to Kansas would need including descriptions of the situation in the territory, its climate, soil, rivers, and native products. He also gave information about industry in Kansas Territory, particularly the milling industry. He provided information on routes and supplies needed as well as a copy of the reemption law. The text of the Bill to organize the territories of Kansas and Nebraska was included on pages 24 through 48 of the pamphlet.


Hannibal, Missouri

Hannibal, Missouri
Creator: Tavernier, Jules, 1844-1889
Date: June 1874
This is an illustration showing trains and steamboats at Hannibal, Missouri. The illustration appears in The Great South-West, June 1874. It is credited to both Paul Frenzeny and Jules Tavernier.


Hiram Hill to Dear Brother

Hiram Hill to Dear Brother
Creator: Hill, Hiram, 1804-
Date: October 16, 1857
Hiram Hill wrote from a steamboat en route to Kansas Territory to his brother. Hill reported no major trouble on the journey until he had reached St. Louis and discovered that there had been a "run on the Missouri Bank" : no Eastern money was available, and businesses were not accepting paper money. Hill seemed to attribute this money shortage to a recent rush of emigration, and thought the situation would improve in the winter, though at the moment in Lawrence and Quindaro things were at a standstill since no one could withdraw money.


Hiram Hill to Dear Brother

Hiram Hill to Dear Brother
Creator: Hill, Hiram, 1804-
Date: May 13, 1855
After arriving in Kansas City by steamboat, Hiram Hill wrote to his brother. En route, four men had died of cholera while others continued to drink and play cards nearby. Disease fatalities were common, Hill reported. He speculated that the river water, which passengers drank, was contaminated with disease from the rich prairie soil. Hill described life at the Winedot [sic] Indian Reservation (beginning at the bottom of page 2) where he met the "prinsable chiefe" and saw the governor's sister. Hill related news concerning Mr. Putnam, Mr. Tomas, Mr. Gague, Mr. Jay, Mr. Partridge, Mr. Whitman, Mr. Pomeroy, Mr. Fuller and others. He was skeptical that these men would permanently settle in Kansas Territory. Hill also described Kansas City, which he thought would improve under "yankee," rather than "slave holder," management. (Hill's final destination was Lawrence, where he acquired town lots through quit claims not included in this online project.)


Hiram Hill to Dear Wife

Hiram Hill to Dear Wife
Creator: Hill, Hiram, 1804-
Date: November 31, 1855
Hiram Hill wrote from Lexi[ng]ton, Missouri to his wife in Williamsburgh, Massachusetts on his way to Lawrence, Kansas Territory. The low river had forced him and other steamboat passengers to come ashore 25 miles short of Lexington. Once there, he heard rumors of war, reporting that Missourians "all armed to the teeth" were entering the Territory. Hill was sick and wished to turn back, but fellow travelers Mr. Whitney and Judge Johnson planned to continue. Hill included a brief message for his adopted son, Arthur.


Hiram Hill to Dear Wife

Hiram Hill to Dear Wife
Creator: Hill, Hiram, 1804-
Date: November 26, 1855
Hiram Hill, a resident of Williamsburgh, Massachusetts wrote to his wife from St. Louis, Missouri, on his way to Lawrence, Kansas Territory, where he owned property. Hill had traveled by railroad and boat and was now a passenger on the steamboat Senora. Ticket prices were high due to the late season. Also on board were Erastus D. Ladd, who was elected to the Topeka free state legislature on March 30th, and Thaddeus L. Whitney, a friend and business associate. Hill also mentioned Mr. Pom[e]roy and Mr. Eldridge. Interestingly, a second letter dated December 20 and perhaps from Hill's wife to her sister-in-law (the wife of Hiram's brother Otis) was written on a blank page.


Hiram Hill to Dear Wife

Hiram Hill to Dear Wife
Date: May 7, 1855
Hiram Hill of Williamsburgh, Massachusetts wrote to his wife while traveling up the Missouri River from St. Louis to Kansas City. Hill was a free soil sympathizer evidentially traveling with a company of like-minded settlers, for he wrote that some steamboat passengers viewed the company with "rather suspitious eyes." Hill told his wife not to worry although one family had cholera and, on another boat, fifteen had died the previous week. The letter, written hastily in pencil, is not signed.


Hiram Hill to O.G. Hill

Hiram Hill to O.G. Hill
Creator: Hill, Hiram, 1804-
Date: March 18, 1857
Hiram Hill, en route to Kansas Territory, wrote from Jefferson City, Missouri, to his brother back east. Hill reported that the journey so far had been pleasant, though they had been delayed by a train wreck and were currently waiting for a boat to take them up the River. He mentioned his experiences with border ruffians, finding that they were "civil" unless they "get too much whiskey down". Hill lamented the resignation of Kansas Territory's Governor Geary, but related that he saw the new marshal, who was on his way to K.T., in St. Louis.


Ho! For Kansas!!

Ho! For Kansas!!
Creator: Wood, Bradford R.
Date: May 20, 1856
This circular by the New York State Kansas Committee announces the departure of another party to Kansas Territory. It describes how the emigrants would be traveling and provides information about how to join the party.


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