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People - American Indians - Prehistoric Cultures - Pomona

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Showing 1 - 13 of 13 (results per page: 10 | 25 | 50)


Alternately Beveled Knives from 14MY316

Alternately Beveled Knives from 14MY316
Date: 700-1500 CE
These five alternately beveled knife fragments were recovered from an archeological site along the Elk River in Montgomery County. Repeated sharpening on the knives alternate sides created the bevels. The three on the bottom are made of Permian chert and the one on the bottom right has been heat-treated prior to knapping to improve the knapping qualities of the chert. The two on the top row are made of an unknown chert. The site had house remains and is considered to be part of the Pomona focus of the Early and Middle Ceramic period. Pomona focus sites are located in eastern Kansas and western Missouri.


Arrow Points from 14MY316

Arrow Points from 14MY316
Date: 700-1500 CE
These four arrow points were recovered from an archeological site along the Elk River in Montgomery County. All are made of Florence chert which outcrops in the Flint Hills of Kansas and Oklahoma. All were heat treated, a method to improve the knapping qualities of a chert which results in a pinkish color. Two of the arrow points are triangular and two are corner-notched. The site had house remains and is considered to be part of the Pomona focus of the Early and Middle Ceramic periods. Pomona focus sites are located in eastern Kansas and western Missouri.


Dentate Stamped Pottery Sherd from the Oliphant Site, 14LT316

Dentate Stamped Pottery Sherd from the Oliphant Site, 14LT316
Date: 700-1500 CE
This pottery sherd was recovered from the Oliphant site in Labette County during excavations in 1976 by Kansas Historical Society Archeologists. The body sherd is tempered with small inclusions of hematite, manganese and an indurated (hardened) clay or shale. Ten horizontal rows of dentate stamping, some quite haphazard, decorate the sherd. Dentate stamping is a decorating technique that leaves tooth-like impressions. Dentate stamping is associated not only with Cuesta phase pottery, but also Kansas City Hopewell and Schultz phase pottery. The Oliphant site was occupied during the Early and Middle Ceramic periods.


"Eccentric" from the Infinity Site, 14MY305

"Eccentric" from the Infinity Site, 14MY305
Date: 2000-1500 BCE
This unusual chipped stone tool is made of Florence chert from the Flint Hills region that has been heat-treated prior to knapping to improve the chert knapping qualities. An artifact labeled "eccentric" has no known functional use and is often irregular in shape. It has been suggested that this eccentric may represent a bison. The artifact was recovered from the Infinity site in Montgomery County. The Infinity site is a multicomponent village with five house structures, a midden and many other features. It was occupied from the late Archaic period through the Middle Ceramic period.


End and Side Scraper from 14WO306

End and Side Scraper from 14WO306
Date: 1000-1500 CE
The scraper shown here was recovered from an archeological site in Woodson County, thought by the archeologist who discovered it to represent a Pomona occupation. The scraper is made of Permian chert and had been heat-treated prior to its completion to make it easier to knap. Scrapers may have been hafted onto a handle and used to scrape hides. They would have required periodic resharpening.


Excavations at 14CF1320

Excavations at 14CF1320
Date: 1979
These photographs were taken by Kansas Historical Society archeological staff during excavation at 14CF1320 in Coffey County in 1979. Shown is a partially excavated trash pit and a view of the excavations in progress. The site had a Pomona variant occupation in the Middle Ceramic period. Pomona archeological sites are located in eastern Kansas and western Missouri.


Excavations at 14CF369

Excavations at 14CF369
Date: 1979
These photographs were taken by during Kansas Archeology Training Program field school at 14CF369 in Coffey County in 1979. Shown are two views of the excavation in progress, a view of mapping of the excavation, and a view of the excavations prior to removal of the daub mass (clay used to finish a structure's surface). The site had a Pomona variant occupation in the Middle Ceramic period. Pomona archeological sites are located in eastern Kansas and western Missouri.


Excavations at 14MY2336

Excavations at 14MY2336
Date: 1993
Shown are six views of the Phase III excavations undertaken in 1993 at 14MY2336 in Montgomery County. The investigations were completed by Kansas Historical Society archeologists and crew for a road widening and bridge replacement for the Kansas Department of Transportation. The site produced a radiocarbon date of 710 - 850 CE in addition to a core, a hammerstone, pottery, a drill, scrapers, modified flakes, debitage, sandstone, bone fragments, mussel shell, and daub. Archeologists believed that the location, the time period, and the artifacts best fit a occupation by people of the Pomona phase.


Gorget from the Oliphant Site, 14LT316

Gorget from the Oliphant Site, 14LT316
Date: 700-1500 CE
This gorget was recovered from the Oliphant site in Labette County during excavations in 1973 by Kansas Historical Society archeologists. The gorget is made of polished shale with a hole drilled in one end. It probably represents less than half of the complete ornament. The gorget was recovered from a midden (refuse heap) outside a house. The Oliphant site was a Cuesta phase Pomona variant habitation site occupied during the Early and Middle Ceramic periods. Cuesta phase sites are the earliest sites in southeastern Kansas with recognizable remains of houses, pottery, and domesticated plants, including maize. They date from 800 to 1000 CE.


Pendant from the Oliphant Site, 14LT316

Pendant from the Oliphant Site, 14LT316
Date: 700-1500 CE
This pendant was recovered from the Oliphant site in Labette County during excavations in 1980 by Kansas Historical Society Archeologists. The pendant was recovered from a midden (refuse heap) at the site and is made of slate. It shows some polishing and shaping along the edges. The Oliphant site was a Cuesta phase Pomona variant habitation site occupied during the Early and Middle Ceramic periods. Cuesta phase sites are the earliest sites in southeastern Kansas with recognizable remains of houses, pottery, and domesticated plants, including maize. They date from 800 to 1000 CE.


Polyhedral Core from the Infinity Site, 14MY305

Polyhedral Core from the Infinity Site, 14MY305
Date: 2500 BCE-1600 CE
This polyhedral (conical) lithic core was recovered from the Infinity site in Montgomery County by Kansas Historical Society archeologists. Polyhedral cores, such as this one, are used specifically for the production of blades, long, narrow, thin flakes. The Infinity site is a multicomponent village site with five house structures, a midden and many other features. It was occupied from the late Archaic period through the Middle Ceramic period.


Projectile Points from 14MY316

Projectile Points from 14MY316
Date: 700-1500 CE
These 11 dart points were recovered from an archeological site along the Elk River in Montgomery County. All are made of Permian chert and seven were heat treated, a method to improve the knapping qualities of a chert which results in a pinkish color. Nine of the dart points are corner-notched, one has a contracting stem and another an expanding stem. The site had house remains and is considered to be part of the Pomona focus of the Early and Middle Ceramic period. Pomona focus sites are located in eastern Kansas and western Missouri.


Scrapers from the Infinity Site, 14MY305

Scrapers from the Infinity Site, 14MY305
Date: Unknown
These five scrapers were recovered from the Infinity site in Montgomery County by Kansas Historical Society archeologists. The scrapers would have likely been hafted on a handle and used to scrape hides. The scrapers would have required periodic resharpening. All of made of Permian chert, three of which (top row) have been heat-treated to improve the knapping qualities of the chert. The Infinity site is a multicomponent village site with five house structures, a midden and many other features. It was occupied from the late Archaic period through the Middle Ceramic period.


Showing 1 - 13

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