Kansas MemoryKansas Memory

Kansas Historical SocietyKansas Historical Society

-

Log In

Username:

Password:

After login, go to:

Register
Forgot Username?
Forgot Password?

Browse Users
Contact us

-

Martha Farnsworth

-

Podcast Archive

Governor Mike Hayden Interview
Details
Listen Now
Subscribe - iTunesSubscribe - RSS

More podcasts

-

Popular Item

Winter 1977, Volume 43, Number 4

-

Random Item

Karl Menninger, M.D. Karl Menninger, M.D.

-

Site Statistics

Total images: 735,254
Bookbag items: 39,858
Registered users: 12,168

-

About

Kansas Memory has been created by the Kansas State Historical Society to share its historical collections via the Internet. Read more.

-

Syndication

Matching items: 7

Category Filters

People - American Indians - Tribes - Plains Apache

Search within these results


       

Search Tips

Start Over | RSS Feed RSS Feed

View: Image Only | Title Only | Detailed
Sort by: TitleSort by Title, Ascending | Date | Creator | Newest

Showing 1 - 7 of 7 (results per page: 10 | 25 | 50)


Corn Cobs from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1

Corn Cobs from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1
Date: 1650-1750 CE
Shown are a few of the burned corn cob fragments that were recovered from the El Cuartelejo site in Scott County. The site, unique in Kansas, is the location of a seven room pueblo occupied by refugees from the Taos and Picuris pueblos in New Mexico in addition to Dismal River aspect groups (Apache). El Cuartelejo, also called the Scott County Pueblo, has been excavated and studied by many archeologists since 1898. These cobs were recovered during the 1976 Kansas Archeology Training Program. The cobs were identified as examples of both 10- and 16-rowed ears of corn. One cob still has burned kernels in place.


Dismal River Vessel from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1

Dismal River Vessel from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1
Date: 1575-1625 CE
This Dismal River pottery vessel was recovered from the El Cuartelejo site in Scott County. The micaeous (mica in the clay) pot was reconstructed from many individual sherds, with the spaces filled in with plaster. It stands 16 cm high. The El Cuartelejo site is the only known Plains Apache Pueblo in the Kansas and is further east than any other Pueblo.


Dismal River Vessel from El Cuarteljo, 14SC1

Dismal River Vessel from El Cuarteljo, 14SC1
Date: 1675-1725 CE
This Dismal River pottery vessel was recovered from the El Cuartelejo site in Scott County. The micaeous (mica in clay) pot was reconstructed from many individual sherds, with the spaces filled in with plaster. The El Cuartelejo site is the only known Plains Apache Pueblo in the Kansas and is further east than any other Pueblo.


Geronimo

Geronimo
Date: Between January 01, 1900 and December 31, 1909
Geronimo, third from the left, seated with George T. Barr, Mettie Rebecca Barr, and other unidentified people. Geronimo was a significant leader of the Chiricahua Apache who fought against the United States military's advance on his tribal lands and people.


Pipe Blank from the Wells Site, 14BT404

Pipe Blank from the Wells Site, 14BT404
Date: 1675-1725 CE
This stone pipe blank was recovered in 1965 during excavation by amateur archeologists of the Wells site in Barton County. It was donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 2007. The pipe's exterior had been shaped and the pipe bowl drilling had begun before the pipe was set aside. The walls of two excavated pits at the site were heavily burned to a bright orange hue indicating they were used as roasting pits. These pits are typical of the Dismal River aspect (Plains Apache) during the Late Prehistoric/Protohistoric period.


Pottery from the Wells Site, 14BT404

Pottery from the Wells Site, 14BT404
Date: 1675-1725 CE
These three pottery sherds were recovered in 1965 during excavation by amateur archeologists of the Wells site in Barton County. They were donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 2007. The left bowl rim sherd is decorated with small punctates on the lip. The center rim sherd has punctates on the lip with fingernail impressions below. The right rim sherd has triangular punctates below finger pinching parallel to the rim. The sherds are sand tempered. The walls of two excavated pits at the site were heavily burned to a bright orange hue indicating they were used as roasting pits. These pits are typical of the Dismal River aspect (Plains Apache) during the Late Prehistoric/Protohistoric period.


Pottery from the Wells Site, 14BT404

Pottery from the Wells Site, 14BT404
Date: 1675-1725 CE
These four rims sherds were recovered in 1965 during excavation by amateur archeologists of the Wells site in Barton County. They were donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 2007. All of the sherds are tall and undecorated. Two sherds have been reconstructed with another sherd. The walls of two excavated pits at the site were heavily burned to a bright orange hue indicating they were used as roasting pits. These pits are typical of the Dismal River aspect (Plains Apache) during the Late Prehistoric/Protohistoric period.


Showing 1 - 7

Copyright © 2007-2021 - Kansas Historical Society - Contact Us
This website was developed in part with funding provided by the Information Network of Kansas.