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Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Company's union depot and office building, Galveston, Texas

Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Company's union depot and office building, Galveston, Texas
Creator: Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railway Company
Date: Between 1914 and 1921
This black and white photograph shows the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Company's union depot and general office building in Galveston, Texas. The eight-story terra cotta and brick building was erected in 1914. In the background is the old red brick Union Depot and Office building built in 1876.


Capper building, Topeka, KS

Capper building, Topeka, KS
Date: Between 1920 and 1929
This colored postcard shows Capper Publications and its founder Arthur Capper. Located at Eighth and Jackson Streets in Topeka, Kansas, the building was made of Bedford stone, terra cotta and reinforced concrete. It housed Capper Publications which published a number of newspapers including the "Farmers Mail and Breeze" and the "Topeka Daily Capital."


Capper building, Topeka, KS

Capper building, Topeka, KS
Creator: Dougherty's, Topeka, Kansas
Date: Between 1920 and 1929
This sepia colored postcard shows the Capper building located at Eighth and Jackson Streets in Topeka, Kansas. The building of Bedford stone, terra cotta and reinforced concrete, housed Capper Publications which published a number of newspapers including the "Farmers Mail and Breeze" and most notably "Topeka Daily Capital".


Capper building, Topeka, Kansas

Capper building, Topeka, Kansas
Creator: Capper, Arthur, 1865-1951
Date: Between 1920 and 1929
This colored postcard shows the Capper building located at Eighth and Jackson Streets in Topeka, Kansas. The building, made of Bedford stone, terra cotta, and reinforced concrete, housed Capper Publications which published a number of newspapers including the "Farmers Mail and Breeze" and the "Topeka Daily Capital".


Erasmus Bennet home, Topeka, Kansas

Erasmus Bennet home, Topeka, Kansas
Creator: North American Post Card Co.
Date: Between 1900 and 1909
This sepia-colored photograph shows the Bennett home at the corner of Eighth and Buchanan Streets in Topeka, Kansas. Designed by architect Seymour Davis, the home was built between 1886 and 1888 for Erasmus Bennett, a breeder and importer of registered draft horses. The two-story, red brick structure trimmed in terra cotta, had a hint of a Tudor style with the tall towers and turrets. The Bennett Family lived in this beautifully designed and orate home until 1901, when the state of Kansas purchased the residence for $26,000 for a governor's mansion. As governors came and went, changes in décor were made to the home. The only major structural change to the mansion was the addition of a sleeping porch built on to the rear. In 1910, Governor W. R. Stubbs had the red bricks painted yellow but later they were painted white and remained so for the life of the house. As the years passed efforts continued to be made toward the upkeep of the mansion, but it would not be enough to keep ahead of the rapid deterioration. On January 28, 1962, the last official function, a pre-Kansas Day reception, was held at the governor's mansion and by January of 1965, the home was demolished.


Erasmus Bennett home, Topeka, Kansas

Erasmus Bennett home, Topeka, Kansas
Date: Between 1950s and 1960s
This black and white photograph shows the Bennett home at the corner of Eighth and Buchanan Streets in Topeka, Kansas. Designed by architect Seymour Davis, the home was built between 1886 and 1888 for Erasmus Bennett, a breeder and importer of registered draft horses. The two-story, red brick structure trimmed in terra cotta, had a hint of a Tudor style with tall towers and turrets. The Bennett family lived in this beautifully designed and ornate home until 1901, when the state of Kansas purchased the residence for $26,000 for a governor's mansion. As governors came and went, changes in décor were made to the home. The only major structural change to the mansion, was the addition of a sleeping porch built on to the rear. In 1910, Governor W.R. Stubbs had the red bricks painted yellow, but later they were painted white and remained so for the life of the house. As the years passed, efforts continued to be made toward the upkeep of the mansion, but it would not be enough to keep ahead of the rapid deterioration. On January 28, 1962, the last official function, a pre-Kansas Day reception, was held at the governor's mansion and by January 1965, the home was demolished.


Erasmus Bennett home, Topeka, Kansas

Erasmus Bennett home, Topeka, Kansas
Date: Between 1888 and 1910
This sepia colored photograph shows the Bennett home at the corner of Eighth and Buchanan Streets in Topeka, Kansas. Designed by architect Seymour Davis, the home was built between 1886 and 1888 for Erasmus Bennett, a breeder and importer of registered draft horses. The two-story red brick structure trimmed in terra cotta, had a hint of a Tudor style with the tall towers and turrets. The Bennett family lived in this ornate home until 1901, when the state of Kansas purchased the residence for $26,000 for a governor's mansion. As governors came and went, changes in decor were made to the home. The only major structural change to the mansion, was the addition of a sleeping porch built on to the rear. In 1910, Gov. W. R. Stubbs had the red bricks painted yellow but later they were painted white and remained so for the life of the house. As the years passed efforts continued to be made toward the upkeep of the mansion, but it would not be enough to keep ahead of the rapid deterioration. On January 28, 1962, the last official function, a pre-Kansas Day reception, was held at the governor's mansion and by January of 1965, the home was demolished.


Erasmus Bennett home, Topeka, Kansas

Erasmus Bennett home, Topeka, Kansas
Date: Between 1900 and 1909
This black and white postcard shows the Bennett home at the corner of Eighth and Buchanan Streets in Topeka, Kansas. Designed by architect Seymour Davis, the home was built between 1886 and 1888 for Erasmus Bennett, a breeder and importer of registered draft horses. The two-story red brick structure trimmed in terra cotta, had a hint of a Tudor style with the tall towers and turrets. The Bennett family lived in this ornate home until 1901, when the state of Kansas purchased the residence for $26,000 for a governor's mansion. As governors came and went, changes in decor were made to the home. The only major structural change to the mansion, was these addition of a sleeping porch built on to the rear. In 1910, Gov. W.R. Stubbs had the red bricks painted yellow but later they were painted white and remained so for the life of the house. As the years passed efforts continued to be made toward the upkeep of the mansion, but it would not be enough to keep ahead of the rapid deterioration. On January 28, 1962, the last official function, a pre-Kansas Day reception, was held at the governor's mansion and by January of 1965, the home was demolished.


Erasmus Bennett home, Topeka, Kansas

Erasmus Bennett home, Topeka, Kansas
Date: Between 1900 and 1909
This colored postcard shows the Bennett home at the corner of Eighth and Buchanan Streets in Topeka, Kansas. Designed by architect Seymour Davis, the home was built between 1886 and 1888 for Erasmus Bennett, a breeder and importer of registered draft horses. The two-story red brick structure trimmed in terra cotta, had a hint of a Tudor style with the tall towers and turrets. The Bennett family lived in this ornate home until 1901, when the state of Kansas purchased the residence for $26,000 for a governor's mansion. As governors came and went, changes in decorwere made to the home. The only major structural change to the mansion, was the addition of a sleeping porch built on to the rear. In 1910, Gov. W.R. Stubbs had the red bricks painted yellow but later they were painted white and remained so for the life of the house. As the years passed efforts continued to be made toward the upkeep of the mansion, but it would not be enough to keep ahead of the rapid deterioration. On January 28, 1962, the last official function, a pre-Kansas Day reception, was held at the governor's mansion and by January of 1965, the home was demolished.


Erasmus Bennett home, Topeka, Kansas

Erasmus Bennett home, Topeka, Kansas
Creator: Hall Stationery Co., Topeka, KS
Date: Between 1900 and 1909
This colored postcard shows the Bennett home at the corner of Eighth and Buchanan Streets in Topeka, Kansas. Designed by architect Seymour Davis, the home was built between 1886 and 1888 for Erasmus Bennett, a breeder and importer of registered draft horses. The two-story red brick structure trimmed in terra cotta had a hint of a Tudor style with the tall towers and turrets. The Bennett family lived in this ornate home until 1901, when the state of Kansas purchased the residence for $26,000 for a governor's mansion. As governors came and went, changes in decor were made to the home. The only major structural change to the mansion, was the addition of a sleeping porch built on to the rear. In 1910, Gov. W.R. Stubbs had the red bricks painted yellow but later they were painted white and remained so for the life of the house. As the years passed efforts continued to be made toward the upkeep of the mansion, but it would not be enough to keep ahead of the rapid deterioration. On January 28, 1962, the last official function, a pre-Kansas Day reception, was held at the governor's mansion and by January of 1965, the home was demolished.


Erasmus Bennett home, Topeka, Kansas

Erasmus Bennett home, Topeka, Kansas
Date: Between 1940s and 1960s
These two black and white photographs show the Bennett home at the corner of Eighth and Buchanan Streets in Topeka, Kansas. Designed by architect Seymour Davis, the home was built between 1886 and 1888 for Erasmus Bennett, a breeder and importer of registered draft horses. The two-story red brick structure trimmed in terra cotta had a hint of a Tudor style with the tall towers and turrets. The Bennett family lived in this beautifully designed and ornate home until 1901, when the state of Kansas purchased the residence for $26,000 for a governor's mansion. As governors came and went, changes in décor were made to the home. The only major structural change to the mansion, was the addition of a sleeping porch built onto the rear. In 1910, Governor W. R. Stubbs had the red bricks painted yellow but later they were painted white and remained so for the life of the house. As the years passed, efforts continued to be made toward the upkeep of the mansion, but it would not be enough to keep ahead of the rapid deterioration. On January 28, 1962, the last official function, a pre-Kansas Day reception, was held at the governor's mansion and by January of 1965 the home was demolished.


Erasmus Bennett home, Topeka, Kansas

Erasmus Bennett home, Topeka, Kansas
Creator: Topeka Capital
Date: 1903
This black and white postcard shows a view of the Bennett home at the corner of Eighth and Buchanan Streets in Topeka, Kansas. Designed by architect Seymour Davis, the home was built between 1886 and 1888 for Erasmus Bennett, a breeder and importer of registered draft horses. The two-story red brick structure trimmed in terra cotta, had a hint of a Tudor style with tall towers and turrets. The Bennett family lived in this ornate home until 1901, when the state of Kansas purchased the residence for $26,000 for a governor's mansion. As governors came and went, changes in decor were made to the home. The only major structural change to the mansion, was the addition of a sleeping porch built on to the rear. In 1910, Governor W.R. Stubbs had the red bricks painted yellow but later they were painted white and remained so for the life of the house. As the years passed, efforts continued to be made toward the upkeep of the mansion, but it would not be enough to keep ahead of the rapid deterioration. On January 28, 1962, the last official function, a pre-Kansas Day reception, was held at the governor's mansion and by January of 1965 the home was demolished. Willis Bailey was Governor of Kansas when this photo was taken.


Erasmus Bennett home, Topeka, Kansas

Erasmus Bennett home, Topeka, Kansas
Creator: Strickrott, John F.
Date: 1903
This sepia colored photograph shows Governor Willis Joshua Bailey and wife Ida standing on the steps of the Bennett home at the corner of Eighth and Buchanan Streets in Topeka, Kansas. Designed by architect Seymour Davis, the home was built between 1886 and 1888 for Erasmus Bennett, a breeder and importer of registered draft horses. The two-story red brick structure trimmed in terra cotta had a hint of a Tudor style with the tall towers and turrets. The Bennett family lived in this ornate home until 1901, when the state of Kansas purchased the residence for $26,000 for a governor's mansion. As governors came and went, changes in décor were made to the home. The only major structural change to the mansion, was the addition of a sleeping porch built on to the rear. In 1910, Governor W.R. Stubbs had the red bricks painted yellow but later they were painted white and remained so for the life of the house. As the years passed efforts continued to be made toward the upkeep of the mansion, but it would not be enough to keep ahead of the rapid deterioration. On January 28, 1962 the last official function, a pre-Kansas Day reception, was held at the governor's mansion and by January of 1965, the home was demolished. Willis Bailey was the governor of Kansas when this photo was taken in 1903.


Erasmus Bennett home, Topeka, Kansas

Erasmus Bennett home, Topeka, Kansas
Date: 1903
This sepia colored photograph shows the Bennett home at the corner of Eighth and Buchanan Streets in Topeka, Kansas. Designed by architect Seymour Davis, the home was built between 1886 and 1888 for Erasmus Bennett, a breeder and importer of registered draft horses. The two-story red brick structure trimmed in terra cotta, had a hint of a Tudor style with the tall towers and turrets. The Bennett family lived in this ornate home until 1901, when the state of Kansas purchased the residence for $26,000 for a governor's mansion. As governors came and went, changes in decor were made to the home. The only major structural change to the mansion, was the addition of a sleeping porch built on to the rear. In 1910, Governor W.R. Stubbs had the red bricks painted yellow but later they were pained white and remained so for the life of the house. As the years passed efforts continued to be made toward the upkeep of the mansion, but it would not be enough to keep ahead of the rapid deterioration. On January 28, 1962 the last official function, a pre-Kansas Day reception, was held at the governor's mansion and by January of 1965, the home was demolished. Willis Bailey was Governor of Kansas when this photo was taken.


Erasmus Bennett home, Topeka, Kansas

Erasmus Bennett home, Topeka, Kansas
Date: Between 1900 and 1910
This sepia colored photograph shows the Bennett home at the corner of Eighth and Buchanan Streets in Topeka, Kansas. Designed by architect Seymour Davis, the home was built between 1886 and 1888 for Erasmus Bennett, a breeder and importer of registered draft horses. The two-story red brick structure trimmed in terra cotta, had a hint of a Tudor style with the tall towers and turrets. The Bennett family lived in this beautifully designed and ornate home until 1901, when the state of Kansas purchased the residence for $26,000 for a governor's mansion. As governors came and went, changes in décor were made to the home. The only major structural change to the mansion, was the addition of a sleeping porch built on to the rear. In 1910, Gov. W. R. Stubbs had the red bricks painted yellow but later they were painted white and remained so for the life of the house. As the years passed efforts continued to be made toward the upkeep of the mansion, but it would not be enough to keep ahead of the rapid deterioration. On January 28, 1962, the last official function a pre-Kansas Day reception, was held at the governor's mansion and by January of 1965, the home was demolished.


Erasmus Bennett home, Topeka, Kansas

Erasmus Bennett home, Topeka, Kansas
Date: March 23, 1964
This black and white photograph shows the Bennett home at the corner of Eighth and Buchanan Streets in Topeka, Kansas. Designed by architect Seymour Davis, the home was built between 1886 and 1888 for Erasmus Bennett, a breeder and importer of registered draft horses. The two-story red brick structure trimmed in terra cotta, had a hint of a Tudor style with the tall towers and turrets. The Bennett family lived in this beautifully designed and ornate home until 1910, when the state of Kansas purchased the residence for $26,000 for a governor's mansion. As governors came and went, changes in décor were made to the home. The only major structural change to the mansion, was the addition of a sleeping porch built on to the rear. In 1910, Gov. W.R. Stubbs had the red bricks painted yellow but latter they were painted white and remained so for the life of the house. As the years passed efforts continued to be made toward the upkeep of the mansion, but it would not be enough to keep ahead of the rapid deterioration. On January 28, 1962, the last official function a pre-Kansas Day reception was held at the governor's mansion and by January of 1965, the home was demolished.


Erasmus Bennett home, Topeka, Kansas

Erasmus Bennett home, Topeka, Kansas
Date: Between 1950s and 1960s
This black and white photograph shows the Bennett home at the corner of Eighth and Buchanan Streets in Topeka, Kansas. Designed by architect Seymour Davis, the home was built between 1886 and 1888 for Erasmus Bennett, a breeder and importer of registered draft horses. The two-story red brick structure trimmed in terra cotta, had a hint of a Tudor style with the tall towers and turrets. The Bennett family lived in this beautifully designed and ornate home until 1901, when the state of Kansas purchased the residence for $26,000 for a governor's mansion. As governors came and went, changes in décor were made to the home. The only major structural change to the mansion was the addition of a sleeping porch built on the rear. In 1910, Gov. W. R. Stubbs had the red bricks painted yellow but later they were painted white and remained so for the life of the house. As the years passed efforts continued to be made toward the upkeep of the mansion, but it would not be enough to keep ahead of the rapid deterioration. On January 28, 1962, the last official function a pre-Kansas Day reception, was held at the governor's mansion and by January of 1965 the home was demolished.


Erasmus Bennett home, Topeka, Kansas

Erasmus Bennett home, Topeka, Kansas
Date: Between 1890 and 1910
This sepia colored photograph shows the Bennett home at the corner of Eighth and Buchanan Streets in Topeka, Kansas. Designed by architect Seymour Davis, the home was built between 1886 and 1888 for Erasmus Bennett, a breeder and importer of registered draft horses. The two-story red brick structure, trimmed in terra cotta, had a hint of a Tudor style with the tall towers and turrets. The Bennett family lived in this beautifully designed and ornate home until 1901, when the state of Kansas purchased the residence for $26,000 for a governor's mansion. As governors came and went, changes in decor were made to the home. The only major structural change to the mansion was the addition of a sleeping porch built on the rear. In 1910, Gov. W. R. Stubbs had the red brick painted yellow but later it was painted white and remained so for the life of the house. As the years passed, efforts continued to be made toward the upkeep of the mansion, but it would not be enough to keep ahead of the rapid deterioration. On January 28, 1962, the last official function, a pre-Kansas Day reception, was held at the governor's mansion and by January of 1965 the home was demolished.


Erasmus Bennett home, Topeka, Kansas

Erasmus Bennett home, Topeka, Kansas
Creator: Zercher Post Card Co.
Date: Between 1900 and 1919
This colored postcard shows the Bennett home at the corner of Eighth and Buchanan Streets in Topeka, Kansas. Designed by architect Seymour Davis, the home was built between 1886 and 1888 for Erasmus Bennett, a breeder and importer of registered draft horses. The two-story, red brick structure trimmed in terra cotta, had a hint of a Tudor style with tall towers and turrets. The Bennett family lived in this beautifully designed and ornate home until 1901, when the state of Kansas purchased the residence for $26,000 for a governor's mansion. As governors came and went, changes in décor were made to the home. The only major structural change to the mansion, was the addition of a sleeping porch built on to the rear. In 1910, Governor W.R. Stubbs had the red bricks painted yellow, but later they were painted white and remained so for the life of the house. As the years passed, efforts continued to be made toward the upkeep of the mansion, but it would not be enough to keep ahead of the rapid deterioration. On January 28, 1962, the last official function, a pre-Kansas Day reception, was held at the governor's mansion and by January 1965, the home was demolished.


La Posada Hotel, Winslow, Arizona

La Posada Hotel, Winslow, Arizona
Creator: Martin, William Lloyd
Date: April 18, 2009
These five photographs show the La Posada Hotel in Winslow, Arizona. The Mission-Spanish Colonial style hotel was built in 1929 for the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway. The La Posada opened in 1930. Today, the facility has been refurbished and reopened as a historical hotel. In 1992 the building was added to the National Register of Historic Places .


Missouri Pacific Railroad depot, Yates Center, Kansas

Missouri Pacific Railroad depot, Yates Center, Kansas
Date: 1967
This photograph shows the Missouri Pacific Railroad depot in Yates Center, Kansas. The one-story brick building with a pantile covered roof no longer stands.


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