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Abraham Burnett's log cabin, Topeka, Kansas

Abraham Burnett's log cabin, Topeka, Kansas
Date: Between 1880 and 1890
This is a photograph of Abraham Burnett's log cabin located southwest of Topeka, Kansas.


August and Malinda Falk

August and Malinda Falk
Date: Between 1900 and 1905
Photograph of Malinda (Fix) Falk and August Falk seen in front of a small frame log house in Wabaunsee County, Kansas. The door on the log section at the right says Bicycle Shop.


Centennial cabin in Ottawa, Kansas

Centennial cabin in Ottawa, Kansas
Date: 1970s
Two postcard views of the centennial cabin in Ottawa, Kansas.


Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday
Creator: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: August 12, 1855
Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania of his journey to Kansas City to obtain a land warrant for Topeka and to attend the Free State Convention. Two of his articles had been published in The Herald of Freedom, a Lawrence newspaper, and he sent copies. Mentioning political difficulties, Holliday suggested that his wife wait until fall to travel to Kansas. He rented out his cabin in Topeka for profit. A deadly cholera epidemic at Fort Riley had ended.


First house built in Independence, Kansas

First house built in Independence, Kansas
Date: Between 1890 and 1895
Men posing with the first house built in Independence, Kansas. The house was built in 1869.


First house built in Lawrence, Kansas

First house built in Lawrence, Kansas
Creator: Lamon, W. H.
Date: between 1855 and 1858
The first house built in Lawrence, a log cabin, belonging to Clark Stearns (also known as Charles Stearns). It was located at 620 Massachusetts Street, Lawrence, Kansas.


First house in Topeka, Kansas

First house in Topeka, Kansas
Creator: Leonard & Martin
Date: 1854
This is a cabinet card showing a painting by Henry Worrall of the first house (log cabin) in Topeka, Kansas Territory. In the winter of 1854-1855 this log cabin was the only building in Topeka. Nine pioneers lived in it and a large tent. The cabin served its purpose of housing the first citizens of the town until they could claim or buy land of their own and build more substantial dwellings. The roof of the cabin was originally thatched but it burned one night and the occupants barely escaped with their lives. The cabin was possibly razed in 1855 or 1856.


Fortified cabin built by John Brown, Linn County, Kansas

Fortified cabin built by John Brown, Linn County, Kansas
Date: Between 1950 and 1970
This is an artist's rendering of a fortified cabin built by John Brown at the site of the Marais des Cygnes Massacre. On May 19, 1858, proslavery supporters killed five and wounded five free-state supporters in a ravine near Trading Post, Kansas in Linn County. The massacre, which followed earlier guerrilla warfare activities on both sides, shocked the nation and became a pivotal event in the "Bleeding Kansas" era. In late June 1858, abolitionist John Brown constructed a fortified cabin, illustrated here, at the site of the massacre. The fort was reported to have been two stories high, walled up with logs and with a flat roof. Water from a spring ran through the house and into a pit at the southwest corner. Although the fort no longer stands, the site is listed as a National Historic Landmark administered by the Kansas Historical Society.


Ft. Scott log cabin

Ft. Scott log cabin
Date: Between 1854 and 1860
Pioneer log cabin house located at Ft. Scott, Kansas.


George Walter, History of Kanzas

George Walter, History of Kanzas
Creator: Walter, George
Date: 1855
This history was written by George Walter, agent for the New York Kanzas League. The purpose of the League was to assist individuals and families to emigrate to Kansas and help provides reduced prices and other assistance. The office of the New York Kanzas League was located on the 3rd floor of No. 110 Broadway, New York City. Walter provided the information he thought emigrants to Kansas would need including descriptions of the situation in the territory, its climate, soil, rivers, and native products. He also gave information about industry in Kansas Territory, particularly the milling industry. He provided information on routes and supplies needed as well as a copy of the reemption law. The text of the Bill to organize the territories of Kansas and Nebraska was included on pages 24 through 48 of the pamphlet.


Group with tame elk at ranch on Clear Creek Kansas.

Group with tame elk at ranch on Clear Creek Kansas.
Creator: Gardner, Alexander, 1821-1882
Date: 1867
This stereograph shows unidentified adults and children with a tame elk posed in front of a log building at Clear Creek, Kansas. It is from Alexander Gardner's series, Across the Continent on the Union Pacific Railway, Eastern Division.


Group with tame elk at ranch on Clear Creek, Kansas. 498 miles west of St. Louis Mo.

Group with tame elk at ranch on Clear Creek, Kansas. 498 miles west of St. Louis Mo.
Creator: Gardner, Alexander, 1821-1882
Date: 1867
THis stereograph shows unidentified adults and children posed with an elk by a log building on a ranch at Clear Creek, Kansas. It is from Alexander Gardner's series, Across the Continent on the Union Pacific Railway, Eastern Division.


Highley log cabin near Neodesha, Wilson County, Kansas

Highley log cabin near Neodesha, Wilson County, Kansas
Date: Between 1866 and 1900
This is a photograph of the Highley log cabin which was built one mile northeast of Neodesha, Wilson County, Kansas, in 1866.


House on the Pemberton ranch in Rush County, Kansas

House on the Pemberton ranch in Rush County, Kansas
Creator: Wittick, George B.
Date: Between 1880 and 1889
This is a stereograph showing a sod and log house on the Pemberton ranch in Rush County, Kansas. The ranch was located on Walnut Creek.


Humbargar log cabin, Saline County, Kansas

Humbargar log cabin, Saline County, Kansas
Date: Between 1866 and 1890
Humbargar log cabin with attached grain storage, Saline County, Kansas. The cabin was built in 1866.


Humbargar log cabin, Saline County, Kansas

Humbargar log cabin, Saline County, Kansas
Date: between 1866 and 1890
Humbargar family members standing outside of their log cabin, Saline County, Kansas.


J.W. Honey to George W. Martin

J.W. Honey to George W. Martin
Creator: Honey, J.W.
Date: February 03, 1910
This is a letter from J.W. Honey to George W. Martin, Secretary of the Kansas State Historical Society. Honey writes of his experiences during the grasshopper invasion of 1874, focusing mostly on bringing corn in from the field before it was fully consumed by the insects.


John Edmund Yard seated on the porch of his quarters at Camp Supply, Indian Territory

John Edmund Yard seated on the porch of his quarters at Camp Supply, Indian Territory
Date: Between 1886 and 1887
A photograph showing a log building at Camp Supply, Indian Territory. The officer seated on the porch is Col. John Edmond Yard, who was later commander at Fort Hays, Kansas.


John James Ingalls to Elias T. Ingalls

John James Ingalls to Elias T. Ingalls
Creator: Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900
Date: October 5, 1858
On his first full day in Sumner, Kansas Territory, Ingalls penned a second letter to his father to convey his first impressions of "that Promised Land." The reality Ingalls found and described was quite different than what was depicted in "the lithographic fiction" he had been shown back East. Other than the hotel, the "city" was composed of a "few log huts and miserable cabins . . . None of the premises are fenced," wrote Ingalls, "the whole place being open to the incursions of dogs and pigs which exist in large numbers and seem in fact to constitute the greater amount of the population." Virtually everything about the place distressed Ingalls, who was "quite unable to convey to you any definite idea of the disappointment, not unmingled with anger and mortification, with which I contemplate the State of affairs here."


John Link cabin, Marshall County, Kansas

John Link cabin, Marshall County, Kansas
Date: 1898
This black and white photograph shows John Link with his family in front of their log cabin in Marshall County, Kansas. The home was located at the SE 1/4 Sec. 20 T. 4S, R6 E


John W. Hoss log cabin, Chetopa Creek, Wilson County, Kansas

John W. Hoss log cabin, Chetopa Creek, Wilson County, Kansas
Date: 1902
This is a photograph of thirteen men, women and children in front of the John W. Hoss log cabin, built in 1875 on Chetopa Creek, in Wilson County, Kansas.


Joseph Harrington Trego to Alice Trego

Joseph Harrington Trego to Alice Trego
Creator: Trego, Joseph H. (Joseph Harrington), 1823-1905
Date: December 5, 1857
Joseph Trego wrote from Sugar Mound, Kansas Territory, to his wife, Alice, in Illinois. Trego described the furnishings and atmosphere in their "Bachelor's Hall" of a cabin. As he greatly missed them, Trego was eager to receive his family's daguerreotypes by mail; he also spoke at length about both business and domestic matters at home. His friend Ell (Thomas Ellwood Smith) prepared to embark on a trip to St. Louis to purchase a corn mill, which they hoped would translate into a business enterprise that would sustain the three of them.


Joseph Harrington Trego to Alice Trego

Joseph Harrington Trego to Alice Trego
Creator: Trego, Joseph H. (Joseph Harrington), 1823-1905
Date: October 16, 1857
Joseph H. Trego wrote from his cabin in Sugar Mound, Kansas Territory, to his wife Alice in Rock Island, Illinois, about his journey from Kansas City to Sugar Mound. His friends, Thomas Ellwood Smith (Ell) and his brother Edwin (Ed), and himself were poorly prepared as they expected to stay in public houses during the journey, not camp outside as their wagon transportation preferred. As the road they took went right down the Missouri state line, Trego contrasted the well-established farms to the East with the "open, wild prairie" to the West. He and his brother, upon arriving at their cabin, found that they had "Hoosier" neighbors (from Indiana), who were pleasant but proslavery. Trego recounted the difficulty they had acquiring home furnishings and food, fighting adverse weather at every turn. He spoke at length of how he was comforted by writing to his wife, as he and his friends greatly missed their families.


Joseph Harrington Trego to Alice Trego

Joseph Harrington Trego to Alice Trego
Creator: Trego, Joseph H. (Joseph Harrington), 1823-1905
Date: October 25, 1857
Joseph Trego wrote from his log cabin near Sugar Mound, Kansas Territory, to his wife, Alice, in Illinois. Trego described the beauty of the fall foliage and his plans to build a new home for his family, whom he greatly missed. He worried that he had heard from Alice only once in seven weeks, while he had written every week. Trego showed that he was well connected to current events in the Territory and the county, as he and his friends took several newspapers, including two from Lawrence.


Julia Hardy Lovejoy's diary

Julia Hardy Lovejoy's diary
Creator: Lovejoy, Julia Hardy, 1812-1882
Date: December 10, 1854 through January 5, 1860
Julia Louisa Hardy Lovejoy and her husband, Charles Lovejoy, came to the Kansas Territory in March, 1855. Lovejoy described the trip and their first months in Kansas Territory in her diary. The diary entries were fairly sporadic, however, so there were significant gaps in her account of life in the Kansas Territory. Lovejoy's writing was very emotional when describing the illness and death of their daughter Edith, when referring to the conflict in the territory, and when writing about her religious beliefs. The diary also contained some descriptions of Lovejoy's daily life. The Lovejoys had two older children (Charles J. and Juliette) and a five year old daughter, Edith, when they came to Kansas Territory. Their son Charles may have come to Kansas before the rest of the family. Edith died in Lawrence, Kansas Territory, on May 3, 1855. Julia was pregnant at the time and a son Irving was born September 17, 1855. Juliette married Dr. Samuel Whitehorn from Hudson, Michigan, on March 9, 1856, in Manhattan, Kansas Territory. Juliette died November 20, 1860, at Manhattan, Kansas, at the age of 21. See the biographical sketch in the "Personalities" section for more information about the Lovejoys.


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