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A. B. Hunt's garage, Liberal, Kansas

A. B. Hunt's garage, Liberal, Kansas
Date: Between 1920 and 1945
This photograph shows A. B. Hunt's Ford dealership and auto repair garage and employees in Liberal, Kansas. It is a brick structure with some decorative work and plate glass windows. A group of people are standing in fromt of the building.


Abandoned house, Lane County, Kansas

Abandoned house, Lane County, Kansas
Date: Between 1980 and 1985
This photograph shows an abandoned frame house in Lane County, Kansas.


A boy on horseback, Greeley County, Kansas

A boy on horseback, Greeley County, Kansas
Date: Between 1920 and 1930
A boy sits on a horse in front of a sod building, Greeley County, Kansas.


Abraham Burnett's log cabin, Topeka, Kansas

Abraham Burnett's log cabin, Topeka, Kansas
Date: Between 1880 and 1890
This is a photograph of Abraham Burnett's log cabin located southwest of Topeka, Kansas.


Abraham Pratt dugout, south bank of Solomon River near Studley, Sheridan County, Kansas

Abraham Pratt dugout, south bank of Solomon River near Studley, Sheridan County, Kansas
Date: 1889
A view of Abraham Pratt's dugout along the south bank of the Solomon River south east of the depot in Studley, Sheridan County, Kansas. Pratt, his sons and several other men lived here when they first came to Sheridan County from Yorkshire, England prior to 1885.


Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Date: Between 1900 and 1919
This stereograph shows Emma Florilla Adair Remington and her two daughters Ada and Jessie in front of the Adair-Brown cabin before it was moved to the John Brown Memorial Park in Osawatomie, Kansas. The structure, built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn, was sold in 1855 to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free-state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical Society to maintain the site. In 1971, it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Date: Between 1890 and 1909
This sepia-colored photograph shows the Adair-Brown cabin in Osawatomie, Kansas. The structure, built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn, was sold in 1855 to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free-state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical Society to maintain the site. In 1971, it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Date: Between 1900 and 1912
These two postcards show a view of the Adair-Brown cabin in Osawatomie, Kansas. The structure, built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn, was sold in 1855 to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free-state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical Society to maintain the site. In 1971, it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Date: Between 1912 and 1928
This sepia-colored postcard shows a view of the caretakers cottage (on left) and the Adair-Brown cabin in Osawatomie, Kansas. The structure, built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn, was later sold in 1855 to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free-state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia men. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical Society to maintain the site and in 1971 it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Creator: Walker, Russell W.
Date: Between 1928 and 1959
This black and white photograph shows the Adair-Brown cabin at the John Brown Memorial Park in Osawatomie, Kansas. The structure built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn was later sold ,in 1855, to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical society to maintain the site and in 1971 it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Date: Between 1900 and 1912
This sepia-colored postcard shows the backside of the Adair-Brown cabin in Osawatomie, Kansas. The structure, built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn, was sold in 1855 to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free-state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical Society to maintain the site. In 1971, it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Date: Between 1912 and 1928
This sepia-colored postcard shows a view of the Adair-Brown cabin in Osawatomie, Kansas. The structure, built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn, was later sold in 1855 to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free-state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia men. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical Society to maintain the site and in 1971 it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Date: Between 1880 and 1912
This sepia-colored photograph shows the Adair-Brown cabin in Osawatomie, Kansas. The structure, built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn, was sold in 1855 to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free-state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical Society to maintain the site. In 1971, it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Date: Between 1880 and 1912
These two sepia-colored photographs show the Adair-Brown cabin in Osawatomie, Kansas. The structure, built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn, was sold in 1855 to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free-state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical Society to maintain the site. In 1971, it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Date: Between 1912 and 1928
These two postcards show a view of the Adair-Brown cabin in Osawatomie, Kansas. The structure, built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn, was later sold in 1855 to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free-state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia men. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical Society to maintain the site and in 1971 it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Creator: Bloom Bros. Co., Minneapolis, Minn
Date: Between 1912 and 1927
This postcard shows the Adair-Brown cabin in Osawatomie, Kansas. The structure, built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn, was later sold in 1855 to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free-state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia men. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical Society to maintain the site and in 1971 it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Date: Between 1880 and 1912
This illustration shows the Adair-Brown cabin in Osawatomie, Kansas. The structure, built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn, was sold in 1855 to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free-state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical Society to maintain the site. In 1971, it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Date: Between 1900 and 1912
This colored postcard shows the Adair-Brown cabin in Osawatomie, Kansas. The structure, built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn, was sold in 1855 to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free-state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical Society to maintain the site. In 1971, it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Date: 1900
This black and white photograph, copied from the Album Souvenir Letter: Osawatomie, Kansas by Jones Studio, shows the Adair-Brown cabin and an insert of the 1877 Soldiers Monument to honor the men killed in the "Battle of Osawatomie". The cabin, built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn, was sold in 1855 to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free-state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical Society to maintain the site. In 1971, it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Date: Between 1911 and 1912
This postcard shows a group of men dismantling the Adair-Brown cabin in Osawatomie, Kansas. The structure, built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn, was sold in 1855 to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free-state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical Society to maintain the site. In 1971, it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Creator: Uhls, Bessie B.
Date: Between 1880s and 1912s
This colored postcard shows the Adair-Brown cabin in Osawatomie, Kansas. The structure, built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn, was sold in 1855 to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free-state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical Society to maintain the site. In 1971, it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Adair Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Date: Between 1928 and 1965
This black and white photograph shows the Adair-Brown cabin at the John Brown Memorial Park in Osawatomie, Kansas. The structure built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn was sold, in 1855, to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free-state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical Society to maintain the site and in 1971 it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Address before the Old Settler's Reunion, Lincoln, Kansas

Address before the Old Settler's Reunion, Lincoln, Kansas
Creator: Stanley, Arthur Jehu, 1874-1967
Date: September 17, 1915
An address given by Arthur Stanley before the Old Settler's Reunion in Lincoln, Kansas. Stanley recounts life in Lincoln, of living in a dugout, the fear of prairie fires, prairie schooners passing through, the naming and meaning of places in Lincoln, and many other stories of the county and prairie life in general.


Adobe church

Adobe church
Date: Between 1880s and 1890s
This photograph shows a group of men possible repairing an unidentified adobe church. In the foreground a short adobe wall is visible. While in the background other adobe dwellings and a rolling hillside are visible on the horizon.


Adobe house in Sharon Springs, Kansas

Adobe house in Sharon Springs, Kansas
Date: Between 1950 and 1955
This is a photograph of an adobe house located near Sharon Springs, Kansas. The people in the photograph are (left to right) Eleanor Graham, who was born in the house, Darlene Graham and Charles Graham, the children of Elmer David Graham and Alice Steele Graham.


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