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314 Sanitary Train band at Camp Funston

314 Sanitary Train band at Camp Funston
Date: Between 1917 and 1919
This is a postcard showing the 314 Sanitary Train band at Camp Funston. The photograph was possibly taken during World War I.


60th Field Artillery Brigade at Camp Whiteside

60th Field Artillery Brigade at Camp Whiteside
Creator: Holt, O. W.
Date: November 9, 1926
This is a panoramic photograph showing the 60th Field Artillery Brigade at Camp Whiteside, Fort Riley, Kansas.


60th Field Artillery Brigade at Camp Whitside

60th Field Artillery Brigade at Camp Whitside
Date: November 27, 1928
This is a panoramic photograph showing the 60th Field Artillery Brigade at Camp Whitside, Fort Riley, Kansas.


Aerial views of Fort Hays, Kansas

Aerial views of Fort Hays, Kansas
Creator: Kansas State Historical Society
Date: June 1992
Four aerial photographs of Fort Hays, Kansas. Fort Hays was an important U.S. Army post that was active from 1865 until 1889. Today four original buildings survive: the blockhouse (completed as the post headquarters in 1868), guardhouse, and two officers' quarters. After its closing in 1889 the land and buildings of Fort Hays were turned over to the Department of the Interior, which later transferred them to the state of Kansas in 1900. When Frontier Historical Park was opened at the site in 1929, only the blockhouse and guardhouse remained of the original fort buildings. The two officers' quarters had been sold at auction in 1902 and moved into town at the time the other buildings were being sold for scrap. The officers' quarters were relocated in 1964 and 1987. The visitor center was built in 1967. Today it operates as Fort Hays State Historic Site; it was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971.


Aerial views of Fort Hays, Kansas

Aerial views of Fort Hays, Kansas
Creator: Kansas State Historical Society
Date: June 1992
Several aerial views of Fort Hays, Kansas. Fort Hays was an important U.S. Army post that was active from 1865 until 1889. Today four original buildings survive: the blockhouse (completed as the post headquarters in 1868), guardhouse, and two officers' quarters. After its closing in 1889 the land and buildings of Fort Hays were turned over to the Department of the Interior, which later transferred them to the state of Kansas in 1900. When Frontier Historical Park was opened at the site in 1929, only the blockhouse and guardhouse remained of the original fort buildings. The two officers' quarters had been sold at auction in 1902 and moved into town at the time the other buildings were being sold for scrap. The officers' quarters were relocated in 1964 and 1987. The visitor center was built in 1967. Today it operates as Fort Hays State Historic Site; it was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971.


Archeological dig at Fort Hays, Kansas

Archeological dig at Fort Hays, Kansas
Date: 1966
Five photographs showing an archeological dig at Fort Hays, Kansas. Fort Hays was an important U.S. Army post that was active from 1865 until 1889. Originally designated Fort Fletcher (after Governor Thomas C. Fletcher of Missouri), it was located five miles south of present-day Walker and became operational on October 11, 1865. Troops stationed at Fort Fletcher were to protect the stage and freight wagons on the Butterfield Overland Dispatch (BOD) traveling along the Smoky Hill Trail to Denver. Despite the presence of the soldiers, Southern Cheyenne and Southern Arapaho Indians continued to confront traffic along the trail. David Butterfield, owner of the BOD, went bankrupt and the line was abandoned. Since the Smoky Hill Trail was no longer in use, Fort Fletcher was closed May 5, 1866. On October 11, 1866, Fort Fletcher was reopened approximately one-fourth mile north of its previous location, at the confluence of Big Creek and the North Fork of Big Creek. The Union Pacific Railway, Eastern Division, was being constructed westward roughly paralleling the Smoky Hill Trail and construction workers needed the protection of the U.S. Army. In November 1866 Fort Fletcher was renamed Fort Hays in honor of Brigadier General Alexander Hays, who was killed during the Civil War. Some of the famous figures associated with the fort included Wild Bill Hickok, Buffalo Bill Cody, General Nelson Miles, General Philip Sheridan, and Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer. It was also the home of several well-known Indian wars regiments such as the Seventh U.S. Cavalry, the Fifth U.S. Infantry, and the Tenth U.S. Cavalry, whose black troopers were better known as Buffalo Soldiers. After 25 years of service, Fort Hays was abandoned on November 8, 1889. Today four original buildings survive: the blockhouse (completed as the post headquarters in 1868), guardhouse, and two officers' quarters. After its closing in 1889 the land and buildings of Fort Hays were turned over to the Department of the Interior, which later transferred them to the state of Kansas in 1900. When Frontier Historical Park was opened at the site in 1929, only the blockhouse and guardhouse remained of the original fort buildings. The two officers' quarters had been sold at auction in 1902 and moved into town at the time the other buildings were being sold for scrap. The officers' quarters were relocated in 1964 and 1987. The visitor center was built in 1967. Today it operates as Fort Hays State Historic Site; it was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971.


Army Airfield, Pratt, Kansas

Army Airfield, Pratt, Kansas
Date: December 16, 1943
This black and white photograph shows the base operation tower at the Army Air Field in Pratt, Kansas. The facility housed and prepared members of the United States Army Air Force for overseas operations during World War II.


Army maneuvers at Camp William Gary Sanger, Fort Riley, Kansas

Army maneuvers at Camp William Gary Sanger, Fort Riley, Kansas
Creator: Pennell, Joseph Judd, 1866-1922
Date: October 1903
This is a view of tents at Camp William Gary Sanger, Fort Riley, Kansas.


Army troops marching at Fort Larned, Kansas

Army troops marching at Fort Larned, Kansas
Creator: Kansas. Centennial Commission
Date: June 18, 1961
A photograph showing troops marching at a Kansas centennial event at Fort Larned, Kansas.


Barracks, Smoky Hill Army Air Force Base, Salina, Kansas

Barracks, Smoky Hill Army Air Force Base, Salina, Kansas
Date: Between 1940 and 1950
This photograph shows a view of the barracks at the Smoky Hill Army Air Force Base in Salina, Kansas.


Barracks at Fort Dodge, Kansas

Barracks at Fort Dodge, Kansas
Date: Between January 01, 1865 and December 31, 1867
Fort Dodge was established in 1865 by Captain Henry Pierce, a member of the 11th Kansas Cavalry. The fort was located on the left bank of the Arkansas River on the "Long Route" of the Santa Fe Trail a few miles southeast of the present Dodge City. The fort was designed to protect the U.S. mail and emigrant wagon trains on the Santa Fe Trail.


Bird's eye view of Fort Leavenworth, Kansas

Bird's eye view of Fort Leavenworth, Kansas
Creator: United States Army, Department of Missouri
Date: 1881
This black and white (brown) lithograph of Fort Leavenworth was created by Wilhelm Dannmeier, an architect, engraver, and lithographer who was top assistant to the Chief Engineer, Department of Missouri, United States Army. The names of the various buildings and areas are identified in the lower margin below the location of the building. The structures are not directly identified with numbers of letters. The major buildings on the post are listed. The Missouri River is on the right side of the lithograph.


Blockhouse and guardhouse at Fort Hays, Kansas

Blockhouse and guardhouse at Fort Hays, Kansas
Date: Between 1890 and 1920
This postcard shows the old blockhouse and old guardhouse at Fort Hays, Kansas. Fort Hays was an important U.S. Army post that was active from 1865 until 1889. Originally designated Fort Fletcher (after Governor Thomas C. Fletcher of Missouri), it was located five miles south of present-day Walker and became operational on October 11, 1865. Troops stationed at Fort Fletcher were to protect the stage and freight wagons on the Butterfield Overland Dispatch (BOD) traveling along the Smoky Hill Trail to Denver. Despite the presence of the soldiers, Southern Cheyenne and Southern Arapaho Indians continued to confront traffic along the trail. David Butterfield, owner of the BOD, went bankrupt and the line was abandoned. Since the Smoky Hill Trail was no longer in use, Fort Fletcher was closed May 5, 1866. On October 11, 1866, Fort Fletcher was reopened approximately one-fourth mile north of its previous location, at the confluence of Big Creek and the North Fork of Big Creek. The Union Pacific Railway, Eastern Division, was being constructed westward roughly paralleling the Smoky Hill Trail and construction workers needed the protection of the U.S. Army. In November 1866, Fort Fletcher was renamed Fort Hays in honor of Brigadier General Alexander Hays, who was killed during the Civil War. Some of the famous figures associated with the fort included Wild Bill Hickok, Buffalo Bill Cody, General Nelson Miles, General Philip Sheridan, and Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer. It was also the home of several well-known Indian wars regiments such as the Seventh U.S. Cavalry, the Fifth U.S. Infantry, and the Tenth U.S. Cavalry, whose black troopers were better known as Buffalo Soldiers. After 25 years of service, Fort Hays was abandoned on November 8, 1889. Today four original buildings survive: the blockhouse (completed as the post headquarters in 1868), guardhouse, and two officers' quarters. After its closing, the land and buildings of Fort Hays were turned over to the Department of the Interior, which later transferred them to the state of Kansas in 1900. When Frontier Historical Park was opened at the site in 1929, only the blockhouse and guardhouse remained of the original fort buildings. The two officers' quarters had been sold at auction in 1902 and moved into town at the time the other buildings were being sold for scrap. The officers' quarters were relocated in 1964 and 1987. The visitor center was built in 1967. Today it operates as Fort Hays State Historic Site; it was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971.


C & D Battery Officers

C & D Battery Officers
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: 1917
Nine officers of Battery C and D of the 130th Field Artillery, Kansas National Guard, posing in front of an ivy covered brick building at Camp Doniphan. James Clark Hughes is fourth from the right. In 1917 James C. Hughes was Captain of Battery C, 130th Field Artillery, Kansas National Guard and stationed at Camp Doniphan, Oklahoma, where this photograph was taken. A full biography of James Clark Hughes is available on Kansapedia.


C & D Battery Officers

C & D Battery Officers
Creator: Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964
Date: 1917
Nine officers of Battery C and D of the 130th Field Artillery, Kansas National Guard, posing in front of an ivy covered brick building at Camp Doniphan. James Clark Hughes is fifth from the right. In 1917 James C. Hughes was Captain of Battery C, 130th Field Artillery, Kansas National Guard and stationed at Camp Doniphan, Oklahoma, where this photograph was taken. A full biography of James Clark Hughes is available on Kansapedia.


Camp Concordia, Cloud County, Kansas

Camp Concordia, Cloud County, Kansas
Date: Between 1943 and 1945
These five black and white photographs show Camp Concordia in Cloud County, Kansas. The facility was one of several camps built across Kansas during World War II to house German Prisoners of War.


Camp Doniphan from the southeast corner

Camp Doniphan from the southeast corner
Date: 1917
Panoramic view of Camp Doniphan from the southeast. The camp was located next to Fort Sill in Oklahoma.


Camp Funston, 14th National Army Cantonment, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, 14th National Army Cantonment, Fort Riley, Kansas
Creator: Williams, Verne O. & Stead, Chas A., K.C. Mo.
Date: 1917
This panoramic photograph shows a variety of structures at Camp Funston, which was established at Fort Riley, Kansas, after the outbreak of World War I and work began on the camp in the summer of 1917. The camp was named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston who grew up in Iola, Kansas, and who became well known for his role in the Philippines during the Spanish American War. The photograph was taken by Verne O. Williams and Charles A. Stead of Kansas City, Missouri. It is copyrighted 1917.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Date: Between 1917 and 1919
This black and white photograph shows the nurses' home at Camp Funston on the Ft. Riley military reservation near Junction City, Kansas. The facility named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp, were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Creator: Holt, O. W.
Date: Between 1917 and 1919
This panoramic photograph shows a variety of structures at Camp Funston, which was established at Fort Riley, Kansas, after the outbreak of World War I. Work began on the camp in the summer of 1917. The camp was named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston who grew up in Iola, Kansas, and who became well known for his role in the Philippines during the Spanish American War. The photograph was taken by O. W. Holt, Manhattan, Kansas.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Date: Between 1917 and 1919
This black and white photograph shows a mess hall at Camp Funston on the Ft. Riley military reservation near Junction City, Kansas. The facility, named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Creator: Baird Company Engravers
Date: Between 1917 and 1919
These two photographs show the mess hall and kitchen at Remount Station at Camp Funston on the Ft. Riley military reservation near Junction City, Kansas. The facility, named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Date: Between 1917 and 1919
These two interior views show the barracks at Camp Funston. The facility located on the Ft. Riley military reservation, named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The barracks were two-story wooden structures erected upon cement foundations with the capacity to house 200 to 250 men. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp, were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Date: Between 1917 and 1919
These five black and white photographs show construction at Camp Funston on the Ft. Riley military reservation near Junction City, Kansas. The facility, named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp, were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Creator: Pennell Photo
Date: 1917
This panoramic view shows Camp Funston on the Ft. Riley military reservation near Junction City, Kansas. The facility, named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


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