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Brick home Cheney, Kansas

Brick home Cheney, Kansas
Date: Between 1899 and 1920s
An exterior view of a two story home built in 1899 from native brick and owned by the Hillman family from Cheney in Sedwick, County.


Cramer family reunion, Allen County, Kansas

Cramer family reunion, Allen County, Kansas
Date: Between 1880 and 1920
A photograph showing the Cramer family reunion in Allen County, Kansas. The family is gathered on the porch with a side building slightly visible in the background.


David W. Mulvane home, Topeka, Kansas

David W. Mulvane home, Topeka, Kansas
Date: Between 1905 and 1938
This photograph shows the home of David Winfield Mulvane at Eleventh & Van Buren in Topeka, Kansas. The home was designed by Kansas City architect Louis Curtiss and served as a children's library from 1939 to the late 1950s. In 1961 the home was eventually torn down.


David W. Mulvane home, Topeka, Kansas

David W. Mulvane home, Topeka, Kansas
Date: Between 1905 and 1938
This photograph shows the home of David Winfield Mulvane at 11th & Van Buren in Topeka, Kansas. The home was designed by Kansas City architect Louis Curtiss and later served as a children's library from 1939 to the late 1950s. The home was demolished in 1961.


David W. Mulvane home, Topeka, Kansas

David W. Mulvane home, Topeka, Kansas
Date: Between 1905 and 1938
This photograph shows an interior view of the David Winfield Mulvane home at 11th & Van Buren in Topeka, Kansas. The home, designed by Kansas City architect Louis Curtiss also served as a children's library from 1939 through the late 1950s. The home was torn down in 1961.


David W. Mulvane home, Topeka, Kansas

David W. Mulvane home, Topeka, Kansas
Date: Between 1905 and 1938
This photograph shows an interior view of the David Winfield Mulvane home at Eleventh & Van Buren in Topeka, Kansas. The home was designed by Kansas City architect Louis Curtiss and served as a children's library from 1939 to the late 1950s. The home was torn down in 1961.


Erasmus Bennet home, Topeka, Kansas

Erasmus Bennet home, Topeka, Kansas
Creator: North American Post Card Co.
Date: Between 1900 and 1909
This sepia-colored photograph shows the Bennett home at the corner of Eighth and Buchanan Streets in Topeka, Kansas. Designed by architect Seymour Davis, the home was built between 1886 and 1888 for Erasmus Bennett, a breeder and importer of registered draft horses. The two-story, red brick structure trimmed in terra cotta, had a hint of a Tudor style with the tall towers and turrets. The Bennett Family lived in this beautifully designed and orate home until 1901, when the state of Kansas purchased the residence for $26,000 for a governor's mansion. As governors came and went, changes in décor were made to the home. The only major structural change to the mansion was the addition of a sleeping porch built on to the rear. In 1910, Governor W. R. Stubbs had the red bricks painted yellow but later they were painted white and remained so for the life of the house. As the years passed efforts continued to be made toward the upkeep of the mansion, but it would not be enough to keep ahead of the rapid deterioration. On January 28, 1962, the last official function, a pre-Kansas Day reception, was held at the governor's mansion and by January of 1965, the home was demolished.


Erasmus Bennett home, Topeka, Kansas

Erasmus Bennett home, Topeka, Kansas
Creator: Zercher Post Card Co.
Date: Between 1900 and 1919
This colored postcard shows the Bennett home at the corner of Eighth and Buchanan Streets in Topeka, Kansas. Designed by architect Seymour Davis, the home was built between 1886 and 1888 for Erasmus Bennett, a breeder and importer of registered draft horses. The two-story, red brick structure trimmed in terra cotta, had a hint of a Tudor style with tall towers and turrets. The Bennett family lived in this beautifully designed and ornate home until 1901, when the state of Kansas purchased the residence for $26,000 for a governor's mansion. As governors came and went, changes in décor were made to the home. The only major structural change to the mansion, was the addition of a sleeping porch built on to the rear. In 1910, Governor W.R. Stubbs had the red bricks painted yellow, but later they were painted white and remained so for the life of the house. As the years passed, efforts continued to be made toward the upkeep of the mansion, but it would not be enough to keep ahead of the rapid deterioration. On January 28, 1962, the last official function, a pre-Kansas Day reception, was held at the governor's mansion and by January 1965, the home was demolished.


Erasmus Bennett home, Topeka, Kansas

Erasmus Bennett home, Topeka, Kansas
Date: March 23, 1964
This black and white photograph shows the Bennett home at the corner of Eighth and Buchanan Streets in Topeka, Kansas. Designed by architect Seymour Davis, the home was built between 1886 and 1888 for Erasmus Bennett, a breeder and importer of registered draft horses. The two-story red brick structure trimmed in terra cotta, had a hint of a Tudor style with the tall towers and turrets. The Bennett family lived in this beautifully designed and ornate home until 1910, when the state of Kansas purchased the residence for $26,000 for a governor's mansion. As governors came and went, changes in décor were made to the home. The only major structural change to the mansion, was the addition of a sleeping porch built on to the rear. In 1910, Gov. W.R. Stubbs had the red bricks painted yellow but latter they were painted white and remained so for the life of the house. As the years passed efforts continued to be made toward the upkeep of the mansion, but it would not be enough to keep ahead of the rapid deterioration. On January 28, 1962, the last official function a pre-Kansas Day reception was held at the governor's mansion and by January of 1965, the home was demolished.


Erasmus Bennett home, Topeka, Kansas

Erasmus Bennett home, Topeka, Kansas
Date: Between 1950s and 1960s
This black and white photograph shows the Bennett home at the corner of Eighth and Buchanan Streets in Topeka, Kansas. Designed by architect Seymour Davis, the home was built between 1886 and 1888 for Erasmus Bennett, a breeder and importer of registered draft horses. The two-story red brick structure trimmed in terra cotta, had a hint of a Tudor style with the tall towers and turrets. The Bennett family lived in this beautifully designed and ornate home until 1901, when the state of Kansas purchased the residence for $26,000 for a governor's mansion. As governors came and went, changes in décor were made to the home. The only major structural change to the mansion was the addition of a sleeping porch built on the rear. In 1910, Gov. W. R. Stubbs had the red bricks painted yellow but later they were painted white and remained so for the life of the house. As the years passed efforts continued to be made toward the upkeep of the mansion, but it would not be enough to keep ahead of the rapid deterioration. On January 28, 1962, the last official function a pre-Kansas Day reception, was held at the governor's mansion and by January of 1965 the home was demolished.


Erasmus Bennett home, Topeka, Kansas

Erasmus Bennett home, Topeka, Kansas
Date: Between 1890 and 1910
This sepia colored photograph shows the Bennett home at the corner of Eighth and Buchanan Streets in Topeka, Kansas. Designed by architect Seymour Davis, the home was built between 1886 and 1888 for Erasmus Bennett, a breeder and importer of registered draft horses. The two-story red brick structure, trimmed in terra cotta, had a hint of a Tudor style with the tall towers and turrets. The Bennett family lived in this beautifully designed and ornate home until 1901, when the state of Kansas purchased the residence for $26,000 for a governor's mansion. As governors came and went, changes in decor were made to the home. The only major structural change to the mansion was the addition of a sleeping porch built on the rear. In 1910, Gov. W. R. Stubbs had the red brick painted yellow but later it was painted white and remained so for the life of the house. As the years passed, efforts continued to be made toward the upkeep of the mansion, but it would not be enough to keep ahead of the rapid deterioration. On January 28, 1962, the last official function, a pre-Kansas Day reception, was held at the governor's mansion and by January of 1965 the home was demolished.


Erasmus Bennett home, Topeka, Kansas

Erasmus Bennett home, Topeka, Kansas
Date: Between 1900 and 1910
This sepia colored photograph shows the Bennett home at the corner of Eighth and Buchanan Streets in Topeka, Kansas. Designed by architect Seymour Davis, the home was built between 1886 and 1888 for Erasmus Bennett, a breeder and importer of registered draft horses. The two-story red brick structure trimmed in terra cotta, had a hint of a Tudor style with the tall towers and turrets. The Bennett family lived in this beautifully designed and ornate home until 1901, when the state of Kansas purchased the residence for $26,000 for a governor's mansion. As governors came and went, changes in décor were made to the home. The only major structural change to the mansion, was the addition of a sleeping porch built on to the rear. In 1910, Gov. W. R. Stubbs had the red bricks painted yellow but later they were painted white and remained so for the life of the house. As the years passed efforts continued to be made toward the upkeep of the mansion, but it would not be enough to keep ahead of the rapid deterioration. On January 28, 1962, the last official function a pre-Kansas Day reception, was held at the governor's mansion and by January of 1965, the home was demolished.


Erasmus Bennett home, Topeka, Kansas

Erasmus Bennett home, Topeka, Kansas
Date: Between 1950s and 1960s
This black and white photograph shows the Bennett home at the corner of Eighth and Buchanan Streets in Topeka, Kansas. Designed by architect Seymour Davis, the home was built between 1886 and 1888 for Erasmus Bennett, a breeder and importer of registered draft horses. The two-story, red brick structure trimmed in terra cotta, had a hint of a Tudor style with tall towers and turrets. The Bennett family lived in this beautifully designed and ornate home until 1901, when the state of Kansas purchased the residence for $26,000 for a governor's mansion. As governors came and went, changes in décor were made to the home. The only major structural change to the mansion, was the addition of a sleeping porch built on to the rear. In 1910, Governor W.R. Stubbs had the red bricks painted yellow, but later they were painted white and remained so for the life of the house. As the years passed, efforts continued to be made toward the upkeep of the mansion, but it would not be enough to keep ahead of the rapid deterioration. On January 28, 1962, the last official function, a pre-Kansas Day reception, was held at the governor's mansion and by January 1965, the home was demolished.


Erasmus Bennett home, Topeka, Kansas

Erasmus Bennett home, Topeka, Kansas
Date: Between 1940s and 1960s
These two black and white photographs show the Bennett home at the corner of Eighth and Buchanan Streets in Topeka, Kansas. Designed by architect Seymour Davis, the home was built between 1886 and 1888 for Erasmus Bennett, a breeder and importer of registered draft horses. The two-story red brick structure trimmed in terra cotta had a hint of a Tudor style with the tall towers and turrets. The Bennett family lived in this beautifully designed and ornate home until 1901, when the state of Kansas purchased the residence for $26,000 for a governor's mansion. As governors came and went, changes in décor were made to the home. The only major structural change to the mansion, was the addition of a sleeping porch built onto the rear. In 1910, Governor W. R. Stubbs had the red bricks painted yellow but later they were painted white and remained so for the life of the house. As the years passed, efforts continued to be made toward the upkeep of the mansion, but it would not be enough to keep ahead of the rapid deterioration. On January 28, 1962, the last official function, a pre-Kansas Day reception, was held at the governor's mansion and by January of 1965 the home was demolished.


Flower trestle, Rogler home

Flower trestle, Rogler home
Date: Between 1900s and 1930s
This black and white photograph shows flowers blooming on a trestle at the back door of the Rogler home. The homestead known as "Pioneer Bluffs", is located on 160 acres of land along the South Fork of the Cottonwood River basin, in the Bazaar Township of Chase County, Kansas. The Rogler family owned and operated the ranch from 1859 to 2006. In October of 2006 the historic property, which included the home and 4,081 acres of land, was auctioned off at 6.9 million dollars. Today, "Pioneer Bluffs" is a non-profit educational center that is dedicated to teaching the history of ranching and the diversity of the tall grass prairie.


Fred Tainter's ranch

Fred Tainter's ranch
Creator: Steele, F. M. (Francis Marion), 1866-1936
Date: 1898
View of the Fred Tainter ranch house and out-buildings. Next to the ranch house is a wagon, and cattle are visible in the foreground and background.


George Grant's villa, Ellis County, Kansas

George Grant's villa, Ellis County, Kansas
Date: Between 1873 and 1883
This black and white photograph shows a view of the two-story native limestone home of George Grant, the founder of the English community in Victoria, Ellis County, Kansas. The structure built south of Victoria became the center of social and agricultural activities when Grant brought the first Aberdeen-Angus cattle to the area. In 1973, the home was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.


H.W. Avery House, Clay County, Kansas

H.W. Avery House, Clay County, Kansas
Date: Between 1900s and 1920s
This black and white photograph shows a view of the Herman W. Avery's two-story red brick house with green Spanish tiles in Clay County, Kansas. When the Avery family first acquired the 1,000 acres of land it was used for raising Percheron draft horses, later becoming a feed and livestock operation. In 1964, the house and surrounding buildings were dismantled to make way for the Milford Reservoir on the Republican River. Some years later William H. Avery, former Governor of Kansas and son of Herman W., returned to the family farm to build a home on the remaining land.


H.W. Avery farm, Clay County, Kansas

H.W. Avery farm, Clay County, Kansas
Date: Between 1900s and 1920s
This black and white photograph shows the Herman W. Avery farm in Clay County, Kansas. When the Avery family first acquired the 1,000 acres of land it was used for raising Percheron draft horses, later becoming a feed and livestock operation. In 1964, the house and surrounding buildings were dismantled to make way for the Milford Reservoir on the Republican River. Some years later William H. Avery, former Governor of Kansas and son of Herman W., returned to the family farm to build a home on the remaining land.


Home in Garden City

Home in Garden City
Creator: Wolf, Henry L. 1850-1924
Date: Between 1900 and 1920
An exterior view of a home in Garden City, Kansas. Visible in the photograph is a child with a baby carriage, a woman sitting in a swing, a woman at a gate, and a man seated in a horse drawn carriage.


Isaac Goodnow residence, Manhattan, Kansas

Isaac Goodnow residence, Manhattan, Kansas
Date: 1938
These are two photographs of the Isaac Goodnow property. Isaac T. Goodnow, a native of Vermont, came to Kansas in 1855 with the New England Emigrant Aid Company. The company had the idea of building a community, which would eventually become Manhattan. Goodnow became heavily involved in the free state disputes that argued whether Kansas ought to become a free or slave state. He became a co-founder and the first president of Bluemont College. Perhaps Goodnow's greatest contribution to the educational climate of Manhattan was his work in locating the Kansas Agricultural College there. The building and grounds of Bluemont College were donated to the state to serve as the foundation for the new institution, which developed into the present-day Kansas State University. Some 82,000 acres of land were given by the federal government to support the agricultural college. Goodnow converted more than half of this acreage into much needed cash during his tenure as land agent for the college from 1867 to 1873. Goodnow spent most of his life in service to the state of Kansas. He died in 1894. The house that he and his wife, Ellen, occupied is now Goodnow House State Historic Site, administered by the Kansas Historical Society.


Isaac Goodnow residence, Manhattan, Kansas

Isaac Goodnow residence, Manhattan, Kansas
Date: Between 1938 and 1939
This is a photograph of the Isaac T. Goodnow house well. Isaac T. Goodnow, a native of Vermont, came to Kansas in 1855 with the New England Emigrant Aid Company. The company had the idea of building a community, which would eventually become Manhattan. Goodnow became heavily involved in the free state disputes that argued whether Kansas ought to become a free or slave state. He became a co-founder and the first president of Bluemont College. Perhaps Goodnow's greatest contribution to the educational climate of Manhattan was his work in locating the Kansas Agricultural College there. The building and grounds of Bluemont College were donated to the state to serve as the foundation for the new institution, which developed into the present-day Kansas State University. Some 82,000 acres of land were given by the federal government to support the agricultural college. Goodnow converted more than half of this acreage into much needed cash during his tenure as land agent for the college from 1867 to 1873. Goodnow spent most of his life in service to the state of Kansas. He died in 1894. The house that he and his wife, Ellen, occupied is now Goodnow House State Historic Site, administered by the Kansas Historical Society.


Rogler home

Rogler home
Date: 1918
This black and white photograph shows a view of the spirea bushes in bloom at the Rogler home. This homestead, known as "Pioneer Bluffs", is located on 160 acres of land along the South Fork of the Cottonwood River basin, in Bazaar Township of Chase County, Kansas. The Rogler family owned and operated the ranch from 1859 to 2006. In October 2006, the historic property, which included the home and 4,081 acres of land, was auctioned off at 6.9 million dollars. Today "Pioneer Bluffs" is a non-profit educational center that is dedicated to teaching the history of ranching and the diversity of the tall grass prairie.


Rogler home

Rogler home
Date: Between 1909 and 1939
This black and white photograph shows a view from the porch side of the Henry and Maud Rogler home. This homestead, known as "Pioneer Bluffs", is located on 160 acres of land along the South Fork of the Cottonwood River basin, in Bazaar Township of Chase County, Kansas. The Rogler family owned and operated the ranch from 1859 to 2006. In October 2006, the historic property, which included the home and 4,081 acres of land, was auctioned off at 6.9 million dollars. Today "Pioneer Bluffs" is a non-profit educational center that is dedicated to teaching the history of ranching and the diversity of the tall grass prairie.


Rogler home

Rogler home
Date: July 1897
This black and white photograph shows Albert Rogler reading in front of the Rogler home. The house which faced the west, was moved in 1908 when the new home was built. This is the second structure built around 1876. There was a later undated addition.


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