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Anti-Populist political ribbon

Anti-Populist political ribbon
Date: 1894
A blue political campaign ribbon sponsored by the Emporia Gazette (newspaper) promoting "more [corn], less hell" in 1894. The slogan is a rebuttal of the Populist appeal that farmers raise "less corn and more hell" often attributed to Populist agitator Mary Elizabeth Lease.


Jeremiah Simpson political ribbon

Jeremiah Simpson political ribbon
Date: between 1892 and 1898
Jeremiah (Jerry) Simpson (1842-1905) served in the Civil War and moved to Barber Co. near Medicine Lodge Kansas in 1878. He unsuccessfully ran for the Kansas House of Representatives on the Independent ticket twice, but served two terms as a populist from 1891-1895 and one term from 1897-1899.


Jeremiah Simpson political ribbon

Jeremiah Simpson political ribbon
Date: between 1892 and 1893
Jeremiah (Jerry) Simpson (1842-1905) served in the Civil War and moved to Barber County near Medicine Lodge, Kansas in 1878. He unsuccessfully ran for the Kansas House of Representatives on the Independent ticket twice, but served two terms as a populist from 1891-1895 and one term from 1897-1899. Lorenzo Dow Lewelling (1846-1900) moved from Salem, Iowa to Wichita, Kansas in 1887. In 1892 he was elected and served as the populist governor of Kansas. In 1894 he was nominated for a second term but the platform declared in favor of woman suffrage, which alienated Democratic support, and this, together with the recollections of the stormy scenes attending the opening days of his administration, encompassed his defeat. Beginning in 1896 he served in the Kansas senate until his death in Arkansas City, Kansas in 1900.


John C. Fremont political ribbon

John C. Fremont political ribbon
Date: 1856
Kansas statehood was a major issue in the 1856 presidential election. John C. Fremont was the candidate of the newly formed Republican Party, which wanted Kansas admitted as a free state.


Lewelling political ribbon

Lewelling political ribbon
Date: 1892
Lorenzo Dow Lewelling (1846-1900) moved from Salem, Iowa to Wichita, Kansas in 1887. In 1892 he was elected and served as the populist governor of Kansas. In 1894 he was nominated for a second term but the platform declared in favor of woman suffrage, which alienated Democratic support, and this, together with the recollections of the stormy scenes attending the opening days of his administration, encompassed his defeat. Beginning in 1896 he served in the Kansas senate until his death in Arkansas City, Kansas in 1900.


Lewelling political ribbon

Lewelling political ribbon
Date: 1892
LoLorenzo Dow Lewelling (1846-1900) moved from Salem, Iowa to Wichita, Kansas in 1887. In 1892 he was elected and served as the populist governor of Kansas. In 1894 he was nominated for a second term but the platform declared in favor of woman suffrage, which alienated Democratic support, and this, together with the recollections of the stormy scenes attending the opening days of his administration, encompassed his defeat. Beginning in 1896 he served in the Kansas senate until his death in Arkansas City, Kansas in 1900. The July 4,1892 Omaha convention defined the basic tenets of the populist movement and made several specific proposals such as the graduated income tax, the secret ballot, the direct election of senators, and the 8 hour work day.


People's Party political ribbon

People's Party political ribbon
Date: between 1890 and 1908
In 1890, Populist Party won control of the Kansas state legislature. The People's Party (more commonly known as the Populist Party) was established as a reform movement with roots across the country, but nowhere stronger than in Kansas. These "Populists" wanted to change the monetary system to make currency more readily available; to create income tax with a sliding scale based on earnings; to put railroads, telegraph, and telephones under government control; to prevent foreign ownership of land; and to overhaul the election process, giving the public more control.


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