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10,000th Kaydet is delivered Friday to armed forces

10,000th Kaydet is delivered Friday to armed forces
Creator: Wichita Eagle
Date: July 29, 1944
This article from the Wichita Eagle covers the release of the 10,000 Boeing/Stearman Kaydet training airplane and the B-29 "X" airplane. Both airplanes had their production numbers painted on their fuselage to represent their respective milestones in aircraft production. The "X" on the B-29 denoted the fact that the official production numbers for the B-29 were classified during World War II.


8,000 students affected, state officials see no trouble adjusting schools to new rule

8,000 students affected, state officials see no trouble adjusting schools to new rule
Creator: Topeka Journal
Date: May 17, 1954
This article discusses how the state of Kansas will work to conform to the ruling made in the Brown v. Board of Education decision on May 17, 1954. The U.S. Supreme Court had ruled that the segregation of schools based on race was unconstitutional. Many cities in Kansas, including Topeka, Atchison, Salina, Wichita, and Pittsburg were already working to integrate their schools. Topeka had an estimated 625 African American students who would be affected by the court's ruling, and the article lists the numbers for other cities and towns in the state.


A.E. Hunt's 'aeroplane' that never flew used principles involved in today's whirlies

A.E. Hunt's 'aeroplane' that never flew used principles involved in today's whirlies
Creator: Wichita Eagle
Date: January 8, 1956
This article published in the the Wichita Eagle deals with the accomplishments of early aviation enthusiast A.E. Hunt. Hunt, of Jetmore, Kansas, built a flying machine in 1910 containing design elements that would later be refined and used in some of the world's first helicopters. In fact, the article compares the features found on Hunt's rotary aircraft to a Cessna CH-1 helicopter in order to demonstrate the similarities between the basic elements of each craft's design.


Aaron A. Platner, World War I soldier

Aaron A. Platner, World War I soldier
Date: 1918-1921
Around 1919, the Kansas State Historical Society and the American Legion solicited biographical information from returning veterans (primarily members of the 35th and 89th infantry divisions) and the families of those who died in service, notably from the Gold Star Mothers. Each veteran or family member was asked to provide letters, photographs, a biography, and military records. This file contains information on Aaron A. Platner. Aaron died in late 1918 from wounds he received in the Battle of the Argonne.


Abel Alcala, World War II veteran

Abel Alcala, World War II veteran
Date: around 1980
This is a newspaper article on John Alcala and his father Abel G. Alcala of Topeka. Abel Alcala, a veteran of World War II, had a draft number of 25. This likely made him the first Mexican-American drafted in the United States. The 1966 book "Among the Valiant" by Raul Morin, however, cited Pete Aguilar Despart with a lottery number of 158 as the first drafted Mexican-American. Fourteen years later, John Alcala contacted the book's publisher and the Topeka Capital-Journal to set the record straight.


About Nicodemus, The Daily Journal

About Nicodemus, The Daily Journal
Creator: Lawrence Daily Journal
Date: April 30, 1879
This article from the Lawrence Daily Journal discusses a newspaper article from the Chicago Tribune written during the Exoduster Movement in 1879 providing a brief history of the black community of freed people at Nicodemus, Kansas settled in 1877. Nicodemus is now a historic site administered by the National Parks Service.


Action of Other Cities on the 'Exodus' Question

Action of Other Cities on the 'Exodus' Question
Creator: Wyandotte Gazette
Date: April 25, 1879
This article includes information about Exoduster relief efforts in both Topeka and Lawrence. In Topeka, the Kansas Freedmen's Aid Association had appealed to other counties, asking them to form local aid societies to assist refugees in their respective areas. Lawrence citizens held a meeting in Fraser Hall to discuss the Exodus; the attendees recognized the legitimacy of the Exodus and were willing to provide aid and support for the emigrants.


Aged German is given 48 hours to leave city!

Aged German is given 48 hours to leave city!
Creator: Topeka Journal
Date: February 19, 1918
This article published in the Topeka Journal covers the story of Daniel Klege. Klege, a 75 year old resident of Topeka, Kansas, and veteran of the Civil War, was ordered to leave Topeka until the end of the war with Germany because he had never registered to become a naturalized U.S. citizen.


A hanging in Kansas

A hanging in Kansas
Creator: Topeka State Journal Company
Date: February 18, 1916
This newspaper article published in the Topeka State Journal illustrates the confusion surrounding the history of state death penalty laws in Kansas. The article concerns the possible execution, under federal law, of a convict at the federal penitentiary at Leavenworth. The article claims that should this execution proceed "Kansas will see its first legal hanging in its history as a state." The article concludes by saying "that there never has been a hanging under state law in Kansas." In fact, between 1862-1888 there were nine legal executions in Kansas under state law, three under military law, and two under federal law. The state repealed its capital punishment law in 1907.


Albert Dewey Baughman, World War I soldier

Albert Dewey Baughman, World War I soldier
Date: 1918
Around 1919, the Kansas State Historical Society and the American Legion solicited biographical information from returning veterans (primarily members of the 35th and 89th infantry divisions) and the families of those who died in service, notably from the Gold Star Mothers. Each veteran or family member was asked to provide letters, photographs, a biography, and military records. This file contains information on Albert Dewey Baughman, 27th Aero Squadron. Baughman died in France on August 29, 1918 from injuries he sustained in a motorcycle accident.


A lesson of the exodus

A lesson of the exodus
Creator: Topeka Daily Capital
Date: April 23, 1879
This article discusses what lessons may be learned from the black exodus out of the South. The unnamed author maintains that Southerners will realize their dependence upon black labor. Furthermore, Northerners will be encouraged to see that they must continue what they began during the Civil War and that they cannot let white Southerners rule the country.


Alexander Howat interview

Alexander Howat interview
Creator: Topeka Journal
Date: April 12 - 14, 1921
In this series of articles, Alexander Howat, president of the Kansas miners, pleads the cause of organized labor and denounces the newly created Kansas Court of Industrial Relations in an interview with Topeka Journal staff reporters. The reporters were Wm Huggins, Jr, son of the current Court of Industrial Relations judge, and Mildred Reed, daughter of a former judge.


Alexander R. Bell, World War I soldier

Alexander R. Bell, World War I soldier
Creator: Bell, Alexander R.
Date: 1918-1919
Around 1919, the Kansas State Historical Society and the American Legion solicited biographical information from returning veterans (primarily members of the 35th and 89th infantry divisions) and the families of those who died in service, notably from the Gold Star Mothers. Each veteran or family member was asked to provide letters, photographs, a biography, and military records. This file contains information on Alexander R. Bell, Company A, 110th Engineers, 35th Division.


Alfred Terry Beach, World War I soldier

Alfred Terry Beach, World War I soldier
Date: 1919
Around 1919, the Kansas State Historical Society and the American Legion solicited biographical information from returning veterans (primarily members of the 35th and 89th infantry divisions) and the families of those who died in service, notably from the Gold Star Mothers. Each veteran or family member was asked to provide letters, photographs, a biography, and military records. This file contains information on Alfred Terry Beach, Company E, 353rd Infantry, 89th Division. Alfred was killed on November 3, 1918 in the Meuse-Argonne Offensive.


Alien enemies' wives are loyal

Alien enemies' wives are loyal
Creator: Topeka Capital
Date: January 1, 1918
This article printed in the Topeka Capital details an incident involving Charles H. Johnson and Joseph Fisckale, both of whom expressed sympathies for the Germany and Austria. Turned in by their American-born wives, Johnson and Fisckale were "sent to a place of safe keeping until after the war."


All alien enemies liable to arrest

All alien enemies liable to arrest
Creator: Topeka Capital
Date: June 19, 1917
This article, published in the June 19, 1917, edition of the Topeka Capital addresses the law prohibiting German immigrants who were not naturalized U.S. citizens from entering the Topeka Business District without a special permit from the U.S. Marshall Office. Anyone violating the law could be placed in jail without trial until the end of the war.


Amazon army, near Pittsburg, Kansas

Amazon army, near Pittsburg, Kansas
Creator: New York Times
Date: December 25, 1921
This newspaper clipping, from the New York Times, features a group of women gathered during a coal mine strike near Pittsburg, Kansas. Dubbed the "Amazon Army," the women marched through the coal fields carrying large American flags to show their support for better wages and improved working conditions for their family members who worked in the camps. The caption reads: "Women Raiders Invading a Mine. Near Pittsburg, Kan., forcing the workmen to drop their tools and kiss the American flag."


Amazon army, near Pittsburg, Kansas

Amazon army, near Pittsburg, Kansas
Creator: New York Times
Date: December 25, 1921
This newspaper clipping, from the New York Times, features a group of women marching in protest during a coal mine strike in southeast Kansas. Dubbed the" Amazon Army," the women marched through the coal fields carrying large American flags to show their support for better wages and improved working conditions for their family members who worked in the camps.


Amazon army, near Pittsburg, Kansas

Amazon army, near Pittsburg, Kansas
Creator: New York Times
Date: December 25, 1921
This newspaper clipping, from the New York Times, features a group of women marching in protest during a coal mine strike in southeast Kansas. Dubbed the "Amazon Army," the women marched through the coal fields carrying infants and or American flags to show their support for better wages and improved working conditions for their family members who worked in the camps. The caption reads: "Section of the Army Amazons. In the Kansas coal fields, captained by a woman with a three month-old baby in arms."


Andrew Barr (R?). Jacobs, World War I soldier

Andrew Barr (R?). Jacobs, World War I soldier
Date: 1918
Around 1919, the Kansas State Historical Society and the American Legion solicited biographical information from returning veterans (primarily members of the 35th and 89th infantry divisions) and the families of those who died in service, notably from the Gold Star Mothers. Each veteran or family member was asked to provide letters, photographs, a biography, and military records. This file contains information on Andrew Barr (R.?) Jacobs, Company M, 353rd Infantry, 89th Division.


Andrew Gordon Graham, World War I soldier

Andrew Gordon Graham, World War I soldier
Date: 1918
Around 1919, the Kansas State Historical Society and the American Legion solicited biographical information from returning veterans (primarily members of the 35th and 89th infantry divisions) and the families of those who died in service, notably from the Gold Star Mothers. Each veteran or family member was asked to provide letters, photographs, a biography, and military records. This file contains information on Andrew Gordon Graham, Battery A, 342nd Field Artillery, 89th Division.


Another shrewd scheme of our enemies: they try to mislead the people and drive men into the support of the old parties

Another shrewd scheme of our enemies: they try to mislead the people and drive men into the support of the old parties
Creator: Chase, Salmon P. (Salmon Portland), 1808-1873
Date: 1890s
The State Central Committee of the People's Party had the statement addressed "To the Voters of Kansas" printed to warn of the corrupt practices of the two established political parties. The statement charges the Republicans of trying to discredit the People's Party in order to maintain control of Kansas government. S. W. Chase signed this document as chairman of the State Central Committee.


Are You With or Against the Hun?

Are You With or Against the Hun?
Creator: Canton Pilot
Date: April 25, 1918
This article, published in the April 25, 1918, edition of the Canton Pilot, encourages readers to buy Liberty Bonds in order to "show the world where you stand."


Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway's miniature train and the engineer Merle A. Benson

Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway's miniature train and the engineer Merle A. Benson
Date: 1927-1964
Here are photographs and newspaper articles about Merle A. Benson, engineer, on Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway's miniature train. He was at the throttle of the little parade train for 37 years before retiring on December 31, 1963. Benson traveled thousands of miles to participate in parades, expositions, celebrations, and other events. The original miniature freight train, which was headed by an engine designed after the old steam locomotives, was built in 1926 at the Topeka shops. In 1927, a miniature passenger train was built as a companion. The power source for both trains was Model-T Ford motors and transmissions. In 1937, the steam locomotive design was replaced by a diesel-type jacket over the same power source. Use of the passenger train was discontinued in 1942 and it was finally scrapped in 1951. Before the passenger train was retired, it consisted of three Pullman cars, a buffet-library car and a dining car. The freight train consisted of the locomotive plus a coal car, refrigerator car, boxcar, stock car, tank car and caboose. During the off-season he would provide maintenance on the miniature trains and get them ready for the next season. Benson was born in Greeley, Kansas in 1896, and he moved to Topeka in 1923. He started to work in the Santa Fe shops as a car man helper and in 1924, he became a machinist.


Await a Parsons Boom

Await a Parsons Boom
Creator: Kansas City Times
Date: July 01, 1941
This article, from the Kansas City Times, details the often significant economic impact associated with the building of military or defense related facilities. In Parsons, Kansas, the most obvious impact of the decision to build a artillery munitions plant was on the area around Parsons where more than 300 homes were built to house the men and women who worked at the plant.


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