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Government and Politics - Federal Government - Federal agencies and programs - Policies and programs - Land - Homestead Act

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Boomer Camp on Walnut River, Arkansas City, Kansas

Boomer Camp on Walnut River, Arkansas City, Kansas
Creator: Mitchell & DeGroff
Date: 1889
This sepia colored photograph shows a "boomer" camp on the banks of the Walnut River in Arkansas City, Kansas. The "boomers" were white settlers who were attempting to settle in the Indian Territory of Oklahoma. Some of the "boomers" would camp near the Kansas and Oklahoma border waiting to enter the territory to claim land that had not been assigned to Indian Tribes. Many of the settlers believed that the unassigned land was in the public domain under the Homestead Act of 1862, despite the fact that the lands were assigned for the settlement of Native Americans.


Boomer Camp on Walnut River, Arkansas City, Kansas

Boomer Camp on Walnut River, Arkansas City, Kansas
Date: Between 1886 and 1889
This sepia colored photograph shows a "boomer" camp on the banks of the Walnut River in Arkansas City, Kansas. The "boomers" were white settlers who were attempting to settle in the Indian Territory of Oklahoma, which was the last area of the nation set aside for Native American tribes. Some of the "boomers" would camp near the Kansas and Oklahoma border waiting to enter the territory to claim land that had not been assigned to Indian Tribes. Many of the settlers believed that the unassigned land was in the public domain under the Homestead Act of 1862.


Boomer Camp on Walnut River, Arkansas City, Kansas

Boomer Camp on Walnut River, Arkansas City, Kansas
Creator: Mitchell & DeGroff
Date: Between 1886 and 1889
This sepia colored photograph shows a couple of "boomers" on the banks of the Walnut River in Arkansas City, Kansas. The "boomers" were white settlers who were attempting to settle in the Indian Territory of Oklahoma. Some of the "boomers would camp near the Kansas and Oklahoma border waiting to enter the territory to claim land that had not been assigned to Indian Tribes. Many of the settlers believed that the unassigned land was in the public domain under the Homestead Act of 1862. The land in question was some of the last land in the United States that had been set aside for Native American tribes, many of which had been removed from their ancestral lands.


Boomer Camp on Walnut River, Arkansas City, Kansas

Boomer Camp on Walnut River, Arkansas City, Kansas
Creator: Mitchell & DeGroff
Date: Between 1886 and 1889
This sepia colored photograph shows a group of "boomers" near the banks of the Walnut River in Arkansas City, Kansas. The "boomers" were white settlers who were attempting to settle in the Indian Territory of Oklahoma. Some of the "boomers" would camp near the Kansas and Oklahoma border waiting to enter the territory to claim land that had not been assigned to Indian tribes. Many of the settlers believed that the unassigned land was in the public domain under the Homestead Act of 1862. The land was some of the last that had been set aside for the settlement of Native American tribes after they had been removed from their ancestral lands.


Boomer camp on Walnut River, Arkansas City, Kansas

Boomer camp on Walnut River, Arkansas City, Kansas
Date: Between 1886 and 1889
This black and white photograph shows a "Boomer" camp on the banks of the Walnut River in Arkansas City, Kansas. The "Boomers" were white settlers who were attempting to settle in the Indian Territory of Oklahoma. Some of the "Boomers" would camp near the Kansas Oklahoma border waiting to enter the territory to claim land that had not been assigned to Indian Tribes and was believed to be in the public domain under the Homestead Act of 1862. The land in question was some of the last land set aside for the settlement of Native American tribes who had been removed from their lands in other parts of the U.S.


Boomer camp on Walnut River, Arkansas City, Kansas

Boomer camp on Walnut River, Arkansas City, Kansas
Creator: Mitchell & DeGroff
Date: Between 1886 and 1889
This sepia colored photograph shows a "boomer" camp on the banks of the Walnut River in Arkansas City, Kansas. The "boomers" were white settlers who were attempting to settle in the Indian Territory of Oklahoma. Some of the "boomers" would camp near the Kansas and Oklahoma border waiting to enter the territory to claim land that had not been assigned to Indian Tribes. Many of the settlers believed that the unassigned land was in the public domain under the Homestead Act of 1862.


Boomer camp on Walnut River, Arkansas City, Kansas

Boomer camp on Walnut River, Arkansas City, Kansas
Creator: Mitchell & DeGroff
Date: Between 1886 and 1889
This sepia colored photograph shows a "Boomer" camp on the banks of the Walnut River in Arkansas City, Kansas. The "Boomers" were white settlers who were attempting to settle in the Indian Territory of Oklahoma. Some of the "Boomers" would camp near the Kansas Oklahoma border waiting to enter the territory to claim land that had not been assigned to Indian Tribes and was believed to be in the public domain under the Homestead Act of 1862. The land in question was some of the last few sections of lands set aside by the U.S. Government for the Native American tribes who had been removed from their ancestral lands in other parts of the U.S.


Free Texas land excursion tickets

Free Texas land excursion tickets
Creator: Missouri, Kansas & Texas Railway Company
Date: 1881
This broadside promotes settlement in Texas and passage there through the Missouri Pacific Railway. It also promotes the landscape of the Indian territory as a scenic route, and addresses Texas land laws, the people of Texas, and the climate. The agent is listed as C. E. Styles, Sixth Street Depot, Atchison, Kansas. This item demonstrates the considerable involvement of railroad companies in immigration and land settlement in the American West, and the promotion of the West as a tourist destination.


Kansas land survey plats

Kansas land survey plats
Creator: U.S. Surveyor General of Kansas and Nebraska
Date: 1855-1861
The U.S. Surveyor General began surveying Kansas after the passage of the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854. Plat maps were created at that time to document the surveys. The plats show public lands within the territory divided by range, township and section. Townships were measured in six mile increments starting from the Kansas-Nebraska border. Ranges were numbered in six mile increments east and west from the Sixth Prime Meridian, which crosses through present day Wichita, Kansas. This system is still the basis for legal land description in the state. The Kansas Historical Society acquired a collection of these original plats previously held by the Kansas Secretary of State. The National Archives and the Bureau of Land Management also hold copies of the plats. The sixteen plats presented here are from the Kansas Historical Society collection but are not included in the National Archives copies. These plats cover portions of Douglas, Jefferson, Johnson, Shawnee and Wyandotte counties. Kansas land surveyors are the most frequent users of these maps. They use them to verify section corners when surveying land. A complete collection of the original plats is available in the Society's Center for Historical Research. The plats are also available on microfilm (AR 137-143). For more information on these plats and the accompanying field notes, click on the Land Survey Maps link below.


Oklahoma land run

Oklahoma land run
Creator: Prettyman, William S., 1858-1932
Date: September 16, 1893
This black and white photograph shows the Oklahoma land run. The image taken at noon on September 16, 1893, indicates the opening of public land to white settlers in the Indian Territory of Oklahoma. Under the Homestead Act of 1862, a settler could claim 160 acres of land if they lived on the claim and made steady improvements to it. If those requirements were met at the end of five years, the homesteader could file for the title of the land with the United States government.


Settlers on Osage lands, resolution of the legislature of Kansas

Settlers on Osage lands, resolution of the legislature of Kansas
Creator: United States. Congress. House
Date: 1867
This resolution from the House of Representatives mandates that the requirements for settlement under the Homestead Act of 1862 be extended to lands in Kansas recently purchased from the Osage Indians. Copied from The Miscellaneous Documents of the House of Representatives, 2nd session, 39th Congress.


Vote the Land Free stamp

Vote the Land Free stamp
Date: between 1844 and 1848
This stamp was used by the National Reform Party to impress the phrase "Vote the Land Free" on U. S. coins in the 1840s. In 1844, the National Reform Association (NRA) was organized by George Henry Evans in New York City to lobby Congress for free homesteads in the West. By marking coins, the NRA hoped to attract recognition. The donor, Ellis Smalley was a blacksmith, political activist, and former probate judge near Council Grove. Smalley was a delegate from Plainfield, New Jersey, at the first convention held in October of 1845, and was elected Secretary of the National Reform Association. Among his duties, on May 16, 1844, Smalley and other members of the NRA signed a letter to Joseph Smith, leader of the Mormon Church, asking Smith's opinions concerning public lands. In 1848, NRA was absorbed into other political movements, like the Free Soil and Abolitionists. The efforts of the NRA led to the Homestead Act of 1862. By 1878 Smalley had moved to Kansas and was noted as a member of the City Council of Council Grove.


Showing 1 - 12

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