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Autographed baseball

Autographed baseball
Creator: Wyeth Hardware & Manufacturing Company
Date: 1951
The donor purchased this baseball as a child to have autographed at a Topeka Owls game, possibly in 1951. The Owls won the Western Association pennant in 1951, the same year their field was severely damaged by flood. The white leather baseball has red stitching and five signatures in blue ink. The Topeka Owls were a minor league professional baseball team in Class C of the Western Association. The autographed names are not completely legible, but seem to represent the following men: Elmer Le Roy "Butch" Nieman (1918-1993), born in Herkimer, Kansas, played for the Owls from 1947 to 1951, acting as manager from 1948 to 1951. He played for Kansas State University from 1938 to 1939 and was an outfielder for the Boston Braves from 1943 to 1945. John Robert "Jack" Dean (1923-2004), born in Marion, Kansas, played for the Topeka Owls from 1949 to 1953, serving as co-manager in 1952. He previously served in the Navy Air Corps during World War II. He received his bachelor's and master's degrees from KSU where he played basketball and baseball. He taught and coached at Topeka High School and at Salina South and Salina Central, retiring in 1985. Harry "Handsome Harry" Richard Suter (1887-1971) broke into the big leagues in 1909, with the Chicago White Sox. In 1932, he married Miriam Hanson in Assaria, Kansas, and, in 1933, while living in Salina, Kansas, was granted permission to form the Ban Johnson League of Kansas. He managed the Leslie Kreps Post American Legion baseball team in Salina, winning several state championships. In 1947 he moved to Topeka where he became a plumbing and heating engineer for the state architect's office, retiring in 1963. Tony Lucadello (1912-1989) worked as a scout for the Chicago Cubs from 1943 to 1957. The Topeka Owls were affiliated with the Cubs from 1951 to 1952. He worked as a scout with the Philadelphia Phillies from 1957 to 1989. During his career, he signed over 50 players to the major leagues. William J Prince (b. 1909) was a pitcher in the minor leagues from 1929 to 1942. He was a co-manager and manager of the Cedar Rapids Indians in 1953 and 1954. The team was affiliated with the Chicago Cubs at the time.


Boxing gloves

Boxing gloves
Creator: Schmelzer's Sporting Goods
Date: between 1911 and 1923
Boxing gloves from heavyweight champion Jess Willard. Born in Pottawatomie County in 1881, Willard was crowned world champion in 1915, defeating Jack Johnson in a controversial boxing match. Willard held the title for four years.


Ed Marling's Sunflower Girls softball team, Topeka, Kansas

Ed Marling's Sunflower Girls softball team, Topeka, Kansas
Creator: Sells Photo Topeka
Date: 1937
This black and white photograph shows the Ed Marling's Sunflower Girls softball team from Topeka, Kansas. The team members have been identified from left to right: Lela Adkins, Amelia Quast, Bernie Maxwell, Pearl Timble, Hazel Bartlett, Mary Young, Ruth Shears, Frances Dahlstrom, Lily Woods, Inez Quickbear, Anna Snook, Dorothy Garnett, and C.H. Crites, manager.


Elden Auker and Dan Lykins

Elden Auker and Dan Lykins
Creator: Lykins, Judy
Date: 1997
This is a photograph of Elden Auker and Dan Lykins at a Kansas State University function. Auker, from Norcatur, Kansas, was an outstanding athlete at Kansas State University lettering nine times. After leaving college, he played baseball with the Detroit Tigers, Boston Red Sox and St. Louis Browns. While with Detroit, Auker went to two consecutive World Series in 1934 and 1935. Dan Lykins, is a Topeka attorney and a member of the Kansas Board of Regents.


Football team, La Harpe, Kansas

Football team, La Harpe, Kansas
Creator: Miller, G. H .
Date: Between 1900 and 1909
This black and white photograph shows members of the football team from La Harpe, Kansas. In the foreground, a football with "Champions of Kansas" is visible.


Fred Choteau Campbell and baseball team

Fred Choteau Campbell and baseball team
Date: 1885
This sepia-colored photograph shows a group of baseball players with their equipment in Genoa, Nebraska. One of the men is Fred Choteau Campbell of Kansas.


Friends University Girls Soft Ball Team

Friends University Girls Soft Ball Team
Date: Unknown
Friends University girls soft ball team


Friends University football team

Friends University football team
Date: Unknown
This photograph depicts the Friends University football team. Friends University is located in Wichita, Sedgwick County.


Haskell Institute Baseball Team, Lawrence, Kansas

Haskell Institute Baseball Team, Lawrence, Kansas
Creator: Lawrence Studio
Date: 1917
This photograph from a glass plate negative shows the baseball team from Haskell Institute in Lawrence, Kansas


Haskell Institute baseball team, Lawrence, Kansas

Haskell Institute baseball team, Lawrence, Kansas
Creator: Lawrence Studio
Date: 1921
This photograph from a glass plate negative shows Haskell Institute's baseball team, Lawrence, Kansas.


Indianapolis Clowns

Indianapolis Clowns
Date: 1944
This black and white photograph shows members of the Indianapolis Clowns. The franchised was organized between 1935 and 1936 in Miami, Florida. The team moved in 1943 to Cincinnati, Ohio and later in 1946 to Indianapolis, Indiana. In the later years the team became a kind of the "Harlem Globetrotters" of baseball before disbanding in the late 1980s. Some of the players in this photograph have been identified. Back row: l to r; Hoss Walker, unknown, Johnny Williams, Fred Wilson, Roosevelt Davis, Alec Radcliff and McKinley "Bunny" Downs. Middle row: Sam Hairston, unknown, Buster Haywood, unknown, unknown. Front row: unknown, unknown, Richard "King Tut" King, unknown.


James Ryun

James Ryun
Creator: Stauffer Publications
Date: 1966
Jim Ryun running at a 1966 indoor meet.


Jess, Charles and Virgil Barnes in St. Petersburg, Florida

Jess, Charles and Virgil Barnes in St. Petersburg, Florida
Date: March 1924
This photograph is of three Barnes brothers from Jackson County, Kansas (from left to right): Jess Barnes, Charles Barnes, and Virgil Barnes. The photo was made in March 1924 in St. Petersburg, Florida. At the time, Jess and Virgil Barnes were major league pitchers--Jess for the Boston Braves and Virgil, for the New York Giants. Charles, also a pitcher, tried out with the Braves during spring training camp, but did not make the roster. The photo opportunity occurred when the Braves and Giants met in an exhibition game on March 22, although none of the brothers appeared in the lineup that day. The image was published in the April 3, 1924 issue of The Sporting News. Jess Barnes' career spanned the period 1915 through 1927, and involved three different teams--Boston Braves, New York Giants, and Brooklyn Robins. His overall record was 152 wins and 150 losses, with an ERA of 3.22. His best years were with the Giants, where he led the National League in wins in 1919, had two World Series wins in 1921, and pitched a no-hitter in 1922. Virgil "Zeke" Barnes pitched seven full seasons in the majors. He joined the New York Giants full-time in 1922 and stayed with the team most of his career. He had 61 major league wins, and a career ERA of 3.66. He made World Series appearances in 1923 and 1924, including the starting assignment in Game 7 of the 1924 World Series. On June 26, 1924, Jess and Virgil Barnes became the first pair of brothers to oppose each other as starters in a major league game--Jess for the Braves and Virgil for the Giants. Not pictured in the photograph is the youngest brother in the family, Clark Barnes. Clark also was a pitcher who received a tryout at the major league level. Like Charles, however, he did not make a major league roster. The four Barnes brothers and their three sisters were raised in Circleville, Kansas, by their parents, Luther and Sade Barnes.


Jess Willard

Jess Willard
Date: April 5, 1915
This sepia colored photograph shows Jess Willard, 1881-1968, defeating Jack Johnson, 1878-1946, in Havana, Cuba for the title of heavyweight champion of the world.


Jess Willard

Jess Willard
Date: Between 1915 and 1919
This photograph shows Jess Willard before a boxing match. Willard, a native of Pottawatomie County, Kansas, became the world heavyweight boxing champion on April 5, 1915, when he defeated defending champion Jack Johnson in a twenty-six round match in Havana, Cuba. The "Pottawatomie Giant" as Willard was known in the boxing world, had a career of twenty-five wins, but was unable to defend his title to challenger Jack Dempsey on July 4, 1919 in Toledo, Ohio. After the loss, Willard's boxing career came to a close and he pursued a new profession in movies and vaudeville shows. On December 15, 1968, Willard passed away at the age of eighty-six in Los Angeles, California.


Jess Willard

Jess Willard
Date: Between 1910 and 1920
This photograph shows Jess Willard standing with a group of men. Willard, a native of Pottawatomie County, Kansas, became the world heavyweight boxing champion on April 5, 1915, when he defeated defending champion Jack Johnson in a twenty-six round match in Havana, Cuba. The "Pottawatomie Giant" as Willard was known in the boxing world, had a career of twenty-five wins, but was unable to defend his title to challenger Jack Dempsey on July 4, 1919 in Toledo, Ohio. After the loss, Willard's boxing career came to a close and he pursued a new profession in movies and vaudeville shows. On December 15, 1968, Willard passed away at the age of eighty-six in Los Angeles, California.


Jess Willard

Jess Willard
Date: Between 1910s and 1920s
This black and white photograph shows Jess Willard (1888-1968). Willard a native of Pottawatomie County, Kansas, became the world heavyweight boxing champion on April 5, 1915, when he defeated defending champion Jack Johnson in a twenty-six round match in Havana, Cuba. The "Pottawatomie Giant" as Willard was called, had a career of twenty-five wins but was unable to defend his title to challenger Jack Dempsey on July 4, 1919 in Toledo, Ohio. After the loss, Willard's boxing career came to a close and he pursued a new profession in movies and vaudeville shows. On December 15, 1968, Willard died at the age of 86 in Los Angeles, California.


Jess Willard

Jess Willard
Date: Between 1910 and 1919
This photograph shows Jess Willard,(1888-1968). Willard a native of Pottawatomie County, Kansas, became the world heavyweight boxing champion on April 5, 1915, when he defeated defending champion Jack Johnson in a twenty-six round match in Havana, Cuba. The "Pottawatomie Giant" as Willard was known in the boxing world, had a career of twenty-five wins, but was unable to defend his title to challenger Jack Dempsey on July 4, 1919 in Toledo, Ohio. After the loss, Willard's boxing career came to a close and he pursued a new profession in movies and vaudeville shows. On December 15, 1968, Willard passed away at the age of eighty-six in Los Angeles, California.


Jess Willard's boxing shorts

Jess Willard's boxing shorts
Date: between 1911 and 1923
Heavyweight boxing champion Jess Willard wore these silk shorts between 1911 and 1923. Born in Pottawatomi County, Kansas in 1881, Willard was crowned world champion in 1915, defeating Jack Johnson in a controversial boxing match. Willard held the title for four years.


John Henry Kuck, Track and Field Olympian

John Henry Kuck, Track and Field Olympian
Date: Between 1926 and 1928
This black and white photograph shows Olympic champion John Henry Kuck, (1906-1986). Born in Wilson, Kansas, he set over a hundred records during his athletic career in the discus, javelin and shot put. Kuck held the national high school record in the shot put as a student at Wilson High School. He went on to a successful collegiate career at the Kansas State Teachers College in Emporia, Kansas. In 1926, he became the national collegiate champion in the shot put and javelin. In addition to holding the world record in the shot put, Kuck was one of the first athletes to throw a 16-pound shot over 50 feet. He represented the United States in the 1928 summer Olympics held in the Netherlands where Kuck won the gold medal in the men's shot put. His wining throw broke the previous world record by 13 inches. After the Olympics, in 1929, Kuck became the assistant track and field coach at the University of Kansas. He later moved to Idaho to work in the timber and mining business. For sixteen years he also owned and operated a resort in the Idaho area before moving back to Wilson, Kansas, in October of 1972, with this wife Lida Cooper Wilson. On September 21, 1986, the state's first Olympic gold medallist and 1961 Kansas Sports Hall of Fame inductee passed away at the age of eighty-one in Wilson, Kansas.


Kansas City Monarchs

Kansas City Monarchs
Date: July 04, 1934
This black and white photograph shows members of the Kansas City Monarchs baseball team at National Park in Washington state. The franchise was organized in 1920 and located in Kansas City, Missouri. It became the longest running Negro League team in the United States before disbanding in 1965. The players have been indentified by their respected rows. Back row: left to right; Frank Duncan, Sr., Andy Cooper, Charles "Hooks" Beverly, Chet Brewer, Sam Crawford, John Donaldson, George Giles, T.J. Young. Front row: left to right; Eddie Dwight, Newt Allen, Wilber "Bullet" Rogan, Hurley McNair, and Newt Joseph


Kansas City Monarchs

Kansas City Monarchs
Date: Between 1930 and 1939
This black and white photograph shows Kansas Monarchs' trainer James Floyd, commonly know as Jew Baby Floyd, wearing the baseball team's uniform.


Kansas City Monarchs

Kansas City Monarchs
Date: Between 1930 and 1939
This black and white photograph shows members of the Kansas City Monarchs baseball team. The franchise was organized in 1920 and located in Kansas City, Missouri. It became the longest running Negro League team in the United States before disbanding in 1965.


Los Angeles Royal Giants

Los Angeles Royal Giants
Date: 1929
This black and white photograph shows members of the Los Angeles Royal Giants baseball team. These players may have been a part of a winter league that played in California, Texas, Florida, and Hot Springs, Arkansas. Some of the players are wearing uniforms from their regular season because the owners of the Los Angeles team would not likely pay for new jerseys. The players have been identified as: (back row, left to right) owner Lonnie Goodwin, Andy Cooper, Crush Holloway, Neil Pullen, L.D. Livingston, T.J. Young, and Bliz Mackey; (front row, left to right) Dink Mothell, Wilber "Bullet" Rogan, unknown, Newt Allen, and Newt Joseph.


Ralph Houk

Ralph Houk
Date: 1962
Photograph of Ralph George Houk, born 1919 in Lawrence, Kansas, who succeeded Casey Stengel as manager of the New York Yankees from 1961 to 1963. Under Houk's management, the Yankees won the 1961 and 1962 World Series championships, and three consecutive American League pennants, with star baseball players Whitey Ford, Mickey Mantle, and Roger Maris.


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