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Annie (Le Porte) Diggs

Annie (Le Porte) Diggs
Creator: Snyder
Date: Between 1890 and 1899
A portrait of Annie (Le Porte) Diggs, who was born in 1848 in Canada to an American mother and French father. Two years later the family moved to New Jersey, where she attended school. Diggs moved to Lawrence, Kansas, in 1873 and married Alvin S. Diggs shortly thereafter. While in Kansas, Diggs began to attend the local Unitarian Church and developed a strong sense of moral responsibility that prompted her to work for temperance and women's suffrage. During 1882, Diggs and her husband published the newspaper Kansas Liberal, and beginning in 1890 she was the associate editor of the Alliance Advocate. As a radical reformer seeking to wipe out injustice, Diggs also allied herself with the Farmer's Alliance, aiding in the creation of the People's (Populist) Party, serving on the Populist National Committee, and supporting the fusion of the Populist and Democratic parties in the 1898 election. Throughout this time she continued to work actively for women's voting rights and served in the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association. In 1898, she was appointed the state librarian of Kansas, and she was also elected president of Kansas Press Women in 1905. Diggs moved to New York City in 1906, where she worked on two publications: The Story of Jerry Simpson (1908) and Bedrock (1912). She relocated to Detroit, Michigan, in 1912 and died there on September 7, 1916.


Arthur Capper

Arthur Capper
Date: 1945-1950
This photograph shows U.S. Senator Arthur Capper in front of a microphone with a script on the table near the end of his term as Senator which he held from 1919 to 1949 after being Kansas Governor from 1915 to 1919.


Arthur Capper

Arthur Capper
Date: 1918
Portrait of Arthur Capper, 1865-1951, shown here at the age of fifty-three. Capper, a native of Garnett, Kansas, served Kansas as Governor from 1915 to 1919, and as U. S. Senator from 1919 to 1949.


Arthur Capper

Arthur Capper
Date: Between 1890 and 1895
This is a portrait of Arthur Capper, 1865-1951, as a young man. Capper, a native of Garnett, Kansas, served Kansas as Governor, 1915-1919, and as U. S. Senator, 1919-1949.


Arthur Capper

Arthur Capper
Date: February 23, 1917
An informal portrait of Kansas Governor Arthur Capper, 1865-1951, signing the "Bone Dry Law" passed by the Kansas Legislature. The law prohibited possession of liquor within the state and ended direct shipments of liquor to Kansas from out-of-state vendors. Capper, a native of Garnett, Kansas, served Kansas as Governor from 1915 to 1919, and as a U. S. Senator from 1919 to 1949.


Benjamin Smith Hibbs

Benjamin Smith Hibbs
Date: Between 1940 and 1945
A photograph of Benjamin Smith Hibbs who grew up in Pretty Prairie, Kansas. He graduated from K. U. in 1923. The following year Hibbs was hired as a teacher at Fort Hays State College, where he founded their department of journalism. Between 1926 and 1929, he edited several Kansas newspapers and earned a reputation as one of Kansas' outstanding editors. At the age of 27, Curtis Publications of Philadelphia offered him the job of associate editor of their national monthly magazine, Country Gentleman. In 1940 he was made editor-in-chief of the magazine. In 1942 Curtis executives asked Hibbs to take over the editorship of their faltering weekly, the Saturday Evening Post. During the 20 years he edited the magazine, he modernized its contents, style, and format and doubled its circulation to 7 million by 1961. In 1942 it was Ben Hibbs who published Norman Rockwell's now famous illustrations of the Four Freedoms. In 1962 Hibbs resigned from the Post to become editor of Reader's Digest, a position he held until his retirement in 1972.


Capper Publications automatic camera, Topeka, Kansas

Capper Publications automatic camera, Topeka, Kansas
Date: Between 1940 and 1950
This photograph shows two men standing next to an autmatic camera at Capper Publications in Topeka, Shawnee County, Kansas.


Charles Patrick (Pat)  Roberts

Charles Patrick (Pat) Roberts
Date: 1996
A portrait of Charles Patrick (Pat) Roberts, born April 20, 1936, in Topeka, Kansas. After graduating from Kansas State University in 1958, Roberts served in the United States Marine Corps for four years and then worked as a reporter and editor for several Arizona newspapers. He joined the staff of United States Senator Frank Carlson in 1967. In 1969, Roberts became Administrative Assistant to U.S. Congressman Keith Sebelius. Roberts was elected to Congress in 1980, succeeding Sebelius upon his retirement. He was first elected to the U. S. Senate in 1996 following the retirement of Senator Nancy Kassebaum Baker and own-election in 2002.


Clarina Irene Howard Nichols

Clarina Irene Howard Nichols
Date: between 1855 and 1861
Portrait of Clarina Irene Howard Nichols, 1810-1885. Nichols and her husband settled in Quindaro, Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory, where she was active in politics and women's rights. Nichols attended the Wyandotte Constitutional Convention in 1859, where she secured for Kansas women liberal property rights, equal guardianship of their children, and the right to vote on all school questions. Susan B. Anthony paid tribute to Clarina Nichols in her book, "History of Woman Suffrage."


Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday
Creator: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: October 7, 1855
Cyrus K. Holliday, founder of Topeka, Kansas Territory, advised his wife in Meadville, Pennsylvania concerning travel. He restated advice from his much longer letter of September 26th. He wrote of his nomination, yet to be confirmed by vote, as a delegate to the Topeka Constitutional Convention. Holliday decided to decline the editorship of The Kansas Freeman. He expressed sympathy for Lizzie Holliday, his wife's sister, and suggested boarding when Mary Holliday and their daughter Lillie arrived, as he had not yet built a house.


Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday
Creator: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: September 10, 1855
Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from Topeka, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania, in good health, though others in Topeka were ill. He wanted Mary to join him, but when and with whom were undecided. He foresaw accepting the editorship of The Kansas Freeman, founded by Edward C. K. Garvey, and acquiring a farm. To Cyrus' disappointment, not he but Governor Reeder was nominated as the Kansas Territory delegate to Congress. He closed by inquiring after Lizzie and friends in Meadville.


Edmund Gibson Ross

Edmund Gibson Ross
Creator: Cobb,
Edmund Gibson Ross was active in Kansas Territory politics and served as a delegate to the Wyandotte Constitutional Convention. He and his brother, William W. Ross, were editors of the "Kansas Tribune" in Topeka, Shawnee County, Kansas Territory. Ross served as the U. S. Senator from Kansas from 1866 to 1871.


Edward Russell

Edward Russell
Date: Around 1865
This is a portrait of Edward Russell, a newspaperman and politician. He came to Kansas Territory in 1856, and located in Elwood, in Doniphan County, Kansas. Shortly after moving to Kansas, Russell started a newspaper that espoused the free-state side. In August, 1858, he lobbied Doniphan county citizens against the Lecompton Constitution. In that same year, Russell, D. W. Wilder and others founded a free-state paper. Russell later served in the Kansas legislature, and held several state offices.


Edward Wallis Hoch

Edward Wallis Hoch
Date: Between 1905 and 1909
This cabinet card shows the seventeenth governor of Kansas, Edward Wallis Hoch. Prior to being electing to office, Hoch was an editor from Marion, Kansas.


Emanuel Haldeman-Julius

Emanuel Haldeman-Julius
Date: 1925
An informal postcard portrait of social activist and Girard, Kansas publisher Emanuel Haldeman-Julius with lawyer Clarence Darrow. The young woman shown standing between them may be his wife, Marcet Haldeman-Julius.


Emporia Gazette newspaper office in Emporia, Kansas

Emporia Gazette newspaper office in Emporia, Kansas
Date: 1924-1976
Photographs of the Emporia Gazette newspaper office in Emporia, Kansas.


Eugene Ware correspondence

Eugene Ware correspondence
Date: 1871-1939
This is a series of correspondence to and from Eugene Fitch Ware (1841-1911). Ware moved to Fort Scott, Kansas, after the Civil War and became employed at the Fort Scott Monitor. In 1879, Ware began the first of three terms in the Kansas State Senate. During his terms of office, Ware introduced bills concerning railroads, life insurance, militia, and relief and support of the poor as well as bills of a more local nature. Ware moved to Topeka in 1893 to become a partner with Charles Gleed and his brother, James, forming the law firm of Gleed, Ware and Gleed. In addition to journalism, law, and politics, Ware used the pseudonym, Ironquill, for his literary and poetic achievements. His works include "Neutralia" and "The Rhymes of Ironquill". For a complete contents list of the papers of Eugene Fitch Ware, see the External Links below.


Everett Ray Call interviews

Everett Ray Call interviews
Creator: Call, Everett Ray, 1932 -
Date: 2007
Three interviews with former Emporia Gazette editor Everett Ray Call conducted by Emporia State University professor Loren E. Pennington. The first interview addresses Call's boyhood days in Sedan, Kansas, his early days as a newspaper photographer, and his commentary on William Allen White. The second interview continues Call's comments on William Allen White and follows with his commentary and analysis of the Emporia Gazette under William Lindsay White as editor and publisher. The third interview covers events of his own career with the Gazette, including famous murder cases, local, state, and national politics, and the newspaper's relations with Emporia State University and its presidents and with the Emporia Chamber of Commerce.


Fellow Citizens--In Support of the Wyandotte Constitution

Fellow Citizens--In Support of the Wyandotte Constitution
Creator: Martin, John Alexander, 1839-1889
Date: July, 1859
This eleven-page document is a speech or essay, most likely in John Alexander Martin's handwriting, delivered in support of the proposed Wyandotte Constitution that was ratified by the voters of the territory on October 4, 1859. Martin, a twenty-year-old Atchison editor, served as secretary for the convention, which finished its work at the end of July. This speech, attacking the Democrats for conspiring to defeat the latest free-state constitution and for "the Lecomptonizing of Kansas," was undoubtedly delivered several times during the months of August and September, 1859. It addressed the various issues opponents were likely to use to defeat the constitution at the polls and stressed that, in light of actions of "a servile judiciary," slavery could not be removed from Kansas until it was admitted as a "sovereign state."


George W. Brown to Fowler

George W. Brown to Fowler
Creator: Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915
Date: May 13, 1856
George Washington Brown, editor of the "Herald of Freedom" newspaper, was one of seven free state leaders arrested on May 14, 1856, on charges of high treason and held prisoner by federal troops near Lecompton, Kansas Territory. In this letter, written from Kansas City, Missouri, to his friend, Fowler, on the day before his arrest, Brown expresses concern that his life could be in danger. He encloses an outline for a "Documentary History of Kansas," and asks Fowler to publish a book based upon the outline.


George W. Brown to Sarah H. Brown

George W. Brown to Sarah H. Brown
Creator: Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915
Date: May 13, 1856
George Washington Brown, editor of the "Herald of Freedom" newspaper, was one of seven free-state leaders arrested on May 14, 1856, on charges of high treason and held prisoner by federal troops near Lecompton, Kansas Territory. Writing to his mother on the day before his arrest, Brown expresses concern that his life could be in danger. He instructes his mother to use his estate to provide support for the "Herald of Freedom."


George Wahington Martin

George Wahington Martin
Date: Between 1900 and 1914
Theses series of photographs show George Washington Martin (1841-1914) at a unidentified location. In 1857 Martin migrated to the Kansas Territory from Pennsylvania settling in Lecompton, Kansas where he worked with the pro-slavery paper the Lecompton Union, later becoming the National Democrat. Martin later established himself as a newspaper editor and publisher founding the Junction City Union. Actively involved in the community, Martin held several public offices from mayor of Junction City to serving in the Kansas House of Representatives. In 1888 he moved to Kansas City, Kansas, establishing the Daily Gazette newspaper. Martin was the managing editor of the newspaper until 1899 when he is elected secretary of the Kansas Historical Society (KSHS). Martin held this position for fifteen years and was appointed secretary emeritus of KSHS in February 1914. He passed away on March 27, 1914 in Topeka, Kansas.


George Washington Brown

George Washington Brown
Creator: Medlar
Date: Between 1890 and 1899
A photograph of George Washington Brown, who in the autumn of 1854 moved to Lawrence, Kansas Territory where he settled with a group of New England emigrants. By October of that year he had constructed a building and became editor of one of the first free-state newspapers in the territory, the Herald of Freedom, the organ of the New England Emigrant Aid Company. The newspaper angered the proslavery forces in the territory. On May 21, 1856, a proslavery posse led by the notorious Douglas County sheriff, Samuel J. Jones arrested Brown and sacked and burned Lawrence. Brown spent four months incarcerated following an indictment by a proslavery grand jury for high treason. Later his case was dismissed without trial for want of cause for prosecution. He returned to Lawrence to rebuild his business and resume the publication of the Herald of Freedom. In the capacity of editor he served until the last issue of the newspaper on December 17, 1859. Brown's interests included the founding of the city of Emporia and oil. In 1860 Brown drilled three wells in Miami County and began to extract oil. He finally decided to leave Kansas in 1865 for the more lucrative oil fields of Pennsylvania. His stay in Pennsylvania was brief, however, and by the end of the year he had journeyed to Rockford, Illinois, where he decided to take up permanent residence. Brown died there on February 5, 1915, at the age of ninety-four.


George Washington Brown

George Washington Brown
Date: Between 1856 and 1860
A portrait of George Washington Brown, who in the autumn of 1854 moved to Lawrence, Kansas Territory where he settled with a group of New England emigrants. By October of that year he had constructed a building and became editor of one of the first free-state newspapers in the territory, the Herald of Freedom, the organ of the New England Emigrant Aid Company. The newspaper angered the proslavery forces in the territory. On May 21, 1856, a proslavery posse led by the notorious Douglas County sheriff, Samuel J. Jones arrested Brown and sacked and burned Lawrence. Brown spent four months incarcerated following an indictment by a proslavery grand jury for high treason. Later his case was dismissed without trial for want of cause for prosecution. He returned to Lawrence to rebuild his business and resume the publication of the Herald of Freedom. In the capacity of editor he served until the last issue of the newspaper on December 17, 1859. Brown's interests included the founding of the city of Emporia and oil. In 1860 Brown drilled three wells in Miami County and began to extract oil. He finally decided to leave Kansas in 1865 for the more lucrative oil fields of Pennsylvania. His stay in Pennsylvania was brief, however, and by the end of the year he had journeyed to Rockford, Illinois, where he decided to take up permanent residence. Brown died there on February 5, 1915, at the age of ninety-four.


George Washington Brown to Eli Thayer

George Washington Brown to Eli Thayer
Creator: Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915
Date: June 4, 1856
George Washington Brown, editor of the Herald of Freedom newspaper, was one of seven free state leaders arrested on May 14, 1856 on charges of high treason and held prisoner by federal troops near Lecompton. G. W. Brown described the sack of Lawrence and the destruction of his printing press, commented upon the harshness of his prison conditions, and asked Eli Thayer to do anything in his power to help secure his release.


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