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Annual Report to the American Missionary Association

Annual Report to the American Missionary Association
Creator: Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898
Date: 1858
This draft report, written by Samuel L. Adair, covers the year 1857 and also describes the organization of the Congregational Church in Osawatomie, Kansas Territory. Samuel L. Adair was preaching at a number of rural churches in the area. It reports on membership, attendance, and other religious activities. He also mentions the activities of other denominations in the area.


C. G. Dick to Samuel L. Adair

C. G. Dick to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Dick, Campbell Graham
Date: April 21, 1857
Campbell G. Dick was Reverend Adair's brother-in-law, and wrote from his home in Marshall, Highland County, Ohio, that he supported the American Missionary Association as it promoted Christianity, but was pessimistic about the chances for Kansas Territory entering the Union as a free state. He wrote that the Democratic party was controlled by the south, and asked Adair to inform him if free state men intended to vote in the elections called by the "Bogus Legislature."


Charles A. Richard

Charles A. Richard
Date: Between 1920 and 1929
This is a photograph of Charles A. Richard. He married Lula Jerusha Ford on September 14, 1902, and they had four sons: Glen U. (born May 9, 1905), Quentin L. (born June 25, 1907), Wilbur O. (born December 19, 1910), and Charles A, Jr. (born May 14, 1916). Charles A. Richard was a minister and lecturer in Seneca, Nemaha County, Kansas. Later, he was a minister at the First Christian Church in Lawrence, Kansas. Also, he was a Republican and served in the Kansas State Senate in 1937, SS1938, and 1939 representing District 17.


Charles A. Richard

Charles A. Richard
Date: 1945
This is a photograph of Charles A. Richard. He married Lula Jerusha Ford on September 14, 1902, and they had four sons: Glen U. (born May 9, 1905), Quentin L. (born June 25, 1907), Wilbur O. (born December 19, 1910), and Charles A, Jr. (born May 14, 1916). Charles A. Richard was a minister and lecturer in Seneca, Nemaha County, Kansas. Later, he was a minister at the First Christian Church in Lawrence, Kansas. Also, he was a Republican and served in the Kansas State Senate in 1937, SS1938, and 1939 representing District 17.


Charles A. Richard and Lula Jerusha Ford Richard

Charles A. Richard and Lula Jerusha Ford Richard
Date: Between 1902 and 1905
This is a photograph of Charles A. Richard and Lula Jerusha Richard. She was the daughter of Joseph and Sarah Ford and they settled in Nemaha County, Kansas. Charles and Lula were married September 14, 1902, and they had four sons: Glen U. (born May 9, 1905), Quentin L. (born June 25, 1907), Wilbur O. (born December 19, 1910), and Charles A, Jr. (born May 14, 1916). Charles A. Richard was a minister and lecturer in Seneca, Nemaha County, Kansas. Later, he was a minister at the First Christian Church in Lawrence, Kansas. Also, he was a Republican and served in the Kansas State Senate in 1937, SS1938, and 1939 representing District 17.


Charles Monroe Sheldon

Charles Monroe Sheldon
Creator: Samarjian's Studio
Date: Between 1900 and 1910
This is a photograph of Rev. Charles Monroe Sheldon, pastor of Central Congregational Church in Topeka, Kansas. He organized the Tennessee Town Kindergarten, which is the first black kindergarten west of the Mississippi River. Rev. Sheldon is best known for his novel "In His Steps" or "What Would Jesus Do?"


Charles Monroe Sheldon

Charles Monroe Sheldon
Date: Between 1900 and 1920
Charles Monroe Sheldon, pastor of Central Congregational Church in Topeka, Kansas, organized the first Black kindergarten west of the Mississippi River. It was known as the Tennesseetown Kindergarten. He is best known for his novel "In His Steps" or "What Would Jesus Do?"


Charles Monroe Sheldon

Charles Monroe Sheldon
Date: Between 1900 and 1910
This is a photograph of Rev. Charles Monroe Sheldon, pastor of Central Congregational Church in Topeka, Kansas. He organized the Tennessee Town Kindergarten, which is the first black kindergarten west of the Mississippi River. Rev. Sheldon is best known for his novel "In His Steps" or "What Would Jesus Do?"


Charles Monroe Sheldon

Charles Monroe Sheldon
Creator: Clark, E. J.
Date: 1900
This is a photograph of Rev. Charles Monroe Sheldon, pastor of Central Congregational Church in Topeka, Kansas. He organized the Tennessee Town Kindergarten, which is the first black kindergarten west of the Mississippi River. Rev. Sheldon is best known for his novel "In His Steps" or "What Would Jesus Do?"


Daniel L. Chandler to John Stillman Brown

Daniel L. Chandler to John Stillman Brown
Creator: Chandler, Daniel L.
Date: April 26, 1862
A letter written by Daniel L. Chandler from Mound City, Kansas, to John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. Chandler described promotions and staff changes in the regiments at Mound City, as well as a petition to prevent his removal as hospital steward. Chandler also wrote of the deaths of soldiers and a new order that would discharge soldiers who spent two months in the hospital.


Daniel L. Chandler to John Stillman Brown

Daniel L. Chandler to John Stillman Brown
Creator: Chandler, Daniel L.
Date: April 22, 1862
This letter was written by Daniel L. Chandler from Paola, Kansas, to John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. The first portion of Chandler's letter describes a young soldier named James, apparently recuperating from illness and under Brown's care and supervision in Lawrence. Chandler speaks of promotions and new officers in the army and his contentment with his "humble position" as hospital steward. He also writes of his popularity with the troops and his efforts to obtain "comforts" for them.


Dr Haines' Golden Treatment

Dr Haines' Golden Treatment
Creator: Golden Specific Company
Date: between 1890 and 1900
Yellow cardboard package labeled "Dr. Haines Golden Treatment for the Liquor Habit." James Wilkins Haines was a Quaker minister, homeopathic physician, and alleged practitioner of quack medicine. Operating in Cincinnati, Ohio, in the late 19th century, Haines promoted a popular false theory that ingesting bichloride of gold cured alcoholism. Advertised as the Golden Treatment, the tablets contained benign substances and trace amounts of ipecac. Medicinal cures for alcoholism were popular during the Temperance movement.


E. B. Whitman to Samuel L. Adair

E. B. Whitman to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Whitman, E. B. (Edmund Burke), 1812-1883
Date: May 15, 1857
E. B. Whitman, located in Lawrence, was the general agent for the National Kansas Committee that was distributing relief supplies in Kansas Territory. He writes that he is sending Adair potatoes and corn to be distributed for planting. Evidently, Adair had written him previously about some boxes of supplies he expected, and Whitman speculates that some boxes might be on the steamer "Light Foot" on the Kansas River in Wyandotte, Kansas Territory, and some might be in St. Louis, Missouri.


Edmund Burke Whitman to Samuel L. Adair

Edmund Burke Whitman to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Whitman, E. B. (Edmund Burke), 1812-1883
Date: October 5, 1857
Whitman writes from (presumably) Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to ask Samuel Adair for his assistance in distributing remaining relief clothing before winter. He includes instructions for notifying the public of the availability of relief goods and indicates that whomever Adair "knows to be in absolute want" should have first priority. Whitman feels the task of distribution would not take longer than one week. He also wants Adair to estimate the number of poor families in his [Adair's] community.


G. S. Lewis to Samuel L. Adair

G. S. Lewis to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Lewis, G. S.
Date: December 12, 1856
G. S. Lewis,a friend of Samuel Adair, writes from Albany in Athens County, Ohio. Lewis was concerned about the safety of the Adair family, and commented on the trials they must be suffering. He comments on the bravery of Charley, the Adair's son who helped warn Osawatomie, Kansas Territory, of the coming of proslavery forces prior to the Battle of Osawatomie. Lewis also comments on John Brown, Gov. Geary, John Freemont, and the political situation in Kansas Territory and nationally. He shares rumors of slave insurrections in Kentucky and Tennessee.


Harvey Jones to Samuel L. Adair

Harvey Jones to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Jones, Harvey
Date: December 14, 1859
Jones, a Congregational minister who lived in Wabaunsee, Kansas Territory, wrote to Samuel L. Adair after John Brown's attack at Harpers Ferry, Virginia. Jones asked Adair to write to him about John Brown's character, and to indicate whether Brown was associated with a church.


James Garrison to Samuel L. Adair

James Garrison to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Garrison, James
Date: December 15, 1856
James Garrison writes from Antioch College in Yellow Springs, Ohio, to his cousin Samuel Adair in Kansas Territory. The letter discusses relief efforts on behalf of the free state settlers and concerns about fraud on the part of agents collecting money and goods. Garrison writes that the Cincinnati Gazette had published a long list of names of Kansas citizens who had been refused clothing by the relief society. He feels an explanation to the public was needed if the relief efforts were to be continued. The letterhead included an engraving of Antioch College. The sheet of paper also contained a letter from Gamaliel Garrison. (See item #90260.)


John Brown to Mary Brown and family

John Brown to Mary Brown and family
Creator: Brown, John, 1800-1859
Date: October 13, 1855
One week after arriving at his sons' settlement ("Brownville") near Osawatomie, Brown wrote the family back east that although most were sick when he first arrived, they "appear now to be mending." The trip across Missouri was without incident, except for problems with a sick horse and their "heavy load." Brown then wrote briefly of the Adairs, the "most uncomfortable situation" in which he found his children upon his arrival, and other things including prairie fires and finally the political situation in the territory. In fact, at this early date, John Brown "believe[d] Missouri is fast becoming discouraged about making Kansas a Slave State & think the prospect of its becoming Free is brightening every day."


John Brown to Mary Brown and family

John Brown to Mary Brown and family
Creator: Brown, John, 1800-1859
Date: February 1, 1856
From Osawatomie, Brown wrote of the continued severe winter and "the fierce Winds of Kansas," as well as his desire to visit the family at North Elba, New York. But he also mentioned that they had "just learned of some new, & shocking outrages at Leavenworth; & that the Free State people there have fled to Lawrence." Although more conflict threatened, Brown expected little action until the weather improved.


John Stillman Brown to John L. Rupur

John Stillman Brown to John L. Rupur
Creator: Brown, John Stillman, 1806-1902
Date: September 1, 1863
This letter was written by John Stillman Brown from Lawrence, Kansas, addressed to John L. Rupur. Brown gives a detailed and emotional account of William Quantrill's August 21, 1863, raid on Lawrence. Brown lists individual men and groups such as African Americans and Germans who were killed in the attack. He witnessed much of the violence from a hill above the city, and describes the destruction of life and property. Brown mentions that the town had no warning before the attack and that there was a second panic the following evening when townspeople feared another raid. He also describes how the community's churches came together for a memorial service. A complete transcription is available by clicking "Text Version" below.


John Stillman Brown to William Brown

John Stillman Brown to William Brown
Creator: Brown, John Stillman, 1806-1902
Date: February 14, 1858
A letter written from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, by John Stillman Brown, addressed to his son, William Brown, who was studying at Phillips Exeter Academy. Brown admonished his son for not writing. He discusses the cold weather and the political conditions in territorial Kansas, including his opposition to the Lecompton Constitution. Brown predicted high immigration to Kansas in the coming spring, and also predicted that "Kansas is sure to be Free" and without any slaves within two years.


Kansas Territory marriage ceremonies performed by Rev. Samuel L. Adair

Kansas Territory marriage ceremonies performed by Rev. Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898
Date: December 9, 1855, through January 1, 1861
This item lists the twenty-one marriage ceremonies Samuel L. Adair performed in Kansas Territory from 1855 to 1861. For each ceremony, Adair identified the bride and groom, the location (often a home), and the date.


Leigh R. Webber to John Stillman Brown

Leigh R. Webber to John Stillman Brown
Creator: Webber, L. R.
Date: January 23, 1862
A letter written by Leigh R. Webber from Kansas City, Missouri, addressed to John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence, Kansas. Webber begins by recounting other letters he had recently sent to members of the Brown family. He describes the march from Lexington to Kansas City and future plans to continue on to Fort Scott. Webber also discusses his father's recent death.


Leigh R. Webber to John Stillman Brown

Leigh R. Webber to John Stillman Brown
Creator: Webber, L. R.
Date: December 23, 1864
A letter written by Leigh R. Webber from Troy, Vermont, addressed to John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence, Kansas. Webber discusses Kansas politics, particularly the debate between supporters and critics of Senator James H. Lane. He also remarks on the "late successes of the Union armies," and worries that political tensions with Great Britain may escalate into another war.


Leigh R. Webber to Miss Brown

Leigh R. Webber to Miss Brown
Creator: Webber, L. R.
Date: March 8, 1862
A letter written by Leigh R. Webber from Fort Scott, Bourbon County, Kansas, to Miss Brown, a daughter of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence, Kansas. Webber describes the march from Kansas City, Missouri, to Fort Scott, Kansas, describing landmarks along the way and discussing the soldiers' state of exhaustion. He continues a discussion from a previous letter regarding his father's death. Webber also describes camp life and future plans to march on to Fort Smith.


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