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Alan, Fannie and Jack Wisman

Alan, Fannie and Jack Wisman
Date: 1975
An informal portrait of Alan, Fannie, and Jack Wisman at their Army Surplus store located at 626 South Kansas Avenue in Topeka, Kansas.


Albe Burge Whiting

Albe Burge Whiting
Creator: Leonard, J. H.
Date: Between 1900 and 1919
This cabinet card shows Albe Burge Whiting, (1835-1928). Whiting a native of Johnson, Vermont migrated to the Kansas territory in 1856 and settled near Fort Riley. He founded the town of Milford and was instrumental in operating a saw mill, general store, and flour mill before moving, in 1877, to Topeka, Kansas. In the capital city, Whiting engaged in a number of business ventures from a partnership in a drug store to owning and operating a paint and glass business. His company also held the contract to supply the windows for the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railway Company building at Ninth and Jackson Streets in Topeka. Whiting's success in business gave him the means to give back to the community. In 1907, Whiting and his wife Kate purchased 160 acres of land which established the Mt. Hope Cemetery in Topeka as a 1,000 year endowment trust for Washburn University, the Topeka Y.W.C.A. and the Topeka Y. M. C. A. In addition to the endowment, Whiting served fifty-one years as a Washburn trustee and was a member of the executive committee. To honor his years of service to the college, in June of 1930, the field house at Washburn was named the Whiting Field House. The dedication came two years after the building's completion in December of 1928 and the passing of Albe Burge Whiting.


Albe Burge Whiting

Albe Burge Whiting
Date: Between 1890 and 1900
This cabinet card shows Albe Burge Whiting,(1835-1928). Whiting a native of Johnson, Vermont migrated to the Kansas territory, in 1856, and settled near Fort Riley. He founded the town of Milford and was instrumental in operating a saw mill, general store, and flour mill before moving, in 1877, to Topeka, Kansas. In the capital city, Whiting engaged in a number of business ventures from a partnership in a drug store to owning and operating a paint and glass business. His company also held the contract to supply the windows for the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company building at Ninth and Jackson Streets in Topeka. Whiting's success in business gave him the means to give back to the community. In 1907, Whiting and his wife Kate purchased 160 acres of land which established the Mt. Hope Cemetery in Topeka, as a 1,000 year endowment trust for Washburn University, and the Topeka Y.W.C.A. and Y. M. C. A. In addition to the endowment, Whiting served fifty-one years as a Washburn trustee and was a member of the executive committee. To honor his years of service to the college, the field house at Washburn was named the Whiting Field House in June of 1930. The dedication came two years after the building's completion in December of 1928 and the passing of Albe Burge Whiting.


Albin K. Longren

Albin K. Longren
Date: Between 1910 and 1919
This black and white photograph shows inventor and aviator Albin K. Longren posing with an Indian motorcycle. The following has been written across the bottom of the photograph "Longren Clay Center, Kansas."


Alfred Mossman Landon, Kansas Governor

Alfred Mossman Landon, Kansas Governor
Creator: Hodge, L. Cady
Date: 1936
This portrait of Alfred Mossman Landon (1887-1987), represents him during his unsuccessful campaign as the Republican nominee for the 1936 Presidential campaign against President Franklin Roosevelt.


Bernhard Warkentin

Bernhard Warkentin
Date: Between 1900 and 1908
Portrait of Bernhard Warkentin, pioneer Mennonite and miller of Red Turkey wheat in Halstead and Newton, Kansas. Warkentin's greatest contribution was the introduction of hard Turkey wheat into Kansas. Also, he helped establish several large Mennonite settlements in Kansas.


Between Millstones

Between Millstones
Creator: Kelly, H. B.
Date: 1896
This short pamphlet discusses the problems that high tariffs and the gold standard create for workers and farmers. It clearly presents Populist ideas about the dire situation of Kansas farmers by giving several examples of how businessmen and merchants benefit from the oppression of common laborers. The pamphlet was written by H. B. Kelly and printed by the Jeffersonian Publishing Company in Lawrence, Kansas; each pamphlet cost five cents.


Charles Robinson to Edward Everett Hale

Charles Robinson to Edward Everett Hale
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: April 7, 1857
Charles Robinson wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Edward Everett Hale, a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company's Executive Committee. Robinson complained about the lack of respect he had received from New England Emigrant Aid Company leaders. He was particularly upset about criticisms of his financial ability. Robinson expressed anger at what he perceived as Eli Thayer's and the New England Emigrant Aid Company's opposition to the development of the town of Quindaro. Robinson included excerpts from a letter he received from James Redpath outlining Thayer's criticisms of Robinson's involvement with Quindaro.


Clyde Cessna

Clyde Cessna
Date: Unknown


Clyde Cessna

Clyde Cessna
Date: 1914
An informal portrait of Clyde Cessna, shown standing near the propeller of his 1914 airplane, and a small group of men and boys in Burdett, Kansas.


Clyde Cessna

Clyde Cessna
Date: 1916
Clyde Cessna and his 1916 airplane, the first Cessna aircraft built in Wichita, Kansas. This photo was taken at Beaver, Oklahoma, with part of the Beaver Boosters.


Clyde Cessna

Clyde Cessna
Date: 1917
This photograph shows a group of men including Clyde Cessna (4th from left) posing with the first plane built in Wichita. The image includes a description that reads "a part of the Beaver Boosters, Okla [Oklahoma]."


Clyde Cessna

Clyde Cessna
Date: 1917
This black and white photograph shows Clyde Cessna piloting his Cessna aircraft.


Concepcion, Carmen, and Rafael Lopez

Concepcion, Carmen, and Rafael Lopez
Creator: Jeffrey's
Date: Between 1963 and 1965
A formal portrait of Concepcion (Connie), Carmen, and Rafael Rocha Lopez of Wichita, Kansas. Mr. Lopez served in the Army during World War II and the Korean War, and he later worked as a civil service barber at McConnell Air Force Base in Wichita, Kansas. Beginning in 1963, the Lopez family owned and operated Connie's Mexico Cafe in Wichita, Kansas.


Concepcion and Rafael Rocha Lopez

Concepcion and Rafael Rocha Lopez
Date: Between 1945 and 1952
Portrait of Concepcion (Connie) and Rafael Rocha Lopez, who immigrated to the United States from Mexico. He served in the Army during World War II and the Korean War, and he later worked as a civil service barber at McConnell Air Force Base in Wichita, Kansas. Beginning in 1963, the couple owned and operated Connie's Mexico Cafe in Wichita, Kansas.


Cyrus Kurtz Holliday

Cyrus Kurtz Holliday
Date: Between 1855 and 1858
Portrait of Cyrus Kurtz Holliday, 1826-1900, as a young man.


Cyrus Kurtz Holliday

Cyrus Kurtz Holliday
Date: Between 1850 and 1855
A formal portrait of Cyrus Kurtz Holliday (1826-1900), of Topeka, Kansas. Holliday came to Kansas Territory in 1854 from Meadville, Pennsylvania. He was an agent for the New England Emigrant Aid Company, one of the founders of Topeka, and was the first president of the Topeka Town Association. He was very active in territorial political activities, including the Topeka movement, he was a delegate to the Topeka Constitutional Convention, and served in the Kansas State Senate in 1861. Holliday was also the first president of the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway, and served as one of the railroad's directors for nearly 40 years.


Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Alfred and Edgar Huidekoper

Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Alfred and Edgar Huidekoper
Creator: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: September 20, 1858
Cyrus K. Holliday, founder and prominent citizen of Topeka, Kansas Territory, wrote to Alfred Huidekoper and Edgar Huidekoper, old associates from Meadville, Pennsylvania, to tell them of investment opportunities. He described rural claims, Town Act investments, and loans. He gave examples of large returns, including those gained by former governor Andrew H. Reeder. The time was ripe since Kansas' free statehood seemed certain, the land was titled, securities were assured, and financial difficulties had left some land and property owners with no option but to sell sacrificially. Holliday also confirmed the discovery of gold in western Kansas Territory (now Colorado).


Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday
Creator: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: December 10, 1854
Cyrus K. Holliday, founder of Topeka, Kansas Territory, wrote from "Up the River," Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania, describing the difficult living conditions for him and the other men at the future site of Topeka, where they had been visited by Governor Andrew H. Reeder. Holliday assured his wife of his health and requested that she explain to Mr. Drew Lowry and Mr. McFarland in Pennsylvania why he had not written. He praised the beauty of the country and expressed his vision of its future, ending with a request that she write to him.


Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday
Creator: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: December 31, 1854
Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from Topeka, Kansas Territory, to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. He described living conditions in Topeka. Holliday expressed his intent to write to Mr. McFarland and his thanks for letters recently received. He mentioned Samuel Y. Lum, a Congregational minister, who was sleeping in his cabin. He also mentioned his presidency with the Topeka Town Association, agency with the New England Emigrant Aid Company, and his own business. Finally, Holliday expressed hopes of a sawmill and referred to the possibility of trouble with Missourians. A few lines have been cut and removed from the lower part of pages 7 and 8.


Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday
Creator: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: July 29, 1855
Cyrus K. Holliday wrote letters from several cities to his wife, Mary Holliday, after leaving their home at Meadville, Pennsylvania to return to business at Topeka, Kansas Territory. Once in Lawrence, K. T., he reported the political situation to his wife. Governor Andrew H. Reeder, who expected violence, and the fraudulently elected Territorial Legislature were at loggerheads. (Holliday had been elected to the Legislature in a reelection called by Governor Reeder during Holliday's absence, but the reelection results were rejected by the Legislature). Holliday also mentioned the good corn crop and warm weather and expressed his love for his wife and daughter, Lillie, born March 18.


Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday
Creator: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: April 1, 1855
Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from Topeka, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. He described the Territorial Legislature election of March 30, 1855, in which he was a Representative candidate for the Fourth District (in the third election district). Missourians had taken charge of the polls, and Holliday, along with other free state Kansas Territory citizens, did not vote. He assured his wife that Kansas would be a free state. Business in growing Topeka continued to delay his return to Meadville. Holliday also alluded to the recent birth of their child and mentioned his ragged clothing.


Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday
Creator: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: December 3, 1854
Cyrus K. Holliday, the founder of Topeka, Kansas Territory, wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. He told her of his planned trip up the Kansas River, his pleasure in the people of Kansas Territory, and a Thanksgiving dinner he attended. Unwilling to return to Pennsylvania, Holliday expressed desire that Mary come to Kansas Territory and described the construction of a friend's sod-covered "mansion," one such as Clarina I. H. Nichols, a lecturer and writer, inhabited.


Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday
Creator: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: November 18, 1854
Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. This letter was to be delivered by Mr. Ingrams, and Holliday expressed the possibilities of following shortly or of staying in Lawrence to make business arrangements and put up a building in the spring. He expressed his delight in the country of Kansas and the site of a new city (not named, but likely Topeka). A Pennsylvania company of emigrants, unprepared for the journey and now suffering, had settled in Lawrence and Council Grove.


Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday
Creator: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: January 7, 1855
Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from Topeka, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. After a loving introduction, he described Kansas Territory's sunny, breezy climate. Holliday mentioned letters received from his brother and Mr. Thomas Willson, both named in previous letters, who also wanted to emigrate. He described the principle building in Topeka, which served as meeting hall, hotel, and church, and where he slept with Frye W. Giles, a free state supporter from Chicago. Holliday ended with concern for Lizzie, Mary Holliday's younger sister.


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