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3/4-Grooved Axe from 14AT444

3/4-Grooved Axe from 14AT444
Date: 1-1000 CE
This axe was collected from a possible Early Ceramic period site in Atchison County and donated in 2018 to the Kansas Historical Society. While 3/4-grooved axes are frequently recovered from late Archaic sites, their use is not restricted to that time period. They get their name from the hafting groove that encircles 3/4 of the body of the axe. Axes like these are made by pecking a hard stone into a rough shape and then grinding and polishing it into its final state.


3/4 Grooved Axe from 14WY308

3/4 Grooved Axe from 14WY308
Date: 1-1500 CE
This 3/4 grooved axe was collected from a multicomponent site in Wyandotte County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1973. While 3/4 grooved axes are frequently recovered from late Archaic sites, their use is not restricted to that time period. They get their name from the hafting groove that encircles 3/4 of the body of the axe. Axes like these are made by pecking a hard stone into a rough shape and then grinding and polishing it into its final state.


3/4 Grooved Axe from Douglas County

3/4 Grooved Axe from Douglas County
Date: Unknown
This 3/4 grooved axe was collected in Douglas County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1923. While 3/4 grooved axes are frequently recovered from late Archaic sites, their use is not restricted to that time period. Axes like these are made by pecking a hard stone into a rough shape and then grinding and polishing it into its final state. They get their name from the hafting groove the encircles 3/4 of its body.


3/4 Grooved Axe from Geary County

3/4 Grooved Axe from Geary County
Date: Unknown
This 3/4 grooved axe was found in Geary County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1963. While 3/4 grooved axes are frequently recovered from late Archaic sites, their use is not restricted to that time period. Axes like these are made by pecking a hard stone into a rough shape and then grinding and polishing it into its final state. They get their name from the hafting groove the encircles 3/4 of its body.


3/4 Grooved Axe from the Collins Site, 14DP1306

3/4 Grooved Axe from the Collins Site, 14DP1306
Date: Unknown
The 3/4 grooved axe shown here was donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1979. It was collected from an archeological site in Doniphan County with multiple occupations. While 3/4 grooved axes are frequently recovered from late Archaic sites, there use is not restricted to that time period. Axes like these are made by pecking a hard stone into a rough shape and then grinding and polishing it into its final state. The groove would have been used to haft the axe to the handle.


3/4 Grooved Axe from the Plowboy Site, 14SH372

3/4 Grooved Axe from the Plowboy Site, 14SH372
Date: 2000 BCE-1850 CE
This 3/4 grooved axe was collected from the Plowboy site in Shawnee County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 2017. The Plowboy site was home to the Kansa, the Potawatomi, and Euro-Americans. At various times, the site contained a farm, a trading post, and a post office with nearby military trails, Mormon routes, a railroad and the California-Oregon trail. Before all of this activity, other American Indians also occupied the site and created this groundstone axe. Axes like these are made by pecking a hard stone into a rough shape and then grinding and polishing it into its final state. They get their name from the hafting groove the encircles 3/4 of its body.


3/4 Grooved Axe from the Stricker Site, 14DP1319

3/4 Grooved Axe from the Stricker Site, 14DP1319
Date: Unknown
This 3/4 grooved axe was collected from a multicomponent archeological site in Doniphan County and donated in 2018 to the Kansas Historical Society. The site had occupations from the Archaic through the Historic periods. The axe was from one of the older time periods. While 3/4 grooved axes are frequently recovered from late Archaic sites, their use is not restricted to that time period. Axes like this one are made by pecking a hard stone into a rough shape and then grinding and polishing it into its final state and get their name from the hafting groove the encircles 3/4 of its body.


3/4 Grooved Axes from the Dickerson Site, 14AT346

3/4 Grooved Axes from the Dickerson Site, 14AT346
Date: Unknown
Little is known regarding these 3/4 grooved axes from the Dickerson site in Atchison County. They were donated in 1878 to the Kansas Historical Society. While 3/4 grooved axes are frequently recovered from late Archaic sites, their use is not restricted to that time period. Axes like these are made by pecking a hard stone into a rough shape and then grinding and polishing it into its final state. They get their name from the hafting groove the encircles 3/4 of the body.


Adze from Blue Earth Village, 14PO24

Adze from Blue Earth Village, 14PO24
Date: 1790-1830 CE
This adze was used for cutting and shaping wood. It was collected from Blue Earth village and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1880. Blue Earth village was a Kansa Indian village in Pottawatomie County. Many lodge depressions were still visible on the surface in the 1880s.


Adze or Axe from the Country Club Site, 14CO3

Adze or Axe from the Country Club Site, 14CO3
Date: 1400-1725 CE
This chipped stone tool, either an adze or an axe, was most likely used for woodworking. It was excavated from a Great Bend aspect village site (ancestral Wichita) in Cowley County during Phase IV archeological investigations in 1995. The site had been much impacted by a water line, golf greens, roads, and highways. Excavations had been occurring at the site since 1916.


Adze or Axe from the Curry Site, 14GR301

Adze or Axe from the Curry Site, 14GR301
Date: 1200-1400 CE
This chipped stone tool, possibly either an adze or an axe, was most likely used for woodworking. It was donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1984. The Curry site in Greenwood County was a multicomponent (multiple occupations) site occupied periodically during the Archaic, Early Ceramic and Middle Ceramic Periods.


Adze or Axe from the Wullschleger Site, 14MH301

Adze or Axe from the Wullschleger Site, 14MH301
Date: 1-1800 CE
This chipped stone tool, made of Florence chert that outcrops in the Flint Hills of Kansas and Oklahoma, may have been used as an adze or axe. Artifacts like this one were likely used for wood working. It was collected from the Wullscheleger site in Marshall County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1961. The site was occupied periodically throughout the Early, Middle and Late Ceramic periods.


Adze or Axe from the Wullschleger Site, 14MH301

Adze or Axe from the Wullschleger Site, 14MH301
Date: 1-1800 CE
This chipped stone tool, made of Florence chert that outcrops in the Flint Hills of Kansas and Oklahoma, may have been used as an adze or an axe used for wood working. It was collected from the Wullscheleger site in Marshall County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1961. The site was occupied periodically throughout the Early, Middle and Late Ceramic periods.


Arrow Shaft Wrench from the Thompson Site, 14RC9

Arrow Shaft Wrench from the Thompson Site, 14RC9
Date: 1500-1800 CE
This bone arrow shaft wrench was recovered from the Thompson site in Rice County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1963. Arrow shaft wrenches were used to straighten a warped arrow shaft. This wrench was made on the left tibia of a deer. The site, listed in the National Register of Historic Places, was a Great Bend aspect village occupied by ancestral Wichita people.


Ax

Ax
Date: between 1900 and 1904
Iron and oak felling ax marked along one side: "This axe used by Blanche Boise in smashing the glass cover to picture of Custer's Last Fight." Topeka resident Blanch Boise was a follower of the nationally recognized temperance advocate Carry Nation. Boise was known for violent acts directed at entities associated with the illegal consumption of alcohol. On January 9, 1904, Boise entered the Kansas State Historical Society rooms in the Kansas Statehouse and attacked a framed Anheuser-Busch advertisement depicting a print of Cassilly Adam's famous painting, "Custer's Last Fight," found on Kansas Memory with the Item Number of 305138. Boise was arrested and incarcerated that night. Working in conjunction with Carry Nation, Boise later continued her temperance work by smashing the glass fronts of four Topeka saloons and two drugstores.


Axe Head from Fool Chief's Village, 14SH305

Axe Head from Fool Chief's Village, 14SH305
Date: 1830-1844 CE
This axe head was recovered from Fool Chief's Village, a Kansa village in Shawnee County that was the site of the 2012 Kansas Archeology Training Program, though excavations continued through 2012 and 2013. As this axe shows evidence of battering on the top, it may have been used as an anvil. The axe head was cleaned by electrolysis which passes an electrical current through a liquid solution to separate the rust from the artifact.


Axe Head from the Adair Cabin, 14MM327

Axe Head from the Adair Cabin, 14MM327
Date: 1855-1912
This axe head was recovered during excavations in 2014 of the Adair cabin site, home of Reverend Samuel and Florella Brown Adair and their family, in Osawatomie, Kansas. Osawatomie and the Adairs were much involved with the abolitionist movement during the "Bleeding Kansas" years. The Western or Wisconsin style axe head has a faint manufacturer's mark. It is 22.5 cm long with one bit end measuring 11.9 cm and the other 11.1 cm.


Axe Head from the Neodesha Fort Site, 14WN1

Axe Head from the Neodesha Fort Site, 14WN1
Date: 1650-1800
This axe head was collected from a Great Bend aspect site in Wilson County and donated in 1984 to the Kansas Historical Society. The site had a mix of both prehistoric and historic artifacts. This axe head is from the historic period and was cleaned by electrolysis which passes an electrical current through a liquid solution to separate the rust from the artifact. The Neodesha Fort site was first investigated by archeologists in 1954, and was associated with many lodge depressions and at one time had an U-shaped earthwork.


Axe or Celt from the Trowbridge Site, 14WY1

Axe or Celt from the Trowbridge Site, 14WY1
Date: 1-250 CE
This partial axe or celt was found at the Trowbridge archeological site in Wyandotte County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1973. Trowbridge is a Kansas City Hopewell site from the Early Ceramic Period. During this time archeologists find evidence of houses, cultivated plants, and decorated pottery. Without the poll end of the artifact it is impossible to tell if it was an axe or a celt. Either way, this woodworking tool would have been made by grinding or pecking it into a general shape followed by polishing. It would have been hafted onto a handle and required periodic resharpening.


Belt Style Axe from Fool Chief's Village, 14SH305

Belt Style Axe from Fool Chief's Village, 14SH305
Date: 1830-1844 CE
This is a belt style axe recovered from a midden (refuse heap) in Fool Chief's Village. Fool Chief's Village, a Kansa village in Shawnee County, was the site of the 2012 Kansas Archeology Training Program field school, though excavations continued through 2012 and 2013. Belt style axes were common English and French fur trade items and were forged from a single band of iron folded in half and hammer welded together at the blade. An opening was left at the bend of the fold for the handle of the axe. As this axe shows evidence of battering on the top, it may have been used as an anvil.


Belt Style Axe from Hard Chief's Village, 14SH301

Belt Style Axe from Hard Chief's Village, 14SH301
Date: 1830-1847 CE
This axe was recovered at excavations at Hard Chief's Village during the 1987 Kansas Archeology Training Program. Hard Chief's village was occupied by the Kansa. Belt style axes were common English and French fur trade items and were forged from a single band of iron folded in half and hammer welded together at the blade. An opening was left at the bend of the fold for the handle of the axe. This axe was cleaned by electrolysis which passes an electrical current through a liquid solution to separate the rust from the artifact.


Bungstart

Bungstart
Date: between 1880 and 1930
Oak bungstart with bowed handle and detachable head. This bungstart served as a mallet to remove corks (bungs) from a beer keg.


Carry Nation's broadax

Carry Nation's broadax
Creator: William Beatty & Son
Date: 1901
This steel broad ax was given to Carry A. Nation, a devout Christian and nationally recognized temperance advocate. Nation, a resident of Medicine Lodge, Kansas, achieved infamy for attacking saloons with a hatchet to discourage drinking and was frequently jailed for vandalism. In January 1901, Nation embarked on a highly publicized trip to Topeka, Kansas, to attend a meeting of the Kansas Temperance Union. During her trip, she assaulted multiple saloons while brandishing axes. According to Robert Scott, an employee of a Kansas Avenue hardware store, Nation entered the store during a raid on a nearby saloon and asked, "Mr. Scott, have you a hatchet I could use?" Scott provided Nation with this axe. William Beatty and Son, a long-established tool company located in Chester, Pennsylvania, produced the axe.


Celt from 14AT410

Celt from 14AT410
Date: 1-1000 CE
This celt was recovered from the surface of an Early Ceramic period camp site in Atchison County. This woodworking tool would have been manufactured by grinding or pecking it into a general shape followed by polishing. It would have been hafted onto a handle and required periodic resharpening.


Celt from 14DP318

Celt from 14DP318
Date: 1-1000 CE
This celt was found in an Early Ceramic period camp site in Doniphan County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1925. This woodworking tool would have been manufactured by grinding or pecking it into a general shape followed by polishing. It would have been hafted onto a handle and required periodic resharpening.


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