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3/4 Grooved Axe from 14WY308

3/4 Grooved Axe from 14WY308
Date: 1-1500 CE
This 3/4 grooved axe was collected from a multicomponent site in Wyandotte County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1973. While 3/4 grooved axes are frequently recovered from late Archaic sites, their use is not restricted to that time period. They get their name from the hafting groove that encircles 3/4 of the body of the axe. Axes like these are made by pecking a hard stone into a rough shape and then grinding and polishing it into its final state.


3/4 Grooved Axe from Geary County

3/4 Grooved Axe from Geary County
Date: Unknown
This 3/4 grooved axe was found in Geary County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1963. While 3/4 grooved axes are frequently recovered from late Archaic sites, their use is not restricted to that time period. Axes like these are made by pecking a hard stone into a rough shape and then grinding and polishing it into its final state. They get their name from the hafting groove the encircles 3/4 of its body.


3/4 Grooved Axe from the Plowboy Site, 14SH372

3/4 Grooved Axe from the Plowboy Site, 14SH372
Date: 2000 BCE-1850 CE
This 3/4 grooved axe was collected from the Plowboy site in Shawnee County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 2017. The Plowboy site was home to the Kansa, the Potawatomi, and Euro-Americans. At various times, the site contained a farm, a trading post, and a post office with nearby military trails, Mormon routes, a railroad and the California-Oregon trail. Before all of this activity, other American Indians also occupied the site and created this groundstone axe. Axes like these are made by pecking a hard stone into a rough shape and then grinding and polishing it into its final state. They get their name from the hafting groove the encircles 3/4 of its body.


AT & SF Railway demmitasse cup

AT & SF Railway demmitasse cup
Creator: C.E. Wheelock & Company
Date: between 1894 and 1925
This porcelain cup has an image of The Atchison Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad's head offices in Topeka, Kansas. They were headquartered in the building as depicted on this cup from 1884 to 1925. The cup was produced by C.E. Wheelock & Company based in Peoria, Illinois but produced in Berlin, Germany. The donor, Charles Goebel, was a Santa Fe employee for 46 years.


AT & SF Railway pitcher

AT & SF Railway pitcher
Creator: International Silver Company
Date: between 1890 and 1920
Silver-plated pitcher made by the International Silver Company for the Dining Car Service of the Atchison, Topeka, & Santa Fe Railway Company.


AT & SF Railway sledge

AT & SF Railway sledge
Creator: Warren Tool Corporation
Date: between 1890 and 1952
Double-faced sledge hammer with cast steel head and oak handle. Hammer was used in the repair of steam locomotives in the Santa Fe Shops at Topeka, Kansas. It also was used to deliver light blows in the dressing of hand tools.


AT & SF alligator wrench

AT & SF alligator wrench
Date: between 1935 and 1987
This is a steel Alligator Wrench so named for the serrations on one side of jaw resembling the open jaws of an alligator. It is used to turn cylindrical or irregularly shaped parts.


AT&SF rivet bumper

AT&SF rivet bumper
Date: between 1859 and 1987
This rivet bumper is associated with the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railway Company.


Adze from Blue Earth Village, 14PO24

Adze from Blue Earth Village, 14PO24
Date: 1790-1830 CE
This adze was used for cutting and shaping wood. It was collected from Blue Earth village and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1880. Blue Earth village was a Kansa Indian village in Pottawatomie County. Many lodge depressions were still visible on the surface in the 1880s.


Adze or Axe from the Curry Site, 14GR301

Adze or Axe from the Curry Site, 14GR301
Date: 1200-1400 CE
This chipped stone tool, possibly either an adze or an axe, was most likely used for woodworking. It was donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1984. The Curry site in Greenwood County was a multicomponent (multiple occupations) site occupied periodically during the Archaic, Early Ceramic and Middle Ceramic Periods.


Adze or Axe from the Wullscheleger Site, 14MH301

Adze or Axe from the Wullscheleger Site, 14MH301
Date: 1-1800 CE
This chipped stone tool, made of Florence chert that outcrops in the Flint Hills of Kansas and Oklahoma, may have been used as an adze or an axe used for wood working. It was collected from the Wullscheleger site in Marshall County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1961. The site was occupied periodically throughout the Early, Middle and Late Ceramic periods.


Adze or Axe from the Wullscheleger Site, 14MH301

Adze or Axe from the Wullscheleger Site, 14MH301
Date: 1-1800 CE
This chipped stone tool, made of Florence chert that outcrops in the Flint Hills of Kansas and Oklahoma, may have been used as an adze or axe. Artifacts like this one were likely used for wood working. It was collected from the Wullscheleger site in Marshall County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1961. The site was occupied periodically throughout the Early, Middle and Late Ceramic periods.


Agricultural implement models

Agricultural implement models
Date: Between 1939 and 1940
A photograph showing miniature models of agricultural implements made as part of the Work Progress Administration's Museum projects.


Angell Plow

Angell Plow
Creator: Angell, Charlie J.
Date: 1926
One-way disk plow manufactured by Charles Angell of Plains, Kansas. Angell, a wheat farmer, developed a plow that set all disks at the same angle, or "one-way," to increase tilling efficiency. Farmers liked that it plowed faster and easily broke up hard soil, but its overuse created a fine, dusty layer that quickly blew away in heavy winds. This is a smaller version of the actual plow, which was ten feet wide. Angell made this four-foot model for use in his family's vegetable garden.


Apple peeler

Apple peeler
Creator: Sinclair Scott Company
Date: between 1900 and 1940
Cast iron apple peeler by the Sinclair Scott Company of Baltimore. Hand crank. Clamp for mounting to countertop.


Army mess kit

Army mess kit
Date: 1944
United States Army mess kit. Used by Private First Class John Lee Meyer, Jr. Meyer, a native of Phillipsburg, Kansas, was drafted into the Army in 1943. He saw heavy combant in Germany as part of the 1st Infantry Division, 18th Regiment, Company F, eventually receiving both the Bronze Star and the Purple Heart. After the war, Meyer was reassigned to the 1st Division, Chief of Council, Presentation Department in Nuremberg. His new duties included building the architectural model for the redesigned courtroom at the Palace of Justice in preparation for the Nuremberg Trials.


Arrow Shaft Wrench from the Thompson Site, 14RC9

Arrow Shaft Wrench from the Thompson Site, 14RC9
Date: 1500-1800 CE
This bone arrow shaft wrench was recovered from the Thompson site in Rice County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1963. Arrow shaft wrenches were used to straighten a warped arrow shaft. This wrench was made on the left tibia of a deer. The site, listed in the National Register of Historic Places, was a Great Bend aspect village occupied by ancestral Wichita people.


Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Company's military train

Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Company's military train
Creator: Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railway Company
Date: between 1939 and 1945
This black and white photograph shows cooks preparing meals for soldiers on an Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Company's military train.


Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Company's military train

Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Company's military train
Creator: Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railway Company
Date: between 1939 and 1945
This black and white photograph shows soldiers cleaning their weapons while traveling on an Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Company's military train.


Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Company military train

Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Company military train
Creator: Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railway Company
Date: between 1939 and 1945
This black and white photograph shows troops being served food on a Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Company military train.


Awls from the El Cuartelejo Site, 14SC1

Awls from the El Cuartelejo Site, 14SC1
Date: 1650-1750 CE
Shown are three of the many bone awls that were recovered from the El Cuartelejo site in Scott County. The site, unique in Kansas, is the location of a seven room pueblo occupied by refugees from the Taos and Picuris pueblos in New Mexico in addition to Dismal River aspect groups (Apache). El Cuartelejo, also called the Scott County Pueblo, has been excavated and studied by many archeologists since 1898. These awls were recovered during the 1976 Kansas Archeology Training Program. Awls were usually made from deer bone and used as a perforating tool in soft material, like hides, and possibly in basket and pottery manufacturing. The awl on the left was made from a whitetail deer ulna and the awl in the center from a deer metapodial. The awl on the right was made from a rib, which, when the tip broke was never used again.


Ax

Ax
Date: between 1900 and 1904
Iron and oak felling ax marked along one side: "This axe used by Blanche Boies in smashing the glass cover to picture of Custer's Last Fight." Topeka resident Blanch Boies was a follower of the nationally recognized temperance advocate Carry Nation. Boies was known for violent acts directed at entities associated with the illegal consumption of alcohol. On January 9, 1904, Boise entered the Kansas State Historical Society rooms in the Kansas Statehouse and attacked a framed Anheuser-Busch advertisement depicting a print of Cassily Adam's famous painting, "Custer's Last Fight." Boies was arrested and incarcerated that night. Working in conjunction with Carry Nation, Boies later continued her temperance work by smashing the glass fronts of four Topeka saloons and two drugstores.


Axe Head from Fool Chief's Village, 14SH305

Axe Head from Fool Chief's Village, 14SH305
Date: 1830-1844 CE
This axe head was recovered from Fool Chief's Village, a Kansa village in Shawnee County that was the site of the 2012 Kansas Archeology Training Program, though excavations continued through 2012 and 2013. As this axe shows evidence of battering on the top, it may have been used as an anvil. The axe head was cleaned by electrolysis which passes an electrical current through a liquid solution to separate the rust from the artifact.


Axe Head from the Adair Cabin, 14MM327

Axe Head from the Adair Cabin, 14MM327
Date: 1855-1912
This axe head was recovered during excavations in 2014 of the Adair cabin site, home of Reverend Samuel and Florella Brown Adair and their family, in Osawatomie, Kansas. Osawatomie and the Adairs were much involved with the abolitionist movement during the "Bleeding Kansas" years. The Western or Wisconsin style axe head has a faint manufacturer's mark. It is 22.5 cm long with one bit end measuring 11.9 cm and the other 11.1 cm.


Axe Head from the Mine Creek Civil War Battlefield, 14LN337

Axe Head from the Mine Creek Civil War Battlefield, 14LN337
Date: 1864
This axe head was recovered during the 1990 survey and excavation at the Mine Creek Battlefield by Kansas Historical Society Archeologists and crew. There are many variations on axe heads styles, this one is similar to a cabin or New England axe. The butt end has been used as a hammer or an anvil. This axe was cleaned by electrolysis which passes an electrical current through a liquid solution to separate the rust from the artifact. The site was the location where on October 25, 1864 Union and Confederate forces fought one of the largest cavalry battles in the Civil War.


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