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Neumann Brothers Filling Station in Fredonia, Wilson County, Kansas Neumann Brothers Filling Station in Fredonia, Wilson County, Kansas

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314 Sanitary Train band at Camp Funston

314 Sanitary Train band at Camp Funston
Date: Between 1917 and 1919
This is a postcard showing the 314 Sanitary Train band at Camp Funston. The photograph was possibly taken during World War I.


60th Field Artillery Brigade at Camp Whiteside

60th Field Artillery Brigade at Camp Whiteside
Creator: Holt, O. W.
Date: November 9, 1926
This is a panoramic photograph showing the 60th Field Artillery Brigade at Camp Whiteside, Fort Riley, Kansas.


60th Field Artillery Brigade at Camp Whitside

60th Field Artillery Brigade at Camp Whitside
Date: November 27, 1928
This is a panoramic photograph showing the 60th Field Artillery Brigade at Camp Whitside, Fort Riley, Kansas.


Army maneuvers at Camp William Gary Sanger, Fort Riley, Kansas

Army maneuvers at Camp William Gary Sanger, Fort Riley, Kansas
Creator: Pennell, Joseph Judd, 1866-1922
Date: October 1903
This is a view of tents at Camp William Gary Sanger, Fort Riley, Kansas.


Camp Concordia, Cloud County, Kansas

Camp Concordia, Cloud County, Kansas
Date: Between 1943 and 1945
These five black and white photographs show Camp Concordia in Cloud County, Kansas. The facility was one of several camps built across Kansas during World War II to house German Prisoners of War.


Camp Doniphan from the southeast corner

Camp Doniphan from the southeast corner
Date: 1917
Panoramic view of Camp Doniphan from the southeast. The camp was located next to Fort Sill in Oklahoma.


Camp Funston, 14th National Army Cantonment, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, 14th National Army Cantonment, Fort Riley, Kansas
Creator: Williams, Verne O. & Stead, Chas A., K.C. Mo.
Date: 1917
This panoramic photograph shows a variety of structures at Camp Funston, which was established at Fort Riley, Kansas, after the outbreak of World War I and work began on the camp in the summer of 1917. The camp was named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston who grew up in Iola, Kansas, and who became well known for his role in the Philippines during the Spanish American War. The photograph was taken by Verne O. Williams and Charles A. Stead of Kansas City, Missouri. It is copyrighted 1917.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Date: Between 1917 and 1919
This black and white photograph shows the nurses' home at Camp Funston on the Ft. Riley military reservation near Junction City, Kansas. The facility named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp, were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Date: Between 1917 and 1919
This panoramic view shows Camp Funston on the Ft. Riley military reservation near Junction City, Kansas. The facility, named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp, were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Creator: Holt, O. W.
Date: Between 1917 and 1919
This panoramic photograph shows a variety of structures at Camp Funston, which was established at Fort Riley, Kansas, after the outbreak of World War I. Work began on the camp in the summer of 1917. The camp was named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston who grew up in Iola, Kansas, and who became well known for his role in the Philippines during the Spanish American War. The photograph was taken by O. W. Holt, Manhattan, Kansas.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Date: Between 1917 and 1919
This black and white photograph shows a mess hall at Camp Funston on the Ft. Riley military reservation near Junction City, Kansas. The facility, named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Creator: Baird Company Engravers
Date: Between 1917 and 1919
These two photographs show the mess hall and kitchen at Remount Station at Camp Funston on the Ft. Riley military reservation near Junction City, Kansas. The facility, named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Date: Between 1917 and 1919
These two interior views show the barracks at Camp Funston. The facility located on the Ft. Riley military reservation, named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The barracks were two-story wooden structures erected upon cement foundations with the capacity to house 200 to 250 men. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp, were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Date: Between 1917 and 1919
These five black and white photographs show construction at Camp Funston on the Ft. Riley military reservation near Junction City, Kansas. The facility, named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp, were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Creator: Pennell Photo
Date: 1917
This panoramic view shows Camp Funston on the Ft. Riley military reservation near Junction City, Kansas. The facility, named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Creator: Junction City Photo Company
Date: Between 1917 and 1919
This is a panoramic photo of the 14th National Army Cantonment, Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas. It shows a variety of structures. Camp Funston was established at Fort Riley, Kansas, after the outbreak of World War I and work began on the camp in the summer of 1917. The camp was named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston who grew up in Iola, Kansas, and who became well known for his role in the Philippines during the Spanish American War. The photograph was taken by the Junction City Photo Co., Junction City, Kansas.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Creator: Williams, Verne O. & Stead, Chas A., K.C. Mo.
Date: August 29, 1917
This panoramic view shows Camp Funston on the Ft. Riley military reservation near Junction City, Kansas. The facility, named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Creator: Williams, Verne O. & Stead, Chas A., K.C. Mo.
Date: September 19, 1917
This panoramic view shows Camp Funston on the Ft. Riley military reservation near Junction City, Kansas. The facility, named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp, were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Creator: Williams, Verne O. & Stead, Chas A., K.C. Mo.
Date: July 25, 1917
This panoramic view shows Camp Funston on the Ft. Riley military reservation near Junction City, Kansas. The facility, named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The number of buildings estimated to have been built as the camp were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley,  Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Creator: Holt, O.W.
Date: September 01, 1917
This panoramic view shows civilian workers awaiting their pay at Camp Funston. The facility located on the Ft. Riley military reservation, named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as approximately 15,000 carpenters built buildings in city block squares. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp, were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Date: April 12, 1918
This panoramic view shows Camp Funston and the soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division awaiting the return of their commander Major General Leonard J. Wood from France. The facility located on the Ft. Riley military reservation, named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp, were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Date: Between 1917 and 1919
This photograph shows a view of Camp Funston on the Ft. Riley military reservation near Junction City, Kansas. The facility, named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Date: Between 1917 and 1919
This photograph shows a view looking east on Infantry Boulevard from the west at Camp Funston on the Ft. Riley military reservation near Junction City, Kansas. The facility, named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp, were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Creator: Ballou, Don D.
Date: August 1917
This panoramic view shows Camp Funston on the Ft. Riley military reservation near Junction City, Kansas. The facility named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp, were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas
Date: Between 1917 and 1919
This panoramic view shows Camp Funston on the Ft. Riley military reservation near Junction City, Kansas. The facility named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.


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