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Act establishing commission for treaties with Osage Indians a creation of trail

Act establishing commission for treaties with Osage Indians a creation of trail
Date: March 3, 1825
This act was written establishing a commission to make treaties with the Osage Indians to create the Santa Fe Trail and treaties with the Osage tribes.


Brass Ring from the Canville Trading Post, 14NO396

Brass Ring from the Canville Trading Post, 14NO396
Date: 1847-1872
This brass ring was found at the Canville Trading Post in Neosho County near the Osage Reservation. It was donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1994. During the 1800s it would have been bright and shiny, but time has dulled its shine.


Butt End Plate from 14MY340

Butt End Plate from 14MY340
Date: 1785-1870
This butt end plate was recovered from a possible Osage camp site in Montgomery County. Little is known about this site. The brass end plate was used to protect the butt end of a gunstock.


Buttons from the Canville Trading Post, 14NO396

Buttons from the Canville Trading Post, 14NO396
Date: 1847-1872
An assortment of buttons were found at the Canville Trading Post site, 14NO396, in Neosho County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1994. They include both fancy and plain buttons made from glass, shell, bone, jet, and brass.


Buttons from the Wea Mission, 14MM322

Buttons from the Wea Mission, 14MM322
Date: 1837-1857
These buttons were recovered from the Wea Presbyterian Mission in 1997 by Kansas Historical Society archeologists and crew. The excavations revealed foundations for the Mission house, a spring house, and an outbuilding in addition to a filled in well. The Wea Mission (1834-1837) changed functions over time: the Osage River Subagency (1837-1844), the Wea and Piankeshaw Baptist Mission (1844-1857) and other occupants until 1909 when the house burned. The three buttons are all 4-hole sew through buttons, one each of metal, wood, and rubber.


C. M. Ricker to Charles Morris

C. M. Ricker to Charles Morris
Creator: Ricker, C. M.
Date: November 6, 1874
Captain C. R. Ricker of the Kansas State Militia, Medicine Lodge, Kansas, writes to Adjutant General Charles Morris of Topeka concerning a band of Pawnee Indians. Ricker notes that the Indians are just east of Medicine Lodge and believes they intend to fight a band of Osage Indians. Though this band had not disturbed any person or property, they were burning the prairie. Ricker suggests that the burning is an attempt by the Indians to further destroy settler's rangeland already devastated by drought and grasshoppers. Ricker asks for instructions on dealing with this "friendly" band of Pawnee. The threat of an Indian uprising on Kansas' southern boarder in 1873 led Governor Thomas Osborn to employ the state militia and appeal to President Ulysses S. Grant for federal troops and arms.


Captain Lewis Hanback's final report

Captain Lewis Hanback's final report
Creator: Hanback, Lewis
Date: 1875
This document is Captain Lewis Hanback's final report of an 1875 investigation into a conflict between Captain Ricker's company of state militia and a band of Osage Indians that occurred in 1874. The Osage Indians had filed a complaint with the Department of the Interior, claiming that the U. S. military had attacked a peaceful Indian encampment and stolen their horses and other property. Captain Lewis Hanback was ordered to take down testimonies and determine the circumstances surrounding the conflict. This final report summarizes these testimonies and includes a short history of Barbour County where the altercation took place.


Catholic Church at Osage Mission, St. Paul, Kansas

Catholic Church at Osage Mission, St. Paul, Kansas
Date: Between 1865 and 1875
A photograph of the Catholic Osage Mission established in Neosho County, Kansas. The center part of the building was erected in 1847.


Chief Bacon Rind, Chief of the Osage Indians

Chief Bacon Rind, Chief of the Osage Indians
Date: 1924
Studio portrait of Chief Bacon Rind, Chief of the Osage Indians.


Chief Bacon Rind, Chief of the Osage Indians

Chief Bacon Rind, Chief of the Osage Indians
Date: Between 1870 and 1890
Photo of Chief Bacon Rind, Chief of the Osage Indians


Chief Bacon Rind, Lizzie Ne-ho-Jah, and Forrest W. Chouteau

Chief Bacon Rind, Lizzie Ne-ho-Jah, and Forrest W. Chouteau
Date: 1926
A studio portrait of Chief Bacon Rind, Wah-she-hah, an Osage Indian, and Lizzie Ne-Ho-Jah, his second wife, a Kansa Indian; Forrest W. Chouteau, a Kansa Indian, and an unidentified man. A patron suggests the unidentified man (back right) may be Emitt E. Thompson, Kansa Chief, born 1902-1938. The photograph was possibly taken on their wedding day, May 13, 1926. They were married in Pawhuska, Oklahoma.


Chief Bacon Rind, former Chief of the Osage Indians

Chief Bacon Rind, former Chief of the Osage Indians
Date: Between 1870 and 1890
Magazine illustration of Chief Bacon Rind, former chief of the Osage Indians.


Conchos from the Canville Trading Post, 14NO396

Conchos from the Canville Trading Post, 14NO396
Date: 1847-1872
These three conchos were found at the Canville Trading Post in Neosho County near the Osage Reservation. They were donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1994. Conchos were used to decorate clothing, saddles and bridles. These conchos may be made of German silver, which is actually a copper alloy with nickel.


Cone Tinkler from the Wea Presbyterian Mission, 14MM322

Cone Tinkler from the Wea Presbyterian Mission, 14MM322
Date: 1837-1857
This cone tinkler was recovered from the Wea Presbyterian Mission in 1997 by Kansas Historical Society archeologists and crew. The excavations revealed foundations for the Mission house, a spring house, and an outbuilding in addition to a filled in well. The Wea Mission (1834-1837) changed functions over time: the Osage River Subagency (1837-1844), the Wea and Piankeshaw Baptist Mission (1844-1857) and other occupants until 1909 when the house burned. Tinklers were used to decorate hair, clothes and other objects.


Doll Fragments from the Canville Trading Post, 14NO396

Doll Fragments from the Canville Trading Post, 14NO396
Date: 1847-1872
Though the phrase "It cost and arm and a leg" was coined after Word War II, this doll paid the price much earlier that that time period. Shown are the right arm and hand and a midsection of a leg. These two doll fragments were recovered from the surface of the Canville Trading Post and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1994. The Canville Trading Post was located near the Osage Reservation in Neosho County.


E.A. Herod to George W. Martin

E.A. Herod to George W. Martin
Creator: Herod, E.A.
Date: October 02, 1902
In this letter, E.A. Herod, professor of mathematics at Northwestern Territorial Normal School, relates what he knows about a battle between Confederate soldiers and Osage Indians that took place in southeast Kansas during the Civil War.


Earring from the Canville Trading Post, 14NO396

Earring from the Canville Trading Post, 14NO396
Date: 1847-1872
This metal (possibly lead) earring was recovered from the Canville Trading Post and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1994. The earring is similar to a ball and cone type, which were a common trade item in the 19th century. There are two small holes near base of the earring. The Canville Trading Post was located near the Osage Reservation in Neosho County.


Eastman's map of Kansas and Nebraska territories showing the location of the Indian reserves according to the treaties of 1854

Eastman's map of Kansas and Nebraska territories showing the location of the Indian reserves according to the treaties of 1854
Date: Between 1854 and 1856
This map shows the locations of the new or reduced lands of Indian tribes according to the treaties of 1854. With the passage of the Kansas-Nebraska Act in 1854, the former Indian Territory was opened to white settlement, and the government looked for ways to relocate the native tribes who had made their homes in Kansas. To create more land for white settlement, George Manypenny, the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, negotiated treaties with Indian tribes that ceded much of the Indians' lands to the government. This land could then be sold to white emigrants. Naturally, these events helped to exacerbate existing tensions between settlers and Native Americans, contributing to the Indian Wars that occupied the U.S. Army during and after the American Civil War.


English Gunflint from the Wea Mission, 14MM322

English Gunflint from the Wea Mission, 14MM322
Date: 1837-1857
This gunflint was recovered from the Wea Presbyterian Mission in 1997 by Kansas Historical Society archeologists and crew. The gunflint, quarried and manufactured in southern England, and has a single dorsal arris. Gunflints were used to generate a spark in a flintlock musket or pistol and as strike-a-lights for lighting a fire. The excavations at the site revealed foundations for the Mission house, a spring house, and an outbuilding in addition to a filled in well. The Wea Mission (1834-1837) changed functions over time: the Osage River Subagency (1837-1844), the Wea and Piankeshaw Baptist Mission (1844-1857) and other occupants until 1909 when the house burned.


Eye Hoe from Montgomery County

Eye Hoe from Montgomery County
Date: Unknown
This eye hoe was found near Independence, in Montgomery County, on land that may have been owned at one time by Osage Indians. It was donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1891. According to the donor record the hoe was "found several feet down." The eye hoe gets its name from the collar or "eye" at the top of the blade, which is used as a handle attachment. Eye hoes are also called peasant hoes, ox eye hoes or scovil hoes. They are common throughout the world and represent one of the oldest styles of hoe.


Francis Frenchkiller and Wah-sis-tah-shin-kah

Francis Frenchkiller and Wah-sis-tah-shin-kah
Date: Between 1879 and 1918
A cabinet card photograph of Francis Frenchkiller and Wah-sis-tah-shin-kah in full dress. They were graduates from the Indian Training School in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. The donor information provided with this photograph identifies these boys as "Kansas" (Kansa) Indians. Research suggests they may actually be Osage. Frenchkiller's full name may be Francis Frenchkiller Claremore.


Frank Frantz to George W. Martin

Frank Frantz to George W. Martin
Creator: Frantz, Frank, 1872-1941
Date: November 30, 1904
In this item, United States Indian Agent Frank Frantz, who served as an officer with the Rough Riders during the Spanish-American War, responds to a letter sent by Kansas State Historical Society Secretary George W. Martin. While Frantz admits that he is new to the Osage Agency, he does provide important details on the Osages' current way of life. Frantz explains that the Governor of the tribe was a "fullblood" named O-lo-hah-wal-la who had been "raised to his position of prominence on account of his natural ability and education." Frantz also points out that a number of younger Osages were attending "Carlisle, Haskell, Chilocco and other nonreservation schools, including some of the best colleges and academies in this section of the country."


French Catholic Sacred Heart Medal from the Canville Trading Post, 14NO396

French Catholic Sacred Heart Medal from the Canville Trading Post, 14NO396
Date: 1847-1872
This French Catholic religious medal was found at the Canville Trading Post (14NO396) in Neosho County near the Osage Reservation. It was donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1994. One side reads: N. D. du Sacre Coeur Priez Pour Nous (Our Lady of the Sacred Heart pray for us). The other side reads: Joseph du Sacre Couer Priez Pour N. (Joseph of the Sacred Heart pray for us).


G. Stockmyer, Starving Kansas

G. Stockmyer, Starving Kansas
Creator: Stockmyer, G
Date: December, 1860
This broadside was prepared by G. Stockmyer, agent for Kansas Relief. It included descriptions of the conditions in most parts of Kansas Territory from individuals such as Thaddeus Hyatt, Allen Hodgson, and W. F. M. Arny and excerpts from various newspapers. Relief efforts were being coordinated by Samuel C. Pomeroy from Atchison, Kansas Territory. Freight and railroad companies provided free shipping for relief goods sent to K. T.


George Eugene Standing Bear

George Eugene Standing Bear
Date: Between 1895 and 1900
This is a photograph of George Eugene Standing Bear, the son of Mary Lookout and the grandson of Chief Fred Lookout. George's father was an Ogallala Sioux from Pine Ridge, and his father's mother Laura Whirlwind made the cradleboard like the Sioux baby boards. She wanted the baby to have Osage and Sioux baby boards.


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