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A.M. Campbell on the Battle of Washita

A.M. Campbell on the Battle of Washita
Creator: Campbell, A.M.
Date: October 10, 1905
In this item, A. M. Campbell relates his experiences regarding the Delawares, the Southern Cheyennes, Black Kettle, and the Battle of Washita. Serving as a ferry boat operator in Lawrence, Kansas Territory during the early 1850s, Campbell explains that he was "well acquainted" with Black Kettle and the members of his band. As the item indicates, Black Kettle was killed in 1868 during the Battle of the Washita in Oklahoma.


A. Roenigk to George W. Martin

A. Roenigk to George W. Martin
Creator: Roenigk, Adolph, 1847-1938
Date: January 14, 1908
This is a letter from Adolph Roenigk, Lincoln, Kansas, to George W. Martin, Kansas Historical Society, Topeka, Kansas. Roenigk inquires about a pipe that was once owned by Chief Tall Bull. Roenigk cites books and page numbers for this and other matters he's interested in researching.


Abstract of journals from the 1845 Kearny Expedition

Abstract of journals from the 1845 Kearny Expedition
Date: 1846
This excerpt from the congressional report of the Secretary of War includes the abstracts of two journals, one by Lieutenant William B. Franklin, a topographical engineer, and another by Lieutenant H.S. Turner of the 1st dragoons stationed at Fort Leavenworth. Under the command of Stephen Kearny, the 1st dragoons and their accompanying engineers left Fort Leavenworth on a military march, heading northwest on what would become the Oregon Trail, down along the Rocky Mountains to Mexican territory, and back up via the Santa Fe Trail. This march was intended as a display of the United States' military power to both native tribes and the British government (which at this time was exerting its authority over Oregon Territory). For the most part this abstract details their route, but it does include a transcription of a conversation between Kearny and a Sioux chief named Bull Tail.


Affidavit of John Smith

Affidavit of John Smith
Creator: United States. Congress. Senate
Date: January 15, 1865
This affidavit given by John Smith, an interpreter for the United States military, was presented to the military commission investigating the massacre of Cheyenne Indians at Sand Creek, Colorado, in 1864. Smith's account focuses primary on the events prior to the massacre, including the attitudes of the Cheyenne leaders One Eye and Black Kettle. The affidavit is part of a larger report containing evidence obtained at this hearing, titled Report of the Secretary of War, Communicating, In compliance with a resolution of the Senate of February 4, 1867, a copy of the evidence taken at Denver and Fort Lyon, Colorado Territory, by a military commission, ordered to inquire into the Sand Creek massacre, November, 1864.


Albert Henning to George W. Martin

Albert Henning to George W. Martin
Creator: Henning, Albert
Date: August 16, 1905
In this letter to George W. Martin of the Kansas State Historical Society, Albert Henning describes finding "the body of an indian with a number of bullet holes in his body." According to Henning, the Indian that he found was killed by a party of men from Oberlin who had gathered together in the aftermath of a March 1879 attack by the Northern Cheyenne under Dull Knife.


Alex E. Case collection

Alex E. Case collection
Date: 1866 - 1917
In this small collection, Alex E. Case, a state representative from Marion, Kansas, describes his experiences in Kansas in the 1860s. He recounts a conversation with an Irish immigrant named Sallie Young, who told Case about her encounter with Quantrill's raiders as they rode towards Lawrence. Case also relates his memories of the Cheyenne Indian raids on Marion in 1868 and shares stories about his neighbors A. A. Moore and William Henry Roberts. A searchable transcription is available by clicking "Text Version" below. Funds for digitization provided by Mr. Steve Peckel in memory of William Chalfant.


An Appeal from Arickaree

An Appeal from Arickaree
Creator: Howes, Cecil, 1880-1950
Date: 1940-1950
This item, written by Kansas City Star editor Charles Cecil Howes, concerns the Battle of Arickaree that took place in Kansas in 1868. Howes does not address any of the controversy surrounding the event but he does provide a solid account of the accepted facts of the combat that took place between U.S. Army soldiers, led by General George A. Forsyth (a Colonel at the time), and Indian warriors led by Cheyenne War Chief Roman Nose. This item also includes some excerpts from General Forsyth's "Thrilling Days of Army Life," which had not yet been published at the time Howes' article was printed.


Arickaree history collection

Arickaree history collection
Date: [Not given]
This collection contains originals and copies of correspondences, articles, notes and related materials regarding the Battle of Beechers Island, also known as the Battle of Arickaree Fork, on September 19, 1868.


Big Bear and wife

Big Bear and wife
Date: 1910
This is a postcard photograph of Cheyenne, Big Bear and his wife. Funds for digitization provided by Mr. Steve Peckel in memory of William Chalfant.


Big Horse and family

Big Horse and family
Date: Between 1867and 1870
This photograph shows Cheyenne Indian Big Horse, his wife, and small child. Funds for digitization provided by Mr. Steve Peckel in memory of William Chalfant.


Black Kettle's daughter, Cheyenne, in Indian Territory

Black Kettle's daughter, Cheyenne, in Indian Territory
Creator: Bliss, W. P.
Date: Between 1875 and 1877
This cabinet card made by William P. Bliss in the 1870s identifies the subject as the daughter of Black Kettle, the Cheyenne chief who was killed in the Battle of the Washita in 1868. Bliss was a photographer in the 1860s, 1870s and perhaps 1880s who is known to have worked in Kansas, Indian Territory, and New Mexico. Following his discharge from the Army, Bliss opened a photographic business in Topeka in 1864 or 1865. By 1870, he had moved his family to the Wichita area, where he both farmed and worked as a photographer. From there, he went to Indian Territory, first to the Cheyenne Agency at Darlington in late 1874 or early 1875, and soon thereafter to Fort Sill. By 1878 or 1879 Bliss had moved to Santa Fe, New Mexico. This cabinet card was an early donation to the Historical Society. Its accession date of March 29, 1878, means the photograph was likely made in the 1874-1877 period. The cabinet card carries no photographer's imprint, but the accession information attributes it to Bliss.


Bradford Robbins Grimes and Captain "Dick" Grimes, grandfather

Bradford Robbins Grimes and Captain "Dick" Grimes, grandfather
Creator: Grimes, Daisy Ferguson
Date: Unknown
This is a history of Bradford Robbins Grimes and his grandfather, Captain "Dick" Grimes. The history covers cattle and cattle drives and the Indian presence that both men encountered.


Burning the Cheyenne village near Fort Larned, Kansas

Burning the Cheyenne village near Fort Larned, Kansas
Creator: Davis, Theodore R.
Date: April 19, 1867
This illustration portrays soldiers under the command of General Winfield S. Hancock burning a Cheyenne village on Pawnee Fork, thirty miles west of Fort Larned. The illustration was drawn by Theodore Davis and published in Harpers Weekly, April 19, 1867.


Bushy Head, Cheyenne Indian

Bushy Head, Cheyenne Indian
Date: 1870-1890
This is a photograph of a Cheyenne Indian named Bushy Head. Funds for digitization provided by Mr. Steve Peckel in memory of William Chalfant.


Buttons from the Village on Pawnee Fork, 14NS403

Buttons from the Village on Pawnee Fork, 14NS403
Date: 1867
These two buttons were recovered from the Village on the Pawnee Fork (also called Hancock's Village) in Ness County during excavations in 1977. It was there, in 1867, that a village of several hundred Southern Cheyenne and Southern Teton Oglala was destroyed by order of Major General Winifred S. Hancock. The site is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. "Bullet" buttons, such as these, are generally considered for military use. They predate the 1867 destruction of the village and may have, by that time, been used by civilians. They all have a steel wire shank for attachment.


Captain Lewis Hanback's final report

Captain Lewis Hanback's final report
Creator: Hanback, Lewis
Date: 1875
This document is Captain Lewis Hanback's final report of an 1875 investigation into a conflict between Captain Ricker's company of state militia and a band of Osage Indians that occurred in 1874. The Osage Indians had filed a complaint with the Department of the Interior, claiming that the U. S. military had attacked a peaceful Indian encampment and stolen their horses and other property. Captain Lewis Hanback was ordered to take down testimonies and determine the circumstances surrounding the conflict. This final report summarizes these testimonies and includes a short history of Barbour County where the altercation took place.


Captured Cheyenne chiefs

Captured Cheyenne chiefs
Date: Unknown
This is an illustration of captured Cheyenne chiefs identified as (left to right) Fat Bear, Dull Knife, and Big Head. These men were held by Custer as hostages in exchange for the return of white prisoners. This drawing was copied from Following the Guidon. Funds for digitization provided by Mr. Steve Peckel in memory of William Chalfant.


Captured Northern Cheyenne Indians

Captured Northern Cheyenne Indians
Date: 1879
This is a group photo of Dull Knife's band of captured Northern Cheyenne, Dodge City, Kansas.


Carl "Ado" Hunnius diary

Carl "Ado" Hunnius diary
Creator: Hunnius, Ado, 1842-1923
Date: January 10 - 24, 1876
Carl J. A. "Ado" Hunnius kept this diary while visiting the Cheyenne and Arapaho tribes in Indian Territory. The diary contains detailed information about the trip and sketches (drawn illustrations) of some of the things he saw during the course of his travels. A complete transcription is available by clicking on Text Version below.


Charles R. Green to George W. Martin

Charles R. Green to George W. Martin
Creator: Green, Charles R.
Date: June 20, 1910
In this letter to George W. Martin, Charles R. Green addresses information related to the Sac and Fox tribe. Green, proprietor of Green's Library and Museum in Olathe, Kansas, explains that he interviewed a missionary named Samuel Black, who once served as a missionary for the Sac and Fox. Green explains that Black assisted in recruiting African American men to fight in Company K, 1st U.S. Colored Troops.


Cheyenne Agency, Indian Territory

Cheyenne Agency, Indian Territory
Creator: Hunnius, Ado, 1842-1923
Date: January 16, 1876
This pencil sketch of the New Post of Cheyenne Agency, Indian Territory, is taken from the Ado Hunnius diary and depicts the post from "east of square." The drawing shows the post trader, C. S. store house, Adj. office, Q.M.[x]. House, and stables.


Cheyenne Chief Bull Bear

Cheyenne Chief Bull Bear
Date: 1883
This is a photograph of a drawing of Chief Bull Bear of the Cheyenne. This image is taken from "Wild Life on the Plains" written by George Armstrong Custer. Funds for digitization provided by Mr. Steve Peckel in memory of William Chalfant.


Cheyenne Indian drawing

Cheyenne Indian drawing
Creator: Northern Cheyenne
Date: Between 1870 and 1880
This is a colored pencil drawing created by a Cheyenne Indian, possibly Wild Hog. The drawings may be related to the 1878 escape of a band of Northern Cheyenne from Indian Territory and their attempt to return to their homeland north of Kansas. The incident is commonly known as the Dull Knife raid and is regarded as the last major conflict between whites and Indians in Kansas.


Cheyenne Indian drawing

Cheyenne Indian drawing
Creator: Northern Cheyenne
Date: Between 1870 and 1880
This is a colored pencil drawing created by a Cheyenne Indian, possibly Wild Hog. The item is a single sheet of paper with drawings on both sides. The tipi drawing appears on one side, the horse on the other. The drawings may be related to the 1878 escape of a band of Northern Cheyenne from Indian Territory and their attempt to return to their homeland north of Kansas. Six Cheyenne were confined to jail in Dodge City and charged with murder in 1879. The incident is commonly known as the Dull Knife raid and is regarded as the last major conflict between whites and Indians in Kansas.


Cheyenne Indian lodges

Cheyenne Indian lodges
Date: Between 1870 and 1879
This is a photo of several Cheyenne Indians sitting in front of their lodges near Anadarko, Indian Territory. The original photo is at the National Archives.


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