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1855 map of Richardson (Wabaunsee) County, Kansas

1855 map of Richardson (Wabaunsee) County, Kansas
Date: 1855
This map shows the original Wabaunsee (Richardson) County boundaries which existed prior to a realignment of the borders with Morris County in 1870 and Riley County in 1871. Approximately 72 square miles were removed in the first action and 54 square miles in the latter. Notice the Potawatomi Reservation in the upper right section of the county and the Kaw Reserve in the lower left portion.


A.M. Coville to George W. Martin

A.M. Coville to George W. Martin
Creator: Coville, A.M.
Date: March 27, 1909
In this letter to Kansas State Historical Society Secretary Geroge W. Martin, A.M. Coville relates his knowledge of the Kaw Indian White Plume. Coville explains that when he first met White Plume in 1875 he "claimed to be over 90 years old, and he certainly looked to be 100. His hair was white his face wrinkled and features shrunken." Coville also mentions that White Plume had survived an attack with the "Plains Indians" in which he had been scalped, surviving only by being rescued by his tribesmen.


A New Home in an Old Settlement:  Come  and see the "New Land in an Old Country"

A New Home in an Old Settlement: Come and see the "New Land in an Old Country"
Date: May 1, 1876
This paper advertises for sale land, formerly owned by the Pottawatomie Nation, from 1837 to 1868, and then purchased by the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Rail Road Company. On the reverse side of the paper is a sectional map showing the area and identifying those lands that were still for sale by the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Company. The text gives brief descriptions of the cities and towns in the area; the railroads available; fuel and lumber that are native to the area; and, descriptions and prices of the land.


Abraham Burnett

Abraham Burnett
Date: Between 1850 and 1870
A portrait of Chief Abraham Burnett, 1812-1870, of the Pottawatomie Nation. Also known by his birth name, Nan-Wesh-Mah, and as Abram B. Burnett, in 1838 he and other Pottawatomies were removed from their homes in Indiana to the Mission Band Pottawatomie reservation in southeast Kansas Territory. In 1848, Burnett established a large farm in what was to become known as the Burnett Mound area along Shunganunga Creek in Topeka, Kansas, where he and his family farmed and traded horses until his death in 1870.


Abraham Burnett and John Peyton

Abraham Burnett and John Peyton
Date: 1860s or 1870s
Portrait of Pottawatomie chief Abraham Burnett with, possibly, John Peyton standing by his side.


A brief sketch of Indian tribes in Franklin County, Kansas in 1862-1906

A brief sketch of Indian tribes in Franklin County, Kansas in 1862-1906
Creator: Romig, Joseph
Date: 1906
This item, written by missionary Reverend Joseph Romig of Franklin County, Kansas, contains a detailed history of the Native American tribes of Franklin County, Kansas, from 1862-1906. The cover indicates it is "for the benefit of the future generation of the county."


Abstract of articles purchased during the 4th quarter, 1878

Abstract of articles purchased during the 4th quarter, 1878
Creator: Potawatomi Indian Agency
Date: October 01, 1878-December 14, 1878
This item details the goods and services purchased for the Kansas Agency in the final quarter of 1878. This abstract lists who purchased the item, what item was purchased, as well as the price of the item. Items purchased include buttons, coffee, nails, rice, scissors, and many other items needed for the Kickapoo tribe that lived on the Kansas Agency. During this period, the Kansas Agency was officially known as the Potawatomi Agency but was often referred to as the Kansas Agency because it was the only one in Kansas at the time.


A child on horseback

A child on horseback
This is a photograph of an undentified Pottawatomie Indian child on horseback.


Adolph Roenigk and George W. Martin correspondence

Adolph Roenigk and George W. Martin correspondence
Creator: Roenigk, Adolph, 1847-1938
Date: October 10, 1904-January 24, 1908
In this correspondence with George W. Martin of the Kansas State Historical Society, Adolph Roenigk addresses issues related to the Pawnee Indians. In the letter dated October 10, 1904, Roenigk explains that "a Battle between the Potowatomie and the Pawnee Indians was fought here [Lincoln, Kansas] in 1863." According to Roenigk, between 14 and 16 Native Indians were killed during the fighting. Similarly, Roenigk's letter of October 24, 1906, concerns violence between Kansans and Native Indians during the late 1860s when a man named Solomon Humbarger and Solomon's brother were attacked by Native Indians. After killing one of their chiefs Roenigk states that Humbarger was shot in the thigh with an arrow.


Albert G. Boone to Thomas Nesbit Stinson

Albert G. Boone to Thomas Nesbit Stinson
Creator: Boone, Albert G.
Date: January 16, 1860
Albert G. Boone, writing from Westport, Missouri, to Thomas N. Stinson, described his unsuccessful efforts to sell a printing press for Stinson. Boone suggested that Stinson contact "Free Statemen" with whom he was on good terms to see if they could help him sell it. Boone added a postscript to the letter asking about the prospects of a treaty with the Pottawatomie.


A new home in an old settlement

A new home in an old settlement
Date: May 1, 1876
This paper advertises for sale land formerly owned by the Pottawatomie Nation from 1837 to 1868, and then owned by the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Rail Road Company. On the reverse side of the paper is a sectional map showing the area and identifying those lands that were still for sale by the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad company. The text gives brief descriptions of the cities and towns in the area; the railroads available; fuel and lumber that are native to the area; descriptions and prices of the lands.


Anna and Rebecca Hale

Anna and Rebecca Hale
Date: Between 1960 and 1969
A photograph showing Anna Hale, a New Mexico Indian school teacher, and Rebecca Hale, members of the Potawatomi tribe.


Beadwork from the Lueck Collection Donation

Beadwork from the Lueck Collection Donation
Date: 1893-1897
These two beadwork pieces were donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 2002. The striking green and white beaded floral motif were sewn onto what is now scraps of red felt. The donor was the daughter-in-law of Henry Lueck, who was a partner in the Johnson and Lueck Store in Netawaka, Kansas, at the turn of the century. Some of the items in the collection may have been taken in trade by Mr. Lueck, but most were purchased from his Potawatomi customers.


Beadwork from the Lueck Donation

Beadwork from the Lueck Donation
Date: 1893-1897
These two beadwork pieces, possibly arm or leg bands for dance regalia, were donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 2002. The geometric pattern measures 12 3/8" long. The red yarn and black thread tassels range from 1/2" to 3" long. The donor was the daughter-in-law of Henry Lueck, who was a partner in the Johnson and Lueck Store in Netawaka, Kansas, at the turn of the century. Some of the items in the collection may have been taken in trade by Mr. Lueck, but most were purchased from his Potawatomi customers.


Benjamin S. Paulen and Charles Curtis, Pawnee, Kansas

Benjamin S. Paulen and Charles Curtis, Pawnee, Kansas
Creator: Holt, O.W.
Date: August 1, 1928
This sepia colored photograph shows Kansas Governor Benjamin S. Paulen shaking hands with members from the Osawatomie tribe at the dedication ceremony for the restoration of the state's first territorial capitol in Pawnee, Kansas. Standing in the middle watching the handshake is United States Senator from Kansas, Charles Curtis.


Bison, Central Plains

Bison, Central Plains
Creator: Shipshee, Louis
Date: between 1916 and 1975
Oil painting of bison by Louis ShipShee, a Potawatomi Indian chief and artist. ShipShee was born August 11, 1896, on the Potawatomi Reservation near Mayetta, Jackson County, Kansas. He was a self-taught artist, know throughout the United States and Europe. He was an instructor at Haskell Indian College from 1932 to 1938, and lived in Topeka from 1952 until his death on June 17, 1975. Provenance of the painting suggests that it was given to Alf Landon by the artist.


Buttons from the Plowboy Site, 14SH372

Buttons from the Plowboy Site, 14SH372
Date: 1840-1950
These six buttons were collected from the Plowboy site in Shawnee County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 2017. The Plowboy site was home to the Kansa, the Potawatomi, and Euro-Americans. At various times, the site contained a farm, a trading post, and a post office with nearby military trails, Mormon routes, a railroad and the California-Oregon trail. Shown on the top row are a black plastic four hole coat button, a shell two hole coat button, and a faceted pink glass button with a loop back. Those on the bottom row include two shell two hole buttons, one of a fish-eye style and the other decorated with incised squares and cross hatching. The final artifact is a metal button front with the profile of a Greek or Roman lady.


Buttons from the Plowboy Site, 14SH372

Buttons from the Plowboy Site, 14SH372
Date: 1840-1950
These five buttons were collected from the Plowboy site in Shawnee County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 2017. The Plowboy site was home to the Kansa, the Potawatomi, and Euro-Americans. At various times, the site contained a farm, a trading post, and a post office with nearby military trails, Mormon routes, a railroad and the California-Oregon trail. Shown are a calico button with a brass rim, a black two-hole Fish Eye button, a large and a small shell two-hole button, and a blue plastic four-hole sew through button.


Chief Abram B. Burnett

Chief Abram B. Burnett
Creator: Knight, J. Lee
Date: 1869
This is a photograph of Pottawatomie Chief Abram B. Burnett in 1869. He weighed 450 pounds at the time this photograph was taken, and he died a year later in March, 1870.


Chief Abram B. Burnett

Chief Abram B. Burnett
Creator: Knight, J. Lee
Date: 1869
This is a photograph of Pottawatomie Chief (Nan-Wesh-Mah) Abram Burnett. In 1838, Burnett and his Pottawatomi bride, Dah-Moosh-Ke-Keaw, were removed with other Mission Band Pottawatomi to a reservation in southeast Kansas. His first wife died in 1842 and in 1843, he remarried Marie Kofflock, a German Catholic immigrant. In 1848 Chief Burnett moved to the area that was later to become Topeka. In Topeka, he farmed a large plot of land near Burnett's Mound along Shunganunga Creek and traded horses. He was a physically large and powerful man, reportedly weighing more than 450 pounds in his later years. He dressed in a coat and trousers and wore a tie when occasions demanded. He often wore a hat and carried an elaborate cane with a handle of rose quartz with a silver collar and an ebonised hardwood shaft, as shown in this photograph. Chief Burnett died June 14, 1870 on his farm near Topeka and his wife and children moved to the Pottawatomi reservation in Oklahoma.


Chief Kack Kack

Chief Kack Kack
Date: 1880s or 1890s
This is a studio portrait of Kack-Kack, Pottawatomie chief, seated in a chair.


Chief Wiskigeamatyuk

Chief Wiskigeamatyuk
Date: 1918
This is a photograph showing Chief Wiskigeamatyuk, a member of the Potawatomi tribe and the grandson of Prairie Chief Senachwine. The photograph was taken in the Michigan Mountains. The Potawatomie were once located in the Great Lakes region before they were moved to Kansas Territory. On September 26, 1833, the Potawatomi of Illinois and Wisconsin signed the Treaty of Chicago, which ceded the last of their lands to the United States. The United States began removing the Potawatomi from their Wisconsin lands between 1835 and 1838. Most Wisconsin Potawatomi went to Iowa and later to Kansas and settled on reservations. Despite this, many stayed in Wisconsin. About 200 of the Potawatomi who went to Iowa and Kansas returned to Wisconsin and settled in the vicinity of Wisconsin Rapids. The Wisconsin Potawatomi are federally recognized, but they are included on the tribal roll of the Kansas Potawatomi.


Chief Wiskigeamatyuk, Edith Roosevelt, Ethel Roosevelt, Agnes Martin and Chief Kootoose

Chief Wiskigeamatyuk, Edith Roosevelt, Ethel Roosevelt, Agnes Martin and Chief Kootoose
Date: Between 1901 and 1909
This is a photograph showing Chief Wiskigeamatyuk, a member of Potawatomi tribe; Edith Roosevelt; Ethel Roosevelt; Agnes Martin; and Chief Kootoose, member of the Potawatomi tribe. The photograph was taken in the Wisconsin woods. The Potawatomi were once located in the Great Lakes region before they were moved to Kansas Territory. On September 26, 1833, the Potawatomi of Illinois and Wisconsin signed the Treaty of Chicago, which ceded the last of their lands to the United States. The United States began removing the Potawatomi off of their Wisconsin lands between 1835 and 1838. Most Wisconsin Potawatomi went to Iowa and later to Kansas and settled on reservations. Despite this, many stayed in Wisconsin. About 200 of the Potawatomi who went to Iowa and Kansas returned to Wisconsin and settled in the vicinity of Wisconsin Rapids. The Wisconsin Potawatomi are federally recognized, but they are included on the tribal roll of the Kansas Potawatomi.


Colonel A.C. Pepper to Robert Simerwell

Colonel A.C. Pepper to Robert Simerwell
Creator: Pepper, Abel C., 1793-1860
Date: April 11, 1833
In this letter to Robert Simerwell, Indian Agent Colonel A.C. Pepper tells Simerwell that he is preparing to lead a band of Native Indians led by Quea-Quea-Tah, west in the early part of June 1833, and that the Native Indians "express a wish" that Simerwell accompany them on their journey. Pepper also states that Simerwell should talk with the Native Indians in his area to see if they are interested in moving west with the others and, if so, to meet at Logansport, Indiana on June 10, 1833.


Conception of heaven: Pottawatomie Indians

Conception of heaven: Pottawatomie Indians
Date: Unknown
This art work shows the Pottawatomie (Potawatomi) Indian conception of heaven.


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