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Abstract of articles purchased during the third quarter of 1879

Abstract of articles purchased during the third quarter of 1879
Creator: Linn, H.C.
Date: July 01, 1879-September 01, 1879
This item contains a list of items purchased by U.S. Indian Agent H.C. Linn for the Kansas (Potawatomi) Agency in the third quarter of 1879. Items include beef, bastard files, bacon, lye, nails, and other things. The abstract indicates that the purchases were for the Kickapoo tribe living at the Kansas Agency.


Bark house, Kickapoo Reservation

Bark house, Kickapoo Reservation
Creator: Parkman, Mary
Date: 1935
This photograph, taken in 1935 as part of the New Deal Federal Indian program, depicts a bark house on the Kickapoo Reservation in northeast Kansas. This was the home of Marie Pewamo, who is presumably the woman standing out front. This style of house had been used since the nineteenth century by both the Kickapoo and Pottawatomi tribes.


Boy in regalia

Boy in regalia
Date: 1995
A Kickapoo boy dances in his regalia, which is based on traditions from the elders and also adds a contemporary take in the beaded Mickey Mouse patch on his sleeve. He learned beading from his grandmother, who had learned from her mother. His grandmother served as head woman dancer in pow wows.


Buttons from 14LV334

Buttons from 14LV334
Date: 1830-1900
These four buttons were collected from a multicomponent site overlooking the Missouri River in Leavenworth County. The site, with occupations in the Middle Ceramic and Historic periods, may have once been a Kickapoo habitation site in addition to later habitations. The buttons include a ladies dress button made of jet with a linear design and a loop or shank back; a metal four-hole sew through button, likely for pants; a white china four-hole dish button; and a wooden recessed four-hole sew through button.


C.C. Isley to Reverend W.C. McGuire, and accompanying manuscript

C.C. Isley to Reverend W.C. McGuire, and accompanying manuscript
Creator: Isely, Charles C.
Date: September 06, 1943
These two items, from C.C. Isely of Dodge City, Kansas, contain Isely's thoughts on his experience at the Kickapoo Indian Reservation in the late 1890s. In the letter to Reverend W.C. McGuire of Hoyt, Kansas, Isely asks McGuire if he was familiar with two Potawatomies that Isely appeared with in a picture taken at the time of his 1897 visit. The accompanying story, titled "Democracy in the Primitive" contains Isely's recollections of his visit to the Kickapoo Indian Reservation near Powhattan, Kansas.


Charles R. Green to George W. Martin

Charles R. Green to George W. Martin
Creator: Green, Charles R.
Date: June 20, 1910
In this letter to George W. Martin, Charles R. Green addresses information related to the Sac and Fox tribe. Green, proprietor of Green's Library and Museum in Olathe, Kansas, explains that he interviewed a missionary named Samuel Black, who once served as a missionary for the Sac and Fox. Green explains that Black assisted in recruiting African American men to fight in Company K, 1st U.S. Colored Troops.


Coronado's route to Quivira, 1541

Coronado's route to Quivira, 1541
Creator: Ritchey, William E
Date: 1903
This map of Kansas Territory in 1856 shows Coronado's route to and from Quivira in 1541. The Santa Fe Trail is annotated in red. On the reverse is a newspaper article with a map drawn by George Allen Root showing Coronado's route to Quivira and giving distances between points. There is a note from W[illiam] E Ritchey, Harveyville, Kansas, July 9, 1903, to A. R. Greene, Special Inspector, Department of the Interior requesting that Greene mention Ritchey's work in an article that will be published by the Kansas Historical Society. The location of a number of Indian reservations are shown on the map.


Council at Medicine Lodge Creek

Council at Medicine Lodge Creek
Creator: Howland, J.
Date: November 16, 1867
This drawing by J. Howland, originally printed in Harper's Weekly, depicts the council between representatives of the U.S. government and the Kiowa and Comanche tribes at Medicine Creek Lodge, Kansas, in 1867. At this council the Kiowa, Comanche, Plains Apache, Cheyenne and Arapaho tribes signed three successive treaties with the United States government, collectively known as the Medicine Lodge treaty.


Council meeting at Kickapoo Agency

Council meeting at Kickapoo Agency
Creator: Baldwin, Royal
Date: 1857
This is a transcribed copy of a conversation between Keotuck and his fellow Potawatomi leaders and their Indian agent, Royal Baldwin. The Potawatomi and Kickapoo had been living on the same lands, and since they had just planted their crops, the Potawatomi were expressing their desire to remain settled on this land. Apparently the United States government had not given the Potawatomi their full annuity payment and had asked them to move, but Keotuck's band protested because they had paid 8,009 dollars to remain with the Kickapoo. The back of the document includes a transcription of the compact joining the Kickapoo and Potawatomi, written in 1851.


Daniel Read Anthony, Sr. to sister

Daniel Read Anthony, Sr. to sister
Creator: Anthony, D. R. (Daniel Read), 1824-1904
Date: August 07, 1857
The following is a letter from Daniel Read Anthony, Sr. to his sister describing his recent land acquisitions and providing a sketch drawing of her claim (at the edge of the Kickapoo Tribe reservation) that he has prepared for her once she arrives in the territory. American Indian lands were in high demand as white settlers poured into the territory. It is not clear if the "sister" to whom the letter is addressed is Susan B. Anthony but there are references to a claim for Susan and the map (last page) shows her cabin.


Die Indianer der Vereinigten Staaten

Die Indianer der Vereinigten Staaten
Creator: Hunnius, Ado, 1842-1923
Date: 1870-1900
This item contains an article on the Indians of the United States written by Carl Julius Adolph Hunnius. Known as Ado to his friends and colleagues, Hunnius was a Civil War veteran, Indian Wars veteran, artist, writer, and long time resident of Kansas. The article, printed entirely in German, contains information compiled by Hunnius on the Native American tribes in the United States. Details include the branch of the tribe (Stamm), place of residence (Wohnsitz), county, and the total number of men, women and children (Manner, Weiber, und Kinder) for each tribe. The information provided in the article was taken from the offical reports of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs. The article also mentions that there were a total of 100,000 civilized Indians, 135,000 half-civilized Indians, and 81,000 "Wild" Indians.


Eastman's map of Kansas and Nebraska territories showing the location of the Indian reserves according to the treaties of 1854

Eastman's map of Kansas and Nebraska territories showing the location of the Indian reserves according to the treaties of 1854
Date: Between 1854 and 1856
This map shows the locations of the new or reduced lands of Indian tribes according to the treaties of 1854. With the passage of the Kansas-Nebraska Act in 1854, the former Indian Territory was opened to white settlement, and the government looked for ways to relocate the native tribes who had made their homes in Kansas. To create more land for white settlement, George Manypenny, the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, negotiated treaties with Indian tribes that ceded much of the Indians' lands to the government. This land could then be sold to white emigrants. Naturally, these events helped to exacerbate existing tensions between settlers and Native Americans, contributing to the Indian Wars that occupied the U.S. Army during and after the American Civil War.


Ezra A. Hayt to H.C. Linn

Ezra A. Hayt to H.C. Linn
Creator: Hayt, Ezra A.
Date: December 10, 1878
In this item, U.S. Commissioner of Indian Affairs explains to U.S. Indian Agent H.C. Linn that the U.S. Secretary of the Interior has approved the purchase of school and shop supplies on the "open market."


Franklin George Adams'  Residence, Topeka, Kansas

Franklin George Adams' Residence, Topeka, Kansas
Date: May 1891
A sepia colored photo of Franklin George Adams' residence on the S.W. corner of Fifteenth and Mulvane streets in Topeka, Kansas. F. G. Adams, one of Kansas' most prominent settlers, was a free-stater and member of the Leavenworth Constitutional Convention of 1858. In 1862, he drafted the law providing for the organization of the state's agriculture society and served for three years as the society's secretary. In addition to his appointment as agriculture secretary, Adams was Clerk of the United States District Court from 1863 to 1864. Following this position, Adams was appointed United States Indian Agent to the Kickappos from 1865 to 1869. Adams' greatest and lasting contribution as a public servant was his appointment, in 1875, as secretary of the Kansas Historical Society. During his tenure as secretary, Adams dedicated his time and effort to build the society's collection of original documents for future generations to study and interpret the state's history.


G.T. Bolman receipt

G.T. Bolman receipt
Creator: Bolman, G.T.
Date: November 1, 1878
This receipt lists items purchased from G.T. Bolman's store in Netawaka, Kansas, by U.S. Indian Agent H.C. Linn for the Potawatomi Agency in Kansas.


H.E. Bruce to Charles Cecil Howes

H.E. Bruce to Charles Cecil Howes
Creator: Bruce, H.E.
Date: May 18, 1939
These are several items from H.E. Bruce that were sent to Charles Cecil Howes. The first item is a letter from Bruce to Howes that concerns the meeting Bruce was having with the Potawatomies on May 21, 1939. Bruce, U.S. Indian Agent for the Potawatomie, attached a copy of the 43-page speech that he was going to give, as well as a sample ballot that was going to be used "in voting on certain questions." In the end, Bruce explained to Howes that "agitators have stirred up a very unwholesome situation, which I think this meeting will largely overcome."


H.L. Stein to George W. Martin

H.L. Stein to George W. Martin
Creator: Stein, H.L.
Date: May 12, 1902
In this letter to George W. Martin, H.L Stein discusses his recollections of Kickapoo Chief Captain Hamilton. According to Stein, he first met Captain Hamilton at the general store in Atchison, Kansas in 1867.


History of Kansas and emigrant's guide

History of Kansas and emigrant's guide
Creator: Chapman, J. Butler
Date: 1855
The title page of the printed volume indicated that it contained "a description geographical and topographical--also climate, soil, productions and comparative value with other states and territories, including its political history, officers-candidates-emigrant colonies-election, abolition, squatter and pro-slavery contentions and inquisitions; with the prospects of the territory for freedom or slavery." Mr. Chapman was a resident of the territory and the information in the booklet was compiled by traveling through Kansas Territory in 1854. The description covers most of the territory and includes information about Native American tribes and lands.


Kansas Town and Land Company U. S. land patents

Kansas Town and Land Company U. S. land patents
Creator: United States. General Land Office
Date: 1874-1896
Land patents issued by the United States General Land Office to Albert O. Baldwin, William O. Alphin, Nora B. Asher, Samuel Bayne, James R. Blades, William H. Blood, John W. Brownlee, Robert L. Butts, Martha A. Davidson, Erving M. Davis, Chesley W. Jones, A. B. Montgomery, Seymour S. Rogers, Ada E. Scates, Isaac D. Smith, James Smith, Herbert H. Springer, George H. Storch, John Sheppard, and Alfred O. Yeatman. Also included is a declaration from the federal government, referencing the June 28, 1862 treaty that established the Kickapoo Indian Reservation, which grants O-Ketch-Kum-Me a designated forty acres.


Kee-an-ne-kuk, chief of the Kickapoos

Kee-an-ne-kuk, chief of the Kickapoos
Creator: Catlin, George, 1796-1872
Date: 1913
This is a sketch of Kee-an-ne-kuk (c. 1790-1852) printed in "North American Indians, Being Letters and Notes On Their Manners, Customs, and Conditions, Written During Eight Years' Travel Amongst The Wildest Tribes Of Indians In North America, 1832-1839" by George Catlin. Kee-an-ne-kuk, a member of the Kickapoo tribe, was usually called the Kickapoo Prophet. He was a Kickapoo medicine man and spiritual leader of the Vermilion band of the Kickapoo nation. According to George Catlin, Kee-an-ne-kuk was a "very shrewd and talented man. When he sat for his portrait, he took his attitude as seen in the picture, which was that of prayer."


Kee-an-ne-kuk, the Kickapoo Prophet

Kee-an-ne-kuk, the Kickapoo Prophet
Date: Between 1900 and 1910
This is a pencil sketch drawn by an unknown artist from an original painting of Kee-an-ne-kuk, who was called the Kickapoo Prophet. He was a Kickapoo chief, medicine man and spiritual leader of the Vermilion band of the Kickapoo nation. Kee-an-ne-kuk moved with his tribe to Indian Territory (present-day Kansas) in 1832.


Kennekuk's prayer-stick illustration

Kennekuk's prayer-stick illustration
Creator: Custer, Milo
Date: December 10, 1906
This item, drawn by Milo Custer, depicts the prayer-stick of Kickapoo leader Kennekuk. According to Custer, Kennekuk's stick, which was then owned by John Winsee, was given to Custer during a visit to the Kickapoo Reservation in October 1906. Custer states that the illustration depicts the prayer-stick accurately, and to scale.


Kennekuk, "The Kickapoo Prophet"

Kennekuk, "The Kickapoo Prophet"
Date: between 1819 and 1845
This portrait by an unidentified artist depicts the Kickapoo chief Kennekuk, who moved with his tribe to Indian Territory (present-day Kansas) in 1832. The Kickapoo tribe had originally claimed land in Illinois, but they ceded this land to the United States in 1819. In the next year they moved to lands in Missouri, where they stayed for twelve years. The reverse of the print refers to Kennekuk as the "Kickapoo Prophet."


Kickapoo Corral, Arkansas River, Cowley County, Kansas

Kickapoo Corral, Arkansas River, Cowley County, Kansas
Date: Bulk 1847-1905
This photograph represents the Kickapoo Corral at the Arkansas River in Winfield, Cowley County, Kansas. The photo was taken by H.E. Shilliman (1847-1909) in Winfield, Kansas. In the bottom right corner in pencil the number 102 is written.


Kickapoo Indian Reserve lands

Kickapoo Indian Reserve lands
Creator: Union Pacific Railroad, Central Branch
Date: 1857
This detailed map of the Kickapoo lands in Kansas shows the location of military roads, railroads, settlements, Indian missions, rivers, wooded areas, and cultivated fields. Kickapoo lands straddled Brown, Jackson, and Atchison counties in Northeast Kansas. The map was compiled by Major C.B. Keith for the Central Branch of the Union Pacific Railroad.


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