Kansas MemoryKansas Memory

Kansas Historical SocietyKansas Historical Society

-

Log In

Username:

Password:

After login, go to:

Register
Forgot Username?
Forgot Password?

Browse Users
Contact us

-

Martha Farnsworth

-

Podcast Archive

Governor Mike Hayden Interview
Details
Listen Now
Subscribe - iTunesSubscribe - RSS

More podcasts

-

Popular Item

Winter 1977, Volume 43, Number 4

-

Random Item

Kansas Film Commission site photographs, towns Caldwell - Everest Kansas Film Commission site photographs, towns Caldwell - Everest

-

Site Statistics

Total images: 627,299
Bookbag items: 37,163
Registered users: 11,230

-

About

Kansas Memory has been created by the Kansas State Historical Society to share its historical collections via the Internet. Read more.

-

Syndication

Matching items: 20

Category Filters

Date - 1830s - 1833

Search within these results


       

Search Tips

Start Over | RSS Feed RSS Feed

View: Image Only | Title Only | Detailed
Sort by: TitleSort by Title, Ascending | Date | Creator | Newest

Showing 1 - 20 of 20 (results per page: 10 | 25 | 50)


Colonel A.C. Pepper to Robert Simerwell

Colonel A.C. Pepper to Robert Simerwell
Creator: Pepper, Abel C., 1793-1860
Date: April 11, 1833
In this letter to Robert Simerwell, Indian Agent Colonel A.C. Pepper tells Simerwell that he is preparing to lead a band of Native Indians led by Quea-Quea-Tah, west in the early part of June 1833, and that the Native Indians "express a wish" that Simerwell accompany them on their journey. Pepper also states that Simerwell should talk with the Native Indians in his area to see if they are interested in moving west with the others and, if so, to meet at Logansport, Indiana on June 10, 1833.


Isaac McCoy journal

Isaac McCoy journal
Creator: McCoy, Isaac, 1784-1846
Date: December 7, 1832 - August 25, 1833
Isaac McCoy kept a journal from 1814 to 1841. This is the ninth part of the journal, covering parts of 1832 and 1833. Isaac McCoy was ordained a Baptist minister in 1810 and served as missionary among the Native Americans in present-day Indiana, Michigan, Missouri and Kansas. He was an advocate of Indian removal from the eastern United States, proposing an Indian state in what is now Kansas, Nebraska, and Oklahoma so Native Americans could be free from the "corrupting influences attending association with the frontier people of that early period." Isaac McCoy was a key part in the work of the Board of Foreign Missions in America and the Committee on Indian Affairs on the issues of Native American emigration and the Indian Removal Act.


Isaac McCoy journal

Isaac McCoy journal
Creator: McCoy, Isaac, 1784-1846
Date: October 25, 1833 - February 6, 1834
Isaac McCoy kept a journal from 1814 to 1841. This is the tenth part of the journal, covering parts of 1833 and 1834. Isaac McCoy was ordained a Baptist minister in 1810 and served as missionary among the Native Americans in present-day Indiana, Michigan, Missouri and Kansas. He was an advocate of Indian removal from the eastern United States, proposing an Indian state in what is now Kansas, Nebraska, and Oklahoma so Native Americans could be free from the "corrupting influences attending association with the frontier people of that early period." Isaac McCoy was a key part in the work of the Board of Foreign Missions in America and the Committee on Indian Affairs on the issues of Native American emigration and the Indian Removal Act.


Joseph N. Bourassa to Robert Simerwell

Joseph N. Bourassa to Robert Simerwell
Creator: Bourassa, Joseph Napolean, 1810-1878
Date: March 30, 1833
In this letter to Robert Simerwell, Joseph Napoleon Bourassa, man of French and Potawatomi descent, argues that good men are needed to help Indians because "the nation for which you have labored for many years is destitute of men qualified for business and more especially at the department of Chiefs."


Robert Simerwell to Colonel Abel C. Pepper

Robert Simerwell to Colonel Abel C. Pepper
Creator: Simerwell, Robert, 1786-1868
Date: April 18, 1833
In this letter to Colonel Abel C. Pepper, Robert Simerwell tells Pepper that the leaders of the Potawatomis would like to visit before deciding where to relocate because they have heard that "in a short time they will see the whites soldiers marching through their country westward." While Simerwell states that he has assured the Chiefs that such fears are largely unfounded, he explains to Pepper that many of the Chiefs are still reluctant to leave.


Robert Simerwell to Lewis Cass

Robert Simerwell to Lewis Cass
Creator: Simerwell, Robert, 1786-1868
Date: April 28, 1833
In this letter to Lewis Cass, Secretary of War for the Jackson Administration, Robert Simerwell asks for permission for his family to accompany a group of Potawatomis west of the Mississippi at the "pulicks expense."


Robert Simerwell to Mrs. Simerwell

Robert Simerwell to Mrs. Simerwell
Creator: Simerwell, Robert, 1786-1868
Date: February 25, 1833
In this letter to his wife, Robert Simerwell explains the Baptist Board of Missions decision regarding his efforts to educate Native Indians. Simerwell states that "the Board wish us to live by ourselves and teach a village school and not to board the scholars." In addition, Simerwell states that the Board would permit a "female missionary to accompany us to teach school" as "this is the plan they intend to adopt with all their missionaries."


Robert Simerwell to Reverend S.M. Cane

Robert Simerwell to Reverend S.M. Cane
Creator: Simerwell, Robert, 1786-1868
Date: April 11, 1833
In this letter to Reverend S.M. Cane, Robert Simerwell explains that he has just visited a number of Potawatomis encamped along the Wabash River in perparation for a move west of the Mississippi River as soon as the U.S. Government "will provide means." Simerwell states that the Potawatomis are ready to start their journey, but must depend on the U.S. Government for protection because they are fearful of the possibility of being harmed by "Indians who delight in spilling blood."


Robert Simerwell to Reverend Samuel Bolles

Robert Simerwell to Reverend Samuel Bolles
Creator: Simerwell, Robert, 1786-1868
Date: June 28, 1833
In this letter to Reverend Samuel Bolles, Robert Simerwell reports that he has been waiting several weeks for the party of emigrating Potawatomies to arrive at Logansport, Indiana, where they were slated to gather before heading West. Simerwell states that he has two wagons with him for the journey, and that the Potawatomies have requested that his family be allowed to accompany him at the U.S. Government's expense. However, Simerwell states that he has received no word on the subject, and that he presumes that the U.S. Government is "careless about rendering us any aid."


Robert Simerwell to Reverend Samuel Bolles

Robert Simerwell to Reverend Samuel Bolles
Creator: Simerwell, Robert, 1786-1868
Date: April 11, 1833
In this letter to Reverend Samuel Bolles, Robert Simerwell addresses his activities after returning to Indiana after having spent several months traveling in Pennsylvania and New York. Simerwell tells Bolles that he recently visited a party of 250 Native Indians on the Wabash who were preparing to move west of the Mississippi. Simerwell also mentions that the Native Indians are led by a man named Keo-Kuck, who is ready to led a number of Native Indians west of the Missouri and south of the Kanzas (Kansas) river. Simerwell explains to Bolles that Keo-Kuck "is a powerful man and exercises great influence over other tribes as well as his own."


Robert Simerwell to the Simerwell Family

Robert Simerwell to the Simerwell Family
Creator: Simerwell, Robert, 1786-1868
Date: January 18, 1833
In this letter to his wife and children, Robert Simerwell responds to a letter he recently received from them while he was visiting Philiadelphia. He also addresses events related to the Nullification Crisis that was the focus of the nation. Clear in his opinions on the matter, Simerwell states that public sentiment is largely against South Carolina. In fact, Simerwell states that "it is generally thought that recours must be had to arms and that S.C. will suffer for her independence." However, Simerwell does not think that "much blood will be spilled if a few of the ringleaders?were taken and dealt with for treason."


United States Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, St. Louis, Missouri. Volume 10, Daybook

United States Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, St. Louis, Missouri. Volume 10, Daybook
Creator: United States. Office of Indian Affairs. Central Superintendency
Date: 1832-1835
This volume contains transactions and expenses as recorded by the Superintendent of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, at St. Louis, Missouri. Expenditures included salary pay for interpreters and blacksmiths, as well as purchases of wood, coal, and corn. A searchable, full-text version of this volume is available by clicking "Text Version" below. Partial funding for the digitization of these records was provided by the National Park Service.


United States Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, St. Louis, Missouri. Volume 21, Accounts

United States Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, St. Louis, Missouri. Volume 21, Accounts
Creator: United States. Office of Indian Affairs. Central Superintendency
Date: 1822-1834
This volume contains the expenditure accounts of Indian agents for the upper Missouri River, including Benjamin O'Fallon, George H. Kennerly, and John Dougherty, as recorded by the Superintendent of Indian Affairs, William Clark (of the Lewis and Clark Expedition). Some of the expenditures include interpreter and agent salaries, supplies, and presents, such as beads and tobacco.


United States Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, St. Louis, Missouri. Volume 22, Accounts

United States Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, St. Louis, Missouri. Volume 22, Accounts
Creator: United States. Office of Indian Affairs. Central Superintendency
Date: 1828-1834
This volume contains the accounts of John F.A. Sanford, Indian agent for the upper Missouri River as recorded by the Superintendent of Indian Affairs, William Clark (of the Lewis and Clark Expedition). Some of the expenditures include interpreter and agent salaries, supplies, and presents, such as beads and tobacco.


United States Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, St. Louis, Missouri. Volume 23, Accounts

United States Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, St. Louis, Missouri. Volume 23, Accounts
Creator: United States. Office of Indian Affairs. Central Superintendency
Date: 1822-1834
This volume contains the account expenditures of Indian agent Lawrence Taliaferro from September 30, 1822 - September 30, 1834. It contains quarterly abstracts of disbursements, and reasons for payment, such as salaries for laborers and interpreters, transportation costs, stationary, and medical services, including one entry for milk given to Chippewa Indians in the hospital at Fort Snelling.


United States Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, St. Louis, Missouri. Volume 26, Accounts

United States Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, St. Louis, Missouri. Volume 26, Accounts
Creator: United States. Office of Indian Affairs. Central Superintendency
Date: 1826-1836
This volume contains records of accounts of Indian agents as recorded by the Superintendent of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, at St. Louis, Missouri. These Indian agents included John F. Hamtramck, Lawrence Taliaferro, Pierre Menard, Jonathan L. Bean, John Dougherty, and John F.A. Sanford. Several pages in this volume are empty or missing. This volume also includes expenditures relating to the Treaty of Prairie du Chien of July 15, 1830. Such expenditures include the support of blacksmiths, the purchase of agricultural implements, and the education of Indian children from several tribes.


United States Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, St. Louis, Missouri. Volume 27, Accounts

United States Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, St. Louis, Missouri. Volume 27, Accounts
Creator: United States. Office of Indian Affairs. Central Superintendency
Date: 1831-1834
This volume contains the records of current accounts of Seneca Indian agents, including Henry C. Brish, Augustin Kennerly and Lieutenant J. Van Horne. They participated in the removal of Seneca Indians from Sandusky County, Ohio to St. Louis and further west and similar emigration of Delaware Indians from Muncie, Indiana to the west. The records show cash amounts received for services and expenditures such as the purchase of wagons and horses. Partial funding for the digitization of these records was provided by the National Park Service.


United States Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, St. Louis, Missouri. Volume 32, Claims under 1824 Sac and Fox Treaty

United States Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, St. Louis, Missouri. Volume 32, Claims under 1824 Sac and Fox Treaty
Creator: United States. Office of Indian Affairs. Central Superintendency
Date: 1828-1837
This volume of miscellaneous papers from the United States Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, St. Louis, Missouri, includes a record of documents and correspondence relating to claims of half-breed Indians, under the Sac & Fox treaty of 1824, to a tract of land between the Des Moines River and the Mississippi River. A searchable, full-text version of this volume is available by clicking "Text Version" below. Partial funding for the digitization of these records was provided by the National Park Service.


United States Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, St. Louis, Missouri. Volume 5, Documents on the emigration of Ottawas and Shawnees

United States Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, St. Louis, Missouri. Volume 5, Documents on the emigration of Ottawas and Shawnees
Creator: United States. Office of Indian Affairs. Central Superintendency
Date: 1832-1834
This volume of correspondence and abstracts from the United States Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, St. Louis, Missouri, relates to the provisioning of emigrating Ottawas and Shawnees. Shawnee Indians were removed from the Wapakoneta, Ohio area and forced to move west. Ottawas were also removed from their land in Ohio and many ended up on reservations in Kansas. Included in this volume are muster rolls of emigrating Shawnee and Ottawa Indians listed by names of head of families. A searchable, full-text version of this volume is available by clicking "Text Version" below. Partial funding for the digitization of these records was provided by the National Park Service.


William Walker to G.P. Disosway

William Walker to G.P. Disosway
Creator: Walker, William
Date: January 19, 1933
In this letter to G.P. Disosway, William Walker describes his travels in and around Upper Sandusky, Ohio, which was where many Native Indians from the Wyandotte tribe were living before being sent to live in Kansas.


Showing 1 - 20

Copyright © 2007-2019 - Kansas Historical Society - Contact Us
This website was developed in part with funding provided by the Information Network of Kansas.