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Kansas Memory has been created by the Kansas State Historical Society to share its historical collections via the Internet. Read more.

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Showing 1 - 21 of 21 (results per page: 10 | 25 | 50)


Arapaho Pipe

Arapaho Pipe
Date: Unknown
The records indicate that this pipe was made by someone from the Arapaho tribe on the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming. It was purchased by two different museums, before finally being purchased by the Kansas Historical Society in 1956. The soft, fine-grained material of the stone enabled the carver to shape and smooth the pipe and drill holes for the bowl and stem. It was likely never smoked as no traces of dottle (tobacco residue) remain within the bowl or on the rim.


Beaded and Quill Worked Pipe Bag

Beaded and Quill Worked Pipe Bag
Date: 1880-1900
Though its origins are not know, this beaded pipe bag has a design similar to those favored by the Lakota Sioux. It was donated in 2006 to the Kansas Historical Society. The bag is made of leather with a leather fringe along the bottom. It is decorated with red, blue, yellow, green, white and gold beads, in addition to porcupine quills dyed red, white, purple, turquoise and yellow.


Beaded Bag

Beaded Bag
Date: Unknown
This beaded bag has a red blanket cloth front and a leather back. The front and flap is decorated in a floral design with small yellow, pink, white, blue, green, and gold glass beads. Larger barrel-shaped green glass beads decorate the edge of the flap and, along with brass bells, decorate the leather fringe at the base of the bag.


Beaded Cushion Top

Beaded Cushion Top
Date: Unknown
This beaded top of a cushion was donated to the Kansas Historical Society and may have a Kaw or Kansa association. The beading was done on maroon wool. The edges have scalloped green, clear, and blue beads with a border of blue, red, clear and green beads. The floral pattern on top has purple, blue, green, clear, gold, white and red beads. Kaw Mission was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971.


Beaded Moccasin

Beaded Moccasin
Date: 1875-1925
This single beaded moccasin was donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 2006. The linear motif pattern, similar to a Central Plains style, is sewn with white, green, blue, and red beads. Beads also border the sole and a strip of beading is on the moccasin back, above the heel.


Beaded Moccasins

Beaded Moccasins
Date: Unknown
These moccasins were originally on display at the Highland Museum (later the Iowa and Sac and Fox Historic Site) in Doniphan County. The rounded toe moccasins have fur lined flaps and hard leather soles. Black cotton bands, stuffed with a red, white and blue printed cotton, trims the sides. The uppers and sides are decorated with a linear motif in red, white and blue beads.


Beaded Moccasins

Beaded Moccasins
Date: Unknown
The pair of slip-on beaded moccasins were donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 2003. They are likely either decorated in a Pawnee or Plains style. The leather moccasins were beaded with dark blue, red and green beads in a floral pattern on the uppers and around the sides. Traces of animal hair remain on the soles in addition to some writing in pencil.


Ceramic Pipe

Ceramic Pipe
Date: Unknown
This ceramic pipe was donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1962. The pipe's surface has a brown glaze that has blackened over the years, perhaps due to smoking. There is tobacco residue present in the pipe bowl's interior. When the pipe arrived in the collections of the Kansas Historical Society it either had no or had lost its provenience, its record of ownership. While this is disappointing it does not mean the pipe has lost all of its utility and value. It can still be used for teaching purposes.


Child's Moccasins

Child's Moccasins
Date: Unknown
This pair of moccasins is decorated in a linear pattern with blue, white, green and red beads. The decoration on the one piece uppers vary slightly. The moccasins have leather ties, tassels on the heels, and cuffs finished with a floral calico material. When they arrived in the collections of the Kansas Historical Society they had lost their provenience, their record of ownership. While this is disappointing, it does not mean the moccasins have lost all of their utility and value. They can still be used for teaching purposes as an example of an early ethnographic items in Kansas.


Decorated Pipestone Pipe

Decorated Pipestone Pipe
Date: Unknown
This pipestone pipe was donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1956. The soft, fine-grained material of the pipestone enabled the carver to shape, smooth, and decorate the pipe. The stem end of the pipe has been carved into an octagonal shape and seven of the eight sides are decorated with a floral and crosshatch motif. In Kansas, these pipes generally were carved by American Indians between 1350 to 1850 CE, though they continue to be made today.


German Silver Ornament

German Silver Ornament
Date: 1800-1900
This scalp lock ornament was given to the donor's father by an American Indian chief and, in turn, donated in 1931 to the Kansas Historical Society. German Silver, which was a popular material for trade items in the 19th century, is actually a copper alloy with nickel included. A German silver plate applied to the top of the hair ornament form a circle or flower-like design. Small etched dashes are present in the center of the added plate.


Home Sweet Home Cap

Home Sweet Home Cap
Date: 1904
This black velvet cap was donated in 1980 to the Kansas Historical Society. The interior is cotton lined with the sides stiffened with cardboard. The exterior decorated with "1904" in white beads and "HOME SWEET HOME" in gold beads and embellishments. On top there is a velvet covered button surrounded by beads and tassels with beaded loops. Caps such as these were made and sold by Ioway Indians at the White Cloud Agency.


Kaw Beaded Awl Holder

Kaw Beaded Awl Holder
Date: 1868-1873
This beaded awl holder, with the bone awl still inside, was donated to the Kansas Historical Society. It was given to the donor's mother by a member of the Kaw tribe. Awls were usually made from deer bone and used as a perforating tool in soft material, like hides, and possibly in basket and pottery manufacturing. The awl case is made of buckskin and decorated with white, light blue, pink and dark blue beads in a spiral pattern.


Kaw Beaded Collar

Kaw Beaded Collar
Date: 1868-1873
This beaded collar was beaded on horse hair with leather ends. The blue and white beads form a geometric pattern. The collar was given to the donors mother by a member of the Kaw tribe and later donated to the Kansas Historical Society.


Osage Beaded Moccasins

Osage Beaded Moccasins
Date: Unknown
These beaded moccasins are affiliated with the Osage Tribe. The leather moccasins have beaded tops, sides and soles in white, green, red, blue and metallic colored beads in geometric patterns. The tongues are split into two points that are tipped with metal tinklers and dyed red hair, possibly from a deer. It has been estimated that these moccasins may have been over 100 years old when donated in 1987 to the Kansas Historical Society.


Pipestone Fish

Pipestone Fish
Date: Unknown
Pipestone is a soft, fine grained material that can be carved and shaped. This piece has been carved into a blocky representation of a fish with fine details of the fins, gills, scales, mouth, and eyes with pupils. The fish was donated in the early 1900s and may have been made for the tourist trade.


Potawatomi Bead Work

Potawatomi Bead Work
Date: Unknown
This triangular bead work ornament was donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1960. It was woven on a loom with a variety of colored beads. A yarn loop extends from the top to hang the ornament. Yarn tassels and beads edge the bottom.


Siouan Pipestone Pipe

Siouan Pipestone Pipe
Date: 1880
This pipestone pipe was purchased from the Sioux tribe in 1880 and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1903. The soft, fine-grained material of the pipestone enabled the carver to shape and smooth the pipe. Traces of dottle (tobacco residue) remain within the bowl.


Siouxian Moccasins

Siouxian Moccasins
Date: Unknown
This pair of slip-on beaded and fringed moccasins were donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1902. The leather moccasins have hard soles and were beaded with bands of white, blue and red beads in a geometric pattern on the uppers and around the edges. A leather fringe is attached to the uppers. Also on the uppers is a red dye or stain. The heels have been ripped.


Tobacco Bag

Tobacco Bag
Date: 1875-1925
This beaded and quilled bag was once used to hold tobacco. It was donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 2006. The bag was possibly made of moose hide and shows a Siouxian design popular in the late 19th- to early 20th-centuries. White, green, blue and navy colored beads are used in addition to porcupine quills dyed red, yellow and purple. The bag is edges on three sides with fringe and blue beads.


Zoomorphic Effigy

Zoomorphic Effigy
Date: Unknown
This small effigy was donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1980. Zoomorphic effigies represent animals or birds. This effigy, with its pointed "face," suggests it may have been meant to represent a bird. It is made of igneous rock with incised lines on the body and face. When the effigy arrived in the collections of the Kansas Historical Society it had questionable provenience, its record of ownership. While this is disappointing it does not mean the effigy has lost all of its utility and value as it can still be used for teaching purposes.


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